Home » 2019 » August

Nanocomposite material provides photonic switching

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers develop tough composites of hydrogels and woven fiber fabric (PhysOrg.com) — Integrated photonic devices represent the wave of future technology. These devices will be extremely small, making use of photons on the nanoscale, and (hopefully) be very efficient in terms of power use. The development of integrated photonic devices in tomorrow’s technology is taking place today at Peking University in Beijing, China, where a group of scientists has manufactured and tested a nanocomposite material that could be used in integrated photonic devices.center_img “There are many applications for this work,” Qihuang Gong tells PhysOrg.com. Gong, along with his colleagues Xiaoyong Hu, Ping Jiang, Cheng Xin, Hong Yang, demonstrated a nano-Ag:polymer composite material can be used for photonic switching. Their work appears in Applied Physics Letters: “Nano-Ag:polymeric composite material for ultrafast photonic crystal all-optical switching.”“The nonacomposite material is composed of Ag nanoparticles dispersed in a MEH-PPV matrix,” Gong explains. “MEH-PPV is a nonlinear organic conjugated polymer material.” He points out that the nano-Ag:MEH-PPV composite has a large nonlinear susceptibility and very fast response time under resonant excitation, making it ideal for ultrafast optical switching applications. “Ultrafast response is maintained by use of a fast energy transfer process.” The Chinese group found that it is possible to achieve a nonlinear response time of 35 ps.Join PhysOrg.com on FacebookIn order to experiment with the nanocomposite material, the Peking University group employed a method of femtosecond pump and probe. The Ag nanoparticles, and the MEH-PPV molecules, were resonantly excited by a pump laser. During this process, energy is transferred from the MEH-PPV molecules to the Ag nanoparticles. A delay line was used to change the temporal relations between the pump and probe pulses. “Under the excitation of the pump laser,” Gong explains, “the effective refractive index of the nano-Ag:MEH-PPV composite material changes, which leads to the changes of the photonic band gap and the transmittances of the probe laser.” When this happens, the switching effect is realized.Gong points out that this particular composite material is ideal for all-optical switching at fast speeds. “MEH-PPV possesses high environmental and thermal stability, high optical damage threshold, and good film quality,” he says. Additionally, this material is easy to manufacture, and can be produced using current technology. Gong also notes that this nano-Ag:MEH-PPV composite material has very good waveguide properties. “This approach can be used in practical applications now.”There are limits to this nanocomposite material, Gong concedes. One of the main issues is that, “the organic polymer matrix can be damaged by a strong mechanical force.” This means that the delicate material would need a certain level of careful handling in some cases. Gong also admits that the working wavelength is only about 800 nanometers. More study is needed, Gong says. “Our next steps are to study new approaches to achieving a large nonlinear susceptibility and a femtosecond nonlinear response time simultaneously.”By understanding how these composite materials work, it should be possible to create new materials that can provide a basis for smaller, more efficient devices.More information: Xiaoyong Hu, et. al. “Nano-Ag:polymeric composite material for ultrafast photonic crystal all-optical switching.” Applied Physics Letters (2009). Available online: link.aip.org/link/?APPLAB/94/031103/1 Copyright 2009 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Nanocomposite material provides photonic switching (2009, February 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-02-nanocomposite-material-photonic.htmllast_img read more

Continue reading »

When liquids behave like solids

first_img More information: Juan V. Escobar and Rolando Castillo. “Force of Adhesion Upon Loss of Contact Angle Hysteresis: When a Liquid Behaves Like a Solid.” PRL 111, 226102 (2013). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.226102 (First row) SEM topography images of 1-mm drops of mercury resting on three surfaces of increasing roughness. The third surface is super-mercury-phobic. (Second row) Images of mercury drops during their detachment from these surfaces. While the drops deform considerably on the first two surfaces, on the third surface the drop deforms very little. (Third row) Force data during compression and detachment cycles show a large force hysteresis on the first two surfaces, while the hysteresis is almost absent on the third one. This behavior is similar to that of solids, but very unusual for liquids. Credit: Escobar and Castillo. ©2013 American Physical Society Citation: When liquids behave like solids (2013, December 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-liquids-solids.html Explore further Journal information: Physical Review Letters How slippery are water-repellent surfaces? (w/ Video)center_img But now in a new study, physicists have shown that a droplet of liquid mercury can undergo a reversible compression process like a solid object does, as long as the surface it interacts with is “super-mercury-phobic.” Such a surface is very resistant to mercury, so the mercury droplet does not spread out like a typical liquid droplet does. The physicists, Juan V. Escobar and Rolando Castillo at the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City, have published a paper on how a liquid can behave like a solid in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.”On one hand, we have developed a novel technique with huge potential to study wetting in general and in particular the force of adhesion between a liquid and a solid, and on the other hand we helped bridge two apparently separate areas of physics (surface physics and mechanics),” Escobar told Phys.org. “From a more fundamental point of view, it could be said that our results show how Nature does not care about the specific source of the restoring force in a process of compression: as long as it enters the energy equation in mathematically similar form, the phenomenology will be the same.Normally, the compression of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface is a hysteretic process, meaning that the droplet’s contact angle depends on its compression history. However, previous studies have predicted that the contact angle hysteresis can disappear under certain conditions, essentially making the compression process reversible.Here, the physicists experimentally confirmed this prediction by compressing mercury droplets onto different types of surfaces. On rough surfaces, the droplets still exhibit contact angle hysteresis, but the droplets on the super-mercury-phobic surface do not. The researchers attribute the vanishing contact angle hysteresis to an extremely low surface energy between the droplet and the surface.Along with this finding, the researchers made an unexpected discovery: even though the mercury droplet’s contact angle hysteresis has vanished, it still has a small but measurable adhesion force, which is also independent of its compression history. Taken together, these two observations mean that the mercury droplet behaves like an elastic solid during a repeated compression-decompression process. The researchers explain that this behavior occurs because the dewetting of a liquid can be thought of as the equivalent of the detaching of an elastic solid. These results agree with a theoretical model in which the surface tension of a liquid is the counterpart of the restoring force of an elastic solid. The experiments could have applications for further investigation of a variety of liquid behavior.”Our instrument can be used to study the dynamic wetting of a wide variety of liquids and surfaces,” Escobar said. “In particular, it can be used to study the dynamic formation of the so called ‘pinning points’ that make the contact line stuck (or pin) on the surface (this study is underway). It can also be used to study the phenomenon called non-plastic ageing (this study is also underway). Also, our instrument could be used with polymers as well.” © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —When a rubber ball and a droplet of water are compressed onto a solid surface, they behave very differently. For the ball, the compression process is reversible, so the ball retains its original form when decompressed. In contrast, the compression process for the water droplet is irreversible, and the droplet’s contact angle with the surface irreversibly changes because of the way the droplet interacts with the surface’s chemical or physical inhomogeneities.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Magnetic materials unusual heating effect could fry cancer cells at the perfect

first_img © 2015 Phys.org This graph shows the abrupt change in hysteresis loss near the material’s Curie temperature, which occurs because the material’s magnetism undergoes a phase change from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. At a critical temperature, the material becomes fully paramagnetic and its hysteresis loss abruptly drops to zero, so that the material stays at the critical temperature and physically cannot get any hotter. Credit: Barati, et al. ©2014 AIP Publishing As its temperature approaches its Curie temperature, the material’s magnetism begins to undergo a phase change from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. A paramagnetic material has magnetism that is temporarily induced by an applied magnetic field, but, unlike a ferromagnetic material, it does not retain its magnetism when the field is removed. Journal information: Applied Physics Letters (Phys.org)—When exposed to a varying magnetic field, some conductive materials undergo a temperature increase of about 3-5 K over several minutes. This effect is called induction heating, and it occurs because small electric currents cause heating due to resistance. Now in a new study, scientists have found that, under the same conditions, the temperature of a certain magnetic material increases by more than 20 K in less than a minute—and then abruptly stops and does not increase any further. The large, self-regulated heating power occurs at just the right temperature to potentially enable it to be used as a safe and effective form of hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells. Explore further The phase change from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism in La-Fe-Si-H is somewhat unusual in that the two phases coexist for a few degrees just below 319 K. The most important effect of the phase coexistence in La-Fe-Si-H is that it causes a very large hysteresis loss, which is what leads to the extraordinary heating effect. However, when the temperature reaches 319 K, the material becomes fully paramagnetic. At this point, its large spontaneous magnetism and hysteresis loss abruptly drop to zero, as does the heating effect. The material stays at 319 K and physically cannot get any hotter.As the researchers explain, the phase coexistence is due to La-Fe-Si-H being a “first-order phase transition material.” In contrast, in second-order phase transition materials, the two phases do not coexist, resulting in a much smaller heating power.The large heating power and its abrupt decrease at the Curie point make La-Fe-Si-H a promising candidate for cancer treatment based on hyperthermia. The material’s heating power of 522 W/g demonstrated here is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of second-order phase transition ferromagnetic materials, and possibly the largest of any ferromagnetic material to date with a Curie temperature near human body temperature. It also approaches the recommended value of approximately 1 kW/g for hyperthermia treatment, and does so under nearly biocompatible conditions.The scientists also note that these heat effects have an interesting historical significance. Emil Warburg, a physicist in the late 1800s and early 1900s, is widely credited with discovering the heat dissipation associated with magnetic hysteresis. Although he was not the first to observe the magnetocaloric effect, many articles on the subject have incorrectly credited him with doing so. The new paper bridges these two areas.”In our study, we bring the research fields of magnetocaloric materials and hysteretic dissipation together, utilizing Warburg’s hysteresis in the region of phase coexistence around the Curie temperature of a first order magnetocaloric material,” Sandeman said. This graph shows the very large and self-regulated heating effect of La-Fe-Si-H (near the therapeutic temperature for cancer treatment) compared to another conductive material, magnetite. Credit: Barati, et al. ©2014 AIP Publishing More information: M. R. Barati, et al. “Extraordinary induction heating effect near the first order Curie transition.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4900557 Gadolinium-based material that can be cooled by varying magnetic field Citation: Magnetic material’s unusual heating effect could fry cancer cells at the perfect temperature (2015, February 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-02-magnetic-material-unusual-effect-cancer.html The researchers, led by Professor Kiyonori Suzuki at Monash University, Australia, and Professor Karl G. Sandeman at CUNY-Brooklyn College, US, and Imperial College London, UK, have published their paper on the extraordinary heating effect of the magnetic material in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters. The material, La-Fe-Si-H, is a well-known magnetocaloric material, meaning it heats up when exposed to a magnetic field. La-Fe-Si-H is also ferromagnetic at room temperature, so that its magnetic dipoles align with an applied magnetic field and remain aligned even when the magnetic field is removed. This magnetic retention is an example of hysteresis, an effect in which the present state of a system is influenced by its past states. The scientists explain that the large heating power of La-Fe-Si-H is primarily due to the presence of thermomagnetic hysteresis near its Curie temperature.However, the most significant property of the material is arguably not its large heating power, but its abrupt change in heating power, which is unmatched by any material of its kind. The large heating effect stops just short of the temperatures that could damage healthy cells. As the scientists explain, the abrupt change in heating occurs because of the way that the material’s magnetic behavior changes as its temperature increases. The large hysteresis in La-Fe-Si-H occurs only up to a few degrees below its Curie temperature, which for this material is 319 K (46 °C, 115 °F). This temperature, which is about 21 K above room temperature, lies in the ideal temperature range required for effective yet safe hyperthermia therapy. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Fungus uses zombie female beetles to infect males

first_img Citation: Fungus uses zombie female beetles to infect males (2017, June 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-06-fungus-zombie-female-beetles-infect.html Goldenrod solider beetles are native to North America—they live in meadows and fields and survive by eating flowers. They mate while sitting atop a flower, which is a behavior that may contribute to their demise, the researchers find. The fungus Eryniopsis lampyridarum also lives on the same types of flowers and infects beetles when they visit. Once infected, the beetle’s jaws clamp hard onto the flower, freezing the beetle in place as it dies. Nearly a day later, its wings open as if preparing to take flight. For infected male beetles, the story ends there, but for the females, there is more to come. As they lay there atop the flower, the dead creatures appear to males as ripe for procreation—they fly over and attempt to mate with the zombie female, and in the process become infected with the fungus.Intrigued by the way the fungus has evolved to better spread its spores, the researchers collected beetle specimens and brought them into their lab for study. They report that out of a total of 446 beetles (281 females, 165 males) studied, 90 were infected with the fungus. They also found that it took between 15 to 22 hours for the wings to expand, and that soon thereafter, the fungus also caused the victim’s abdomen to swell. They suggest the fungus causes the response in its dead victims as a means of attracting potential hosts—the outspread wings and oversized abdomen cause the female to look bigger, which is something the males apparently find attractive.The researchers plan to continue their study of the beetles and the fungus, suggesting that it might be interesting to see if they gluing the wings shut impacts on infectivity. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Scientist uses fungus to destroy bark beetles © 2017 Phys.org Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain More information: Donald C. Steinkraus et al. Zombie soldier beetles: Epizootics in the goldenrod soldier beetle,Chauliognathus pensylvanicus(Coleoptera: Cantharidae) caused byEryniopsis lampyridarum(Entomophthoromycotina: Entomophthoraceae), Journal of Invertebrate Pathology (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.jip.2017.05.002 A combined team of researchers from the University of Arkansas and Cornell University has found that a type of fungus kills female goldenrod soldier beetles in a unique way—by causing them to attract males, which assists in spreading spores. In their paper published in the Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, the group describes observations they made of the beetle, experiments they conducted in their lab, and the peculiar way the fungus spread itself to new hosts.last_img read more

Continue reading »

For a better tomorrow

first_imgTo promote and find measures for the same a unique and first ever conference to deal with threats linked to survival of entire humanity is being organised in the Capital.The theme of conference is Balancing Panch-Tatwa Strategically towards Sustainability. Panch Tatwa (five elements) are the basic elements of everything in this universe, including our own body. Based on the same the conference is a fusion of modern science and traditional wisdom to restore balance in Panch-Tatwa. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The consequences of man’s action are evident in terms of various phenomenon including global warming, climate change and environmental degradation in general. Various organisations and people are already doing commendable work towards restoring the delicate balance in nature.The conference aims to unify diverse efforts being put forward by various individuals and organisations towards humanity, sustainability, Panch-Tatwa and traditional wisdom. It’s designed to serve as a common platform for various intellectuals and experts from around the world, to exchange ideas culminating into ‘collective wisdom’ and action plan. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe conference is being organised by non-governmental organisation, Aqua Foundation. The collective wisdom from the conference will be compiled as a book and will be disseminated all around the world.The conference committee is chaired by Prof M S Swaminathan renowned for his leading role in India’s Green Revolution, co-chaired by Dr. R K Pachauri serving as the chairperson of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 2002, which was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007.  The proceedings of this conference and its recommendations will therefore have a far reaching consequence in making it a better world, living in harmony with nature.When: 11-13 DecemberWhere: Indian Habitat Centrelast_img read more

Continue reading »

Mexico mass graves Some bodies found not that of students

first_imgThe governor of the southern Mexico state where 43 college students disappeared after a confrontation with police said that some of the bodies recovered from clandestine graves last weekend did not match the missing young people. The federal attorney general, however, said he felt it was too soon in testing of the remains to come to any conclusions. In indicating that some progress had been made in identifying the dead, Guerrero state governor Angel Aguirre gave no details nor did he say if all of the 28 bodies removed by forensic experts had been identified. The remains were uncovered severely burned, and experts are conducting DNA tests in an effort to identify the dead.  Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenThe governor spoke at a news conference in Iguala, the city where municipal police have been accused of working with a drug gang in the disappearance of the students on 26 Sept. Attorney general Jesus Murillo Karam declined to confirm or dispute the governor’s comments. ‘I do not know on what the governor based that,’’ he said later in the Guerrero state capital, Chilpancingo. He added that experts still ‘have not finished testing.’’ Aguirre also gave no information on what authorities had found in other mass graves that were discovered.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Arsenicaffected villages get access to worlds cheapest potable water in West Bengal

first_imgMadhusudan Kanti (North 24 Parganas): Areas near Indo-Bangladesh border in West Bengal have witnessed a steep decline in arsenic-related diseases over a period of three years after setting up of a cheap and sustainable surface water purification plant. “In course of periodic medical checkup of a group of patients suffering from arsenic-related diseases, it was revealed that this water purification system has become a boon for them (villagers),” sociologist and founder of Sulabh International Bindeshwar Pathak, the brain behind the water project, said. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed Many of the villagers living here were forced to migrate to nearby places before they tried, in vain, every attempt to rid the water of the poison. The cost was too high. They had to pay for every drop of purified water they would fetch from distant towns or cities. Diseases related to the consumption of carcinogenic arsenic contaminated water had even claimed lives in the region. But life started changing three years ago when Sulabh International Social Service Organisation (SISSO), in collaboration with a French company, 1001 Fontaines, installed a Rs 20-lakh pond-based water treatment plant in Madhusudan Kanti Village of North 24 Parganas district, some 100 km from Kolkata. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJP The cost of establishing the plant in Bangaon subdivision, that can produce 8,000 litres of potable water per day at a cost of 10-20 paise a litre, was shared between the French organisation, Sulabh and the villagers. “The villagers and local NGOs maintain this. It is a self-sustainable project with active participation from the villagers and generate employment,” Pathak said. “This is the first time in the world that we have succeeded in producing pure drinking water at a very nominal cost by this new technology and villagers may get direct benefits,” he added. “It is being sold at 50 paise after including other costs like distribution, storing, etc. Even people in neighbouring villages can also safely use this water,” the Sulabh founder further said. Sulabh and the French organisation have also established pilot projects in North 24 Parganas, Murshidabad and Nadia districts of the state, where at many places people are forced to drink arsenic-contaminated water. Pathak believes the entire problem of arsenic-contaminated water could be solved if the West Bengal government took interest and replicated the model. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), arsenic is a natural component of the earth’s crust and is widely distributed throughout the environment — in air, water and land. It is highly toxic in its inorganic form. Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic, mainly by drinking contaminated water, eating food grown or even prepared with this water, can cause skin lesions and cancer. WHO says inorganic arsenic is naturally present at high levels in the groundwater of a number of countries, including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, and the United States.last_img read more

Continue reading »

There is no other feeling like Theatre Adoor Gopalakrishnan

first_imgIn an attempt to honour theatrical excellence specifically famous theatre personage filmmaker Adoor Gopalakrishnan, the Living Legend Series of 18th Bharat Rang Mahotsav hosted an event to felicitate him. The event was held on Tuesday in the national Capital.Born in the era of British India, Adoor Gopalakrishnan is an eminent director and story writer. An award winning artist in the field of film making, Adoor Gopalakrishnan has given the audience amazing artworks like Swayamvaram and Randaanum. He has also been associated to the roots of theatre in the long run. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“The power of stage is so great that nobody can control it when it attracts you. When it attracted me, I realised that theatre is my area and I devoted my life to it. There is no other feeling like theatre and this is its beauty”, commented Adoor Gopalkrishnan on the beginning of his journey.When the audience asked about his genre of films and the idea behind the theme, he said, “The protagonist of my films is a character who has been left behind by passage of time. It revolves around crisis of misfits.” Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAs the impact of natural beauty of Kerala has dominated the space in his films, Gopalakrishnan explained, “I prefer to involve all the five major elements of earth in my films.”Focusing on the trend of today’s cinema, Gopalakrishnan mentioned: “The popular cinema of today is the confined cinema. “It is in limit to what the audience wants to see. Audience do not want to think when they watch a cinema.”Play directors Alok Rajwade, Kailash Panigrahi, Rakesh Bedi and Ronlin Foreman, of plays namely Bin Kamche Sanwad, Ghinua, Mera Wo Matlab Nahi Tha and USA’s presentation Pigeon Show: A Play of Fools interacted with the audience in an open session.Mentioning about his ideology of theatre, eminent actor and director Rakesh Bedi said: “I believe in entertainment. To present your views in front of audience, it has to be in an entertaining form. “You cannot go forward and state the facts or views and hope for a positive response.”last_img read more

Continue reading »

Climate change may affect the finest wines

first_imgClimate change is likely to make the wine producing regions of France and Switzerland too hot for traditionally grown grapes, and vineyards in these regions may then have to switch to hotter climate varieties, change long established methods, move or go out of business, suggests a new NASA study.In much of France and Switzerland, the best years for grapes are traditionally those with abundant spring rains followed by an exceptionally hot summer and late season drought. This drives vines to put forth robust, fast maturing fruit, and brings an early harvest. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In the new study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the scientists analysed 20th and 21st century weather data, pre-modern reconstructions of temperature, precipitation and soil moisture, and vineyard records going back to 1600. They showed that in the relatively cool wine making areas of France and Switzerland, early harvests have always required both above average air temperatures and late season drought. This is because in the past, droughts helped heighten temperature just enough to pass the early harvest threshold.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe researchers said that up to the 1980s, the climate was such that without the extra kick of heat added by droughts, vineyards could not get quite hot enough for an early harvest. That has now changed. The study found that since then, overall warming alone has pushed summer temperatures over the threshold without the aid of drought. On the whole, France warmed about 1.5 degrees celsius during the 20th century, and the upward climb has continued. “Now, it’s become so warm thanks to climate change, grape growers don’t need drought to get these very warm temperatures,” said lead author Benjamin Cook, climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. “After 1980, the drought signal effectively disappears. That means there’s been a fundamental shift in the large-scale climate under which other, local factors operate,” Cook said.“Wine grapes are one of the world’s most valuable horticultural crops and there is increasing evidence that climate change has caused earlier harvest days in this region in recent decades,” Cook pointed out. “Our research suggests that the climate drivers of these early harvests have changed,” Cook noted.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Enjoy festivity with indoor vertical garden

first_imgAs the festive season has begun, people are researching eco-friendly ideas to decorate their house. Having an indoor garden is a unique as well as an environment friendly way to beautify the living space and if you have a space issue then opt for indoor vertical garden. Nowadays, it’s very easy to create your own vertical garden with the presence of new garden concepts like modular planting systems and hanging planters, feel experts. They also shared some useful tips to celebrate the festivals with indoor vertical garden: Also Read – Add new books to your shelf-Frame a vertical garden: It’s a Do It Yourself (DIY) project that can be tried at home without any complication. You need a flat box, a wooden frame, small amount of soil, a metal mesh and a small bud of succulent. Make a photo frame like structure with the flat box and the wooden frame. Add soil into it and cover it with the metal mesh. -The box and the mesh hold the soil in place. Now poke the stems of the succulent bud through the mesh into the soil. Leave the frame lying flat in a cool, bright place till the stems take root. Your beautiful vertical garden is ready. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive-Recycle plastic bottles: It is another DIY project where the used plastic bottles are recycled into pots as creative and fun vertical garden. You need 2-3 plastic bottles, soil, seedlings, string, cardboard and a needle. For the opening, cut a rectangle in the middle of the bottle. -Poke small holes with the help of a needle on the opposite side of the bottle. Line the inner sides of your bottle with cardboard, leaving the holes open. Now add the soil, put the seedlings and water it. Determine the length of the vertical garden and accordingly cut the strings and tie it to the bottle. Hang it at the desired place. -Hanging vertical garden: This vertical suspended garden will give your home a new freshness and decoration which is required around this festive season. To hang the pots, you can choose macrame pendants, this is a trending fashion for suspended gardens and looks very decorative. To alternate this method, you can also go for small wooden shelves where you can place the pots, and holding them with a thick cord of the sailor type will give a beautiful effect in your living space. You can use this method to harvest your own fresh herbs right in your kitchen. -Magnet the plants: This is a very sweet and a simple way to add some bloom to your walls. All you need are some container, preferably of the same shape, paint, washi tape, soil, a small flower plant and a magnet. Take the empty containers and paint them with bright colours and decorate it with washi tapes. Fix 3-4 magnets behind the container with the help of hot glue. You can now easily hang these small pots on any magnetic surface and add a splash of colours to your house. These structures enable space management and also decorate the interiors of houses. You can discover your own unique way to make a vertical garden right inside your house.last_img read more

Continue reading »