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Uncovering history, via shovel

first_imgThe skies above the white tent in Harvard Yard were overcast. The roped-off area near Matthews Hall marked another year in search of history.Staff accompanied students who were joined by Native American community leaders, each bringing a unique perspective to the 10th annual Yard dig. All in attendance were focused on filling in the history of Harvard’s Indian College, established in 1665 with the mission of educating Native American students alongside Puritan students. Having the opportunity to be present at the 2014 Yard dig, I could not help but imagine what life must have been like for a native student in the 1600s.The teaching fellow held up a bag of artifacts unearthed at the 2013 dig, explaining their importance and their collective role in piecing together the story of the Indian College. He passed around a few objects, examples of what could be found in this year’s dig, and explained how each piece was significant.The tiny piece of metal type I held in my hand could be a link between Harvard’s Native American college in 1655 and present-day life in the Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) and the community as a whole. The first Holy Bible translated into the language of the Massachusett Indians was printed here, and this piece of type may have helped produce a piece of history. The pieces of brick being passed around to students and faculty may have been part of the original Native American college, of which key elements were uncovered in the 2009 Yard dig.Matthew DeShaw (left): “To think that I am part of this history is nothing short of remarkable.”Built in 1655, the first brick building in the Yard, the college was erected to educate native youth free of charge. The evolution of Native American education at Harvard is a long one, and not without historical gaps. Much is left to learn about the struggles faced by early native students, as well as the college’s journey from the original charter to its present-day goals of preserving native cultures and embracing their varied histories.To think that I am part of this history is nothing short of remarkable. As I stand in the trench, watching the sifters go through shovels of dirt, I am literally following in the footsteps of all indigenous people at Harvard. When I consider the significance of not only the dig, but of elucidating the actual history of the Indian College, I become aware of how far native education at Harvard has come. It started with the desire to teach students Greek, Hebrew, and religion, but has grown and developed into a program that nurtures each native student’s culture and language, celebrating their history within a larger cultural context. Embracing issues within the native communities and bringing them to the forefront on campus has become HUNAP’s hallmark, changing the face of native education.Observing the dig’s progress led me to a newfound respect for archeologists and historians. Progress is slow and deliberate, every inch of earth charted, excavated, and examined with painstaking precision. It felt extraordinary to be a small part of historical advancement, one that features dirty hands and sore muscles. But what is even more exciting is how Native American history at Harvard College has developed into an example of preserving the past, educating in the present, and preparing for the future.I cannot help but appreciate the struggles and triumphs of generations of indigenous students before me. To appreciate their history is to recognize their contribution in hopes of ultimately making my own. Watching the Yard dig unfold allowed me to witness the front lines of academia. The sifters hummed, kicking out shovel after shovel of excavated material. A crowd assembled around the receptacle containing potential finds. Among the artifacts, I saw a few pieces of coal, aggregates of rock, shards of glass, and an MBTA token. In the age of Charlie cards, even that is an artifact now.Matthew DeShaw ’18 is a member of HUNAP. He will write an occasional column about his student experiences.last_img read more

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Lewis named Harvard Commencement speaker

first_imgBy 1963, Lewis was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the historic March on Washington; he was the event’s youngest keynote speaker and is the only one still living. During Freedom Summer in 1964, he took part in voter registration drives in Mississippi. In March 1965, Lewis and fellow Civil Rights activist Hosea Williams led more than 600 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., where they were caught in a violent maelstrom of tear gas, lunging police dogs, club-wielding onlookers, and punishing fire hoses turned on full blast. Lewis was left with a fractured skull, and the event, broadcast nationwide, hastened the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.In 1977, President Jimmy Carter’s White House called on Lewis to direct ACTION, a federal volunteer agency. In 1981, he entered political life as a member of the Atlanta City Council, and five years later was elected to Congress, representing Atlanta and outlying areas. He is senior chief deputy whip for the Democratic Party in the House, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, a member of its Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support, and ranking member of its Subcommittee on Oversight.A graduate of both Fisk University and the American Baptist Theological Seminary, Lewis holds more than 50 honorary degrees from universities including Columbia, Duke, Howard, and Princeton.Lewis, who as a boy was denied a library card because of his race, is the author of several books. His trilogy “MARCH,” a graphic novel memoir written with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, was a best-seller and won the National Book Award. The “MARCH” trilogy has been adopted into the core curricula of school systems across the country to teach the Civil Rights Movement, and has been selected as a first-year reading text at a variety of colleges and universities.Lewis is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lincoln Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the only John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for Lifetime Achievement ever granted by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. Last year, the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School honored Lewis with the Gleitsman Citizen Activist Award for his 60-year career of advancing human rights.“John Lewis has dedicated his life to making the United States a more just and equitable society,” said Susan Morris Novick ’85, president of the Harvard Alumni Association. “I am sure that his courage, his compassion, and his commitment to service will inspire Harvard alumni and students alike.”As the principal speaker at the Afternoon Program on Commencement Day, Lewis will address the annual meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association, held in Harvard Yard’s Tercentenary Theatre between Widener Library and the Memorial Church.For a full schedule of Commencement Week events, visit the Commencement Office website. Congressman John Lewis, a Civil Rights leader who has represented Georgia’s 5th District for more than 30 years, will be the principal speaker at the Afternoon Program of Harvard’s 367th Commencement on May 24.“For more than 50 years, John Lewis has dedicated himself to the ideals of equality and decency, standing up for what is right, even when it meant putting himself in harm’s way,” Harvard President Drew Faust said. “His public service legacy is unparalleled, and he is an inspiration to me and to countless other people across the United States and around the world.“As president of Harvard, I have been fortunate to welcome Rep. Lewis to campus on several occasions, most memorably in 2012 when he was awarded an honorary degree and in 2016 when he joined me in dedicating a plaque on Wadsworth House in honor of four enslaved persons who lived there in the 1700s. I look forward to hearing his message at Commencement.”Lewis, who was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree from Harvard in 2012, was born to Alabama sharecroppers in 1940 and raised in the Jim Crow South. As a teenager, inspired by the activism of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the radio, he decided to join the Civil Rights Movement. As a student at Fisk University, he organized sit-in demonstrations at segregated lunch counters in Nashville, Tenn. In 1961 he joined the Freedom Riders, protesting segregation by occupying bus seats reserved for whites in the South. The buses were routinely attacked by armed, angry mobs, and that summer Lewis was arrested and beaten — the first of many arrests, beatings, imprisonments, and severe injuries that he sustained during the Civil Rights era. “John Lewis has dedicated his life to making the United States a more just and equitable society. I am sure that his courage, his compassion, and his commitment to service will inspire Harvard alumni and students alike.” — Susan Morris Novick ’85, Harvard Alumni Association presidentlast_img read more

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Virus and Georgia Wheat

first_imgGeorgia wheat farmers figure to get some of the best prices ever for this year’s crop.That makes their losses to a viral disease even harder to take.”We can find barley yellow dwarf virus in just about every wheat field across thestate at some level,” said Randy Hudson, an entomologist with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service. “Fortunately, not all the fields have the same level ofdamage.”Hudson and Dewey Lee, an Extension feed grains agronomist, figure losses will approach$8 million, depending on the weather in the final days before harvest, which starts inlate May.Georgia’s wheat harvest is divided fairly evenly between the part milled for flour andthe grain exported as livestock feed.Farmers’ reduced yields won’t affect the price of your flour or bread because Georgiagrows such a tiny part of the world market. But they’ll take a bite out of an otherwisehealthy boost to the state’s rural economy.Hudson said earliest-planted wheat in east-central Georgia shows the most dramaticsymptoms of the disease. But it’s in other areas, too.”We’veseen losses of more than 50 percent in specific fields in east Georgia,” he said.Other fields may show disease symptoms but not lose much of their wheat.Boyd Padgett, an Extension plant pathologist, said he’s seen the disease in nearlyevery wheat variety grown in Georgia. “Some may be less susceptible, but that’s not immunity,” hesaid.Farmers planted wheat on about 400,000 acres in more than two-thirds of Georgia’s counties this year.Extension economist George Shumaker said low world grain supplies have driven up pricesfor wheat and other small grains.Farmers have seen prices in the $6-per-bushel range for the July 1996 crop. That’s nearly double last year’s$3.50 wheat.This virus relies on aphids to travel from plant to plant and from one field toanother. Partly because they’re so small, aphids are hard to control.Hudson is working with David Buntin, a research entomologist, to control aphids inGeorgia and the Southeast. But barring aphid control, he said, farmers can’t do anything to preventinfection or help infected plants.”A virus causes barley yellow dwarf,” he said. Plant viruses act like mostviruses in humans. You can’t prevent them or cure them.”Farmers need to know this is out there,” Padgett said. “But going outand spraying fungicides for barley yellow dwarf is a waste of time and money.” The disease slows the flow of nutrients from leaves to the forming grain head. As aresult, less grain is harvested. Hudson said the plant makes lower-quality grain, too.Even with the disease problem, this year has been very good for wheat farmers.”The crop condition is good,” Shumaker said. “And farmers who have takenadvantage of the high prices are looking at a very profitable year.”So what can farmers do?Very little besides preparing for next year. “Once they’re aware of theproblem,” Hudson said, “they need to manage their next crop with barley yellowdwarf in mind.”Experts hope ongoing research can provide controls for barley yellow dwarf. Field testsshow that in-furrow insecticide treatments may help control the aphids that carry thevirus.”That could help us,” Hudson said. “But until then, we’ll just grin and bear it. Atleast the wheat Georgia farmers do make is valuable.”last_img read more

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Good Governance: age is a board diversity issue

first_imgThe more ages represented on your board, the more perspectives you can hear at your meeting and more.by: Les Wallace, Ph.D.I serve on two international boards and would be considered a “senior” member of each in both age and experience. I believe my experience is important; I’m not certain the age is. I know I’ve lived long enough to get a whopping lot of experience under my leadership belt. But I also know I’m recruiting and encouraging younger people to step up to governance leadership who, despite fewer years of experience, have loads of competencies and seasoning.While the credit union movement is in active discussion about the need to reach out to young people to become members, the governance discussion in both credit unions and the private sector is about reducing the average age of a board. Suddenly age becomes a diversity issue.Diversity grew up in an era of respecting differences and viewpoints along the dimensions of race, ethnicity and gender. It has since matured more broadly to include sexual orientation, socio-economic status, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, other ideologies and age. While many still see diversity as an equal rights issue, most leadership approaches see it as an intellectual capital issue: The greater the number of perspectives that can be brought to bear on the success of an enterprise, the better.Why should a broad age mix be important for your board? Let’s consider just a few reasons. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Voters send clear message on health care

first_imgThe health-care message was hammered home in Virginia and Maine by huge electoral margins. In exit polls across the Old Dominion, 2 out of 5 voters identified health care as their top concern — more than twice as many as named any other issue.Among those health-care voters, 77 percent favored the Democratic candidate, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, who supports Obamacare and expanding Virginia’s Medicaid program under the law; just 23 percent backed the Republican, Ed Gillespie, who opposes both.In Maine, a referendum to expand Medicaid under Obamacare, which would extend health insurance to some 80,000 low-income adults,won in a landslide, 59 percent to 41 percent.That was a direct rebuke to the Republican governor, Paul LePage, who vetoed Medicaid expansion five times after it was approved, also five times, by the state legislature.The outcome in Maine, which would become the 32nd state to expand Medicaid under Obamacare but the first to do so by referendum, may prompt similar ballot measures in other GOP-dominated holdout states.Nationwide, some 2.5 million uninsured adults who could gain access to Medicaid live in the remaining states that have balked at expansion; about 15 million Americans have signed up for Medicaid under the expansion.It’s not that Americans haven’t heard Republican arguments that expanding health coverage to vulnerable adults will translate into a long-term expense for states – although under Obamacare the federal government will cover at least 90 percent of the cost. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:There’s a long list of issues on which President Donald Trump’s administration, and Republicans generally, are out of step with most Americans, yet on few of them is the chasm so broad or so deep as on health care.On Tuesday, voters made that clear in a pair of purple states, Virginia and Maine, while for the past week Americans across the country have been surging to sign up for health-care coverage under the Affordable Care Act, which the White House and congressional Republicans have tried to repeal and, failing that, sabotage. In fact, voters have taken into account those warnings — as well as the likelihood that expanded Medicaid will create jobs and bolster the finances of some hospitals — and decided they favor expansion anyway.The Trump administration and Capitol Hill Republicans are deaf to the fact that too many Americans lack health insurance.Even after Congress’s attempts to repeal Obamacare; even after the administration slashed outreach and marketing efforts for the open-enrollment period; and even after Trump killed subsidy payments to insurers, threatening higher premiums for some policies, sign-ups through HealthCare.gov had roughly doubled in the enrollment period’s first week, through Nov. 7, compared with the previous year.No matter how often Trump and the GOP call for a federal retreat from ensuring decent health care and insurance, Americans are plainly unconvinced.In fact, there is every indication, including rising approval ratings for Obamacare itself, that the public has rejected the Republican health-care agenda in favor of an active government role.They delivered that message about as clearly as imaginable on Tuesday. Will Republicans in Virginia and around the nation finally pay heed?More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

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Property shares perform poorly in 10-year hangover

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Indonesian banks have sufficient liquidity despite loan restructuring, pandemic: Economists

first_img“We believe that lower loan growth together with various relief measures introduced by the central bank should help to mitigate any potential pressure on funding and liquidity as a result of the coronavirus,” Hannify told The Jakarta Post on Monday. “We expect these ratios to continue to be maintained with a satisfactory buffer throughout 2020.”Read also: State banks say debt relief program could harm bottom lineLoan growth reached 7.95 percent year-on-year (yoy) in the first quarter, higher than the 6.08 percent recorded at the end of last year. However, no new loan demand was recorded in the period as the growth came from the disbursement of existing credit facilities, Financial Services Authority (OJK) chairman Wimboh Santoso said on Monday.The OJK and Bank Indonesia (BI) previously set a loan growth target of around 11 percent this year. The central bank recently slashed its projection to between 6 and 8 percent. The liquidity of Indonesian banks will remain in check despite economic risks brought by the COVID-19 pandemic and loan restructuring program that defers credit repayments, economists have said.Fitch Ratings director for banks Gary Hannify said Indonesia’s 12-largest banks had ample liquidity as reflected in liquidity coverage ratios of about 180 percent at the end of 2019, adding that the industry had above the 100 percent minimum liquidity requirement in recent years.The liquidity coverage ratio is the requirement in which banks must hold an amount of high-quality liquid assets that is enough to fund cash outflows for 30 days. Hannify went on to say that key sources of risk to the banks’ liquidity could stem from a greater-than-expected deterioration in asset quality or a considerable increase in restructuring that defers repayments.“Both would lower incoming cashflow,” he said. “However, loans that need and qualify for restructuring should remain a smaller proportion of the large banks’ loan books and the impact on liquidity should remain manageable for the banks.”The OJK revealed on Monday that 88 banks had provided 3.88 million debtors with credit restructuring worth Rp 336.97 trillion (US$22.57 billion), following the issuance of OJK Regulation No. 11/2020, which instructs financial institutions to provide relief for borrowers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.Nearly 3.5 million applicants are micro, small and medium businesses (MSMEs) as the pandemic forced businesses to close amid large-scale social restrictions to curb the spread of the virus.Read also: Indonesia’s financial system at risk amid pandemic: KSSKMeanwhile, Wimboh said 7.8 million debtors might apply for credit restructuring worth Rp 1.11 quadrillion in 110 banks, adding that the banks had committed to taking part in the program.“We guarantee that the banks’ health would not be shaken because of rising NPL risks,” Wimboh told reporters, referring to non-performing loans or bad debt ratio. “We would help [banks improve their] liquidity together with Bank Indonesia and the Finance Ministry so they do not have liquidity issues.”Under Government Regulation (PP) No. 23/2020 on the national economic recovery program, which took effect on Monday, the government can place funds with certain interest rates at domestic banks, called participant banks, which provide loan restructuring and disburse additional loans to businesses to provide more liquidity to the banks.“The participant banks will later function as supporting banks to provide liquidity for [other] banks, including secondary banks [BPR] that have also provided loan restructuring and disbursed additional loans to businesses,” the PP reads.The liquidity provision will be in the form of a business-to-business scheme.BI has also lowered the reserve requirement ratio for banks that provide loans to export-import businesses, to small and medium businesses and to other prioritized sectors in a bid to provide more liquidity.BI Governor Perry Warjiyo said in April that the policy would boost banks’ liquidity by Rp 117.8 trillion.Read also: Government issues regulation on economic recovery program, focuses on SOEs, MSMEsBanks’ liquidity was deemed adequate after the central bank lowered the reserve requirement ratios, freeing up liquidity for banks to cope with the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, said Bank Central Asia (BCA) chief economist David Sumual.“Risks still loom for the banking industry, including higher NPL level and lower capital flows,” David told the Post.The OJK recorded an increase in NPL ratio to 2.77 percent during the first quarter, still below the 3 percent threshold, versus 2.53 percent recorded in December last year.Contacted separately, Permata Bank economist Josua Pardede said falling consumer demand for credit would cause NPLs to skyrocket and pressure banks’ liquidity.“Reopening the economy would help banks thrive amid the coronavirus outbreak, but it needs thorough preparation to prevent a second wave of the crisis,” Josua said.Topics :last_img read more

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Falkirk retains equity overweight despite commitment to alternatives

first_imgAn investment in social and affordable housing, which forms a standalone asset class outside of its 8% target allocation to alternatives, has also already seen over half of the £30m commitment drawn down by Heathstone Investments.Of that, £15m has been drawn down to invest in short-term debt to support social housing constructions and a further £1.8m to support the building of affordable housing.Falkirk added that its investment would eventually help build 191 social housing units across its catchment area.But according to the fund’s 2014-15 annual report, it said both commitments had been unable to lower its equity holdings below the 60% envisaged in its strategic asset allocation.“In spite of the significant allocation to alternatives, the Fund’s actual equity allocation [of 63%] has continued to exceed its strategic asset allocation due to the very strong performance of global equity markets over the past three years.“The Fund’s strategic allocation to all asset classes is being re-appraised in the ongoing review of investment strategy.” The Falkirk Council Pension Fund has remained overweight to equities despite increasing its exposure to alternatives, including investments in social housing and infrastructure.The £1.8bn (€2.4bn) Scottish local government pension scheme (LGPS), which returned over 13% last financial year, said it had recently completed its first infrastructure investment through a joint mandate with Lothian Pension Fund.It has earmarked a total of £30m for the venture with the fellow local LGPS, of which £2.75m had so far been committed to in a renewable energy fund overseen by Ancala Partners.The allocation has seen Ancala able to acquire Green Highland Renewables, owner of small-scale hydro power projects.last_img read more

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‘Nobody will leave Leicester City – Rodgers

first_imgBrendan Rodgers says no player who he wants to keep will leave Leicester City in the January transfer window. Loading… Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year10 Of The Best Places Around The World To Go Stargazing20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory”Birds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimePlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Non-Obvious Things That Damage Your Phone7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black HolesTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World ‘If I don’t sign anyone I’m so happy to work with the players I have. ‘That’s because I know there’s still a lot of improvement to make and that the right player hasn’t been available to us. ‘So I don’t worry about that because we put our focus into the team and the players that are here.’ Leicester will be without top scorer Jamie Vardy against Wigan on Saturday as the former England striker continues to nurse a calf complaint. Vardy will return to training on Sunday and is expected to be fit for the first leg of the Carabao Cup semi-final against Aston Villa on Wednesday. Rodgers says he will rotate his squad after playing six games in 18 days either side of Christmas. But he insists that Sky Bet Championship strugglers Wigan, fresh from recording a first win in 14 games at Birmingham on Saturday, will not be underestimated. ‘We’ll make some changes, but we’ll pick a team that’s aggressive,’ Rodgers said. ‘For me, there’s no change in terms of mentality. Read Also:Rodgers proud of Leicester show after making nine changes ‘We know we have to attack the game, because they have enough good players to punish us. ‘You’ve seen our players have professionalism and we respect the opposition.’ FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Rodgers is determined to keep intact a squad who have taken Leicester to second place in the Premier League, and who have a real prospect of playing in the Champions League next season. But playmaker James Maddison has been heavily linked with a move to Manchester United, while fellow England international Ben Chilwell is also reportedly attracting interest from rival clubs. ‘Nobody will leave here that we don’t want to go,’ Leicester manager Rodgers said ahead of the FA Cup third-round tie with Wigan. ‘I think we’ve had a couple of enquiries in terms of loans and for some of our younger players. ‘But the players that are always talked about and mentioned, there will be nobody going.’ ‘We know if we’re going to be playing European football next season then we’re going to need the depth, but January is a very difficult month.’ Leicester are in the market to strengthen over the next few weeks, with Rodgers keen to build on an excellent first half of the season. But the Northern Irishman says he is happy to work with the players he has if no new faces are brought in. ‘I think we’ll see if we can improve the squad, and if we don’t then we’ll have to wait until the summer,’ Rodgers said. ‘But as I’ve said before we’re in a really good place and we don’t want to stockpile. ‘They have to be players that are going to improve the squad.last_img read more

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Melissa Ann Mitchell, 53

first_imgMelissa Ann Mitchell, 53, of Cincinnati passed away Wednesday, October 24, 2018 at University of Cincinnati Hospital. She was born in Dillsboro on September 24, 1965 the daughter of Raymond Mitchell and Michael Gutman Stout. Survivors include her three sons; Zach (Jenny) Mitchell of Osgood, Aaron (Mary) Mitchell of Lawrenceburg, and Terry Crist of Lawrenceburg, and 6 grandchildren, significant other Steve Orcutt of Cincinnati, brother; Chris (Connie) Mitchell of Lawrenceburg, two sisters; Kim Roarck and Ronetta Roark both of Versailles. She was preceded in death by her father and mother. Memorial services will be held on Thursday, November 1st, 2018 at 11am at the Hope Baptist Church in Dillsboro with Brother Tom Holt officiating. Visitation will be at 10am until the time of service. Memorials may be given to the donor’s choice in care of the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home.last_img read more

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