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Star South Sevier High Alum Makes All-Nebraska Honorable Mention

first_imgJune 26, 2018 /Sports News – Local Star South Sevier High Alum Makes All-Nebraska Honorable Mention Tags: Kenlee Wanlass/North Platte CC Knights/Omaha World-Herald FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailNORTH PLATTE, Neb.-Per an announcement from the Omaha World-Herald, a former South Sevier High star softball player has made the all-Nebraska two-year college softball team.Kenlee Wanlas, an Elsinore native who starred for the Rams, batted .293 with three doubles for the North Platte C.C. Knights. Additionally, she posted a slugging percentage of .345 and was tied for the team lead with five steals on the season.Wanlass’ magnificence also extended to defense as she broke the all-time program record for fewest errors in a season.Despite being part of a team that went 5-34 on the season, Wanlass was clearly one of the bright spots in 2018 for the Knights. Written by Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Council Honors Linda MacIntyre’s 44 Years of Service to Ocean City

first_imgCity Council paid tribute to retiring City Clerk Linda MacIntyre during an emotional sendoff Monday that included warm words, flowers and a resolution in honor of her 44 years of public service.Ocean City Clerk Linda MacIntyre at her final City Council meeting before retirement.MacIntyre, 63, who was born and raised in Ocean City, said she plans to enjoy her retirement with her husband, Geoff, at their West Station Road home in the Gardens section.Council members and Mayor Jay Gillian praised MacIntyre for her dedication and professionalism during a career that began in 1971, a year after she graduated from Ocean City High School.She was showered with applause and given a standing ovation during what was her last council meeting.“I don’t know how we’re going to replace you,” said Councilman Peter Guinosso, who jokingly suggested that the city should “clone” her.Smiling broadly, MacIntyre thanked everyone for their support over the years and noted that she is leaving with fond memories.“Serving the public is what I wanted to do. I enjoyed every minute of it,” she told Council and her co-workers who were in the audience.The resolution is as follows:WHEREAS, Linda MacIntyre will retire after a career of more than 44 years with the City of Ocean City; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre outlasted nine mayors and nine business administrators since coming to work for the city in 1971 after graduating from Ocean City High School in 1970; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre for 37 years worked hand in hand with commissioners under Ocean City’s old form of government and with mayors and business administrators under the new form before being named City Clerk in 2008; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre for 26 years led Waves of Caring, a nonprofit group collecting and distributing toys to families in need at Christmas, and she is an officer of the Ocean City Ecumenical Council, which gathers food, clothing and money to help those in need; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre was honored among the Women of the Year in 2011 by Zonta International Club of Atlantic City; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre helped set up a temporary location and rebuild the Clerk’s Office after the devastating flood of Superstorm Sandy; andWHEREAS, the City Clerk’s Office under MacIntyre’s leadership has been a model for quality customer service and professional conduct providing a vital link between the public and elected officials; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre will be long remembered for her dedication, professionalism, loyalty, knowledge of local government, good humor and, she will regretfully have to leave behind her cherished pile of Open Public Records Act (OPRA) requests to travel to exotic places; andWHEREAS, MacIntyre will take up residence with two customers who never complain, her cats Zeus and Boots.NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the City Council of Ocean City, NJ, on behalf of all citizens, that Linda MacIntyre is hereby honored and sincerely thanked for her outstanding service to the City of Ocean City, NJ; andBE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Linda and her husband, Geoff, are wished much good health and happiness in the years ahead. Ocean City Clerk Linda MacIntyre at her final City Council meeting before retirement. City Council President Keith Hartzell reads a proclamation honoring retiring City Clerk Linda MacIntyre as council members stand beside her.last_img read more

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News story: Appointments to the School Teachers’ Review Body

first_imgDr Andrew Waller and Ms Harriet Kemp have been appointed to serve as members of the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) for 3 years from 1 September 2018.The STRB provides independent advice to the government on pay and conditions for teachers and school leaders in England and Wales.BiographiesDr Andrew WallerDr Waller has held various HR Director roles at Unilever PLC since 2009, including most recently HR Business Partner to the Chief Information Officer and IT Executive.Dr Waller was also HR Business Partner to the Home Care R&D organisation.Dr Waller has been a school governor for 18 years.Ms Harriet KempMs Kemp is currently an independent consultant, providing advice and support on all aspects of reward and benefits to a number of private sector organisations.Previously, Ms Kemp was the Group Reward Director for Dixon Carphone PLC from 2016 to 2017. Before this Ms Kemp was Director of Group Reward and People Processes at Compass Group PLC from 2011 to 2016.last_img read more

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Beautiful’s Katie Brayben on Emailing Jessie Mueller & Being Surprised by Carole King

first_img View Comments Star Files The West End has a, well, beautiful new star in Katie Brayben, the English actress who won an Olivier Award in April for her performance as Carole King in the London production of Beautiful at the Aldwych Theatre. Having gone to this show directly from appearing as Princess Diana in Mike Bartlett’s Olivier Award-winning (and Broadway-bound) King Charles III, the immediately charming Brayben chatted with Broadway.com about her “whirlwind” year, getting flowers from Jessie Mueller and which legend she might find herself playing on stage next.You’ve had an amazing life of late, landing this sought-after role, meeting Carole King on opening night and winning the Olivier!It’s been such a series of massive events and things that have happened that I almost can’t have a view on it all; it feels so sort of alien for all this to have happened. What’s great now is that we’re running the show eight times a week, which is wonderful. The show feels like it’s really in our hands.What was it like seeing Carole take to the Aldwych stage on opening night?Yes, and I didn’t know she was there! I said very early on that I didn’t want to know when anyone is in, especially Carole, because that would just blow my mind. I thought it would be great if Barry [Mann] and Cynthia [Weil] were there because that wouldn’t be as much stress but with Carole, I couldn’t imagine having to do the show knowing she was in the audience.You had no clue beforehand?My friend Lorna [Want, who plays Cynthia Weil] asked me if I was going to look at Twitter before the show and I said no and she said, “That’s good, don’t do that.” And at the time, I didn’t think anything of it, when in fact Twitter was going off like mad.What did you think when Carole walked onstage?I had the shock of my life! We all know she’s a genius but she’s also an incredible woman.Did she give you any pointers?She did come up with a couple of things and give me some tips but I don’t want to give them away because I use them in the show! [Laughs.] What’s interesting is that there was so much research we were all able to do beforehand just from reading her book and other people’s books, and I found that there was a lot to mine from researching the internet. But it was so great to be able to chat with her about the show. She really loved it, which was wonderful.What was the Olivier ceremony like?Again, a whirlwind. Last year, I was watching it on the telly thinking, “I know that person sitting in the audience,” so to be there the next year having been nominated and then to win was just so far from my compass. And to be in that category with those people being honored in that way was extraordinary.Did you catch the Broadway production before starting work on the show here?In fact, I didn’t. I was doing a show [King Charles III] at the time and it overlapped with our rehearsals so there was no way I could have gone to see it. I did listen to the cast recording while I was doing the auditions but then put it to one side. I thought it was important with a show like this to work from the script on the page and think, “What are we going to do with this? How are we going to own it?” Otherwise, you just end up copying something.Was it tempting to reach out to your Tony-winning predecessor, Jessie Mueller?I had a lovely bunch of flowers from Jessie and we emailed a couple of times. She was very, very sweet. I know that if I had emailed her and said, “I’m having trouble with this,” that she would have emailed me back and given me some great advice. We did have Rebecca [LaChance, Mueller’s former understudy who is now in the UK to do Mack and Mabel] in on Monday of this week and she was so lovely: it really is like a Beautiful family.You have the challenge not just of Jessie’s imprint on the role but of being a Brit playing an American.Well, yes, but you know we’re so influenced by American culture over here and probably vice-versa that I actually don’t think we’re worlds apart. I grew up with the Tapestry album and Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell and I still listen to those artists: they’ve informed the make-up of who I am as a musician as well, because I write my own music.The casting people must have had a jolt when they saw you as Princess Diana in King Charles III: she couldn’t be further removed from Carole King.[Laughs.] Thank heavens they saw me after they’d cast me in Beautiful because I think they were a little confused. But that’s the great thing about what I hope for and I think most actors hope for which is variety in their work. It’s great to be able to say, “I do this but I also do that.”After those two women, who could possibly be next?Hmm, I wonder. [Imitating Margaret Thatcher]: “Well, the pearls are non-negotiable.”You’ve got her down pat, as well!I just love working on voices and physicality. It’s great when you have a real person and can get into the nitty-gritty of who they are. I hope I’ll get to play some other interesting characters from the wonderful world we live in.What about your own career as a singer-songwriter at present?I’d absolutely love to do another album, and at this point I probably haven’t done a live gig in a year or so. But at the moment, everything really is for the show. I’m singing 17 songs a night—twice that on matinee days—so I don’t have the time it takes to sit down and write. My days just now are all about gearing me up for the evening.Maybe at some point you could send some of your original work to Carole?I think I might be a little embarrassed to do that given that she is a genius and I just do my own thing. But you never know, if the opportunity comes up, maybe I will.center_img Jessie Muellerlast_img read more

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DoD Enhancing Emergency Medical Readiness to Address New Global Challenges

first_img A key component included in the updated policies following the Fort Hood recommendations is addressing psychological health needs after mass shootings and other disasters. Disaster Mental Health (DMH) plans will now be developed for each installation and coordinated with other emergency management plans, and the services will establish a Disaster Mental Health Response (DMHR) team at each installation to provide prevention, outreach, screening, psychological first aid, education and referral services, as well as include mental health, spiritual and family support components to individuals, both victims and first responders, or groups who are exposed to an all-hazards incident and may be at risk for anxiety, depression, etc. and may need to be assessed for mental health care needs. The main idea is for each installation to have access to psychological health assets during and after an emergency. “The point … is to foster communication between the (emergency) managers and the mental health contact on their installation in order to coordinate planning for a disaster or emergency,” LCDR Nelson, USPHS policy analyst for FHP&R’s Psychological Health Strategic Operations Directorate (PHSO), said. The Defense Office of Force Health Protection & Readiness (FHP&R) recently helped develop and update two military-wide policies that require Department of Defense (DoD) installations across the globe to adopt enhanced public health emergency management capabilities and civil support measures. The H1N1 flu strain that caused a global pandemic in 2009 led DoD to develop emergency vaccination prioritization and health prevention programs during the crisis to protect personnel and preserve mission readiness, while the August 2010 Fort Hood review sought to broaden DoD’s force health protection approaches to better reflect today’s challenging security environment and included recommendations to build medical provider readiness, mutual aid agreements and mental health care following disasters. The new measures stem largely from experiences gained during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza outbreak, and were reinforced by a DoD review following the tragic mass shooting of U.S. Military personnel at Fort Hood in November 2009. The policies have become ever more prescient given the spate of recent disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, school and movie theater shootings, the Boston Marathon bombings, Oklahoma tornado and emerging global infectious disease like the H7N9 influenza strain in China and a respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) in the Middle East. With the rise of recent natural disasters, global pandemic disease threats and traumatic mass casualty incidents, the U.S. Military Health System is taking several steps to better prepare all its installations worldwide to respond to, assist in and recover from public health emergencies. According to CAPT D. W. Chen, director of FHP&R’s Civil Military Medicine Division, which oversees the public health policy, “Both are key for installations and will guide what base commanders will do before and during a public health emergency. What’s vitally important is getting ready for emerging illnesses like H7N9 and MERS CoV, and having policies in place that help us prepare for that.” They are aimed at better preparing DoD installations to respond to emergencies, protect personnel, save lives and restore operations. DoD installations worldwide are developing implementation plans and multidisciplinary working groups with a base emergency manager and health representatives. center_img The military services are identifying and training individuals to develop and implement PHEM plans on each base, while FHP&R monitors progress and hosts informational meetings. They also teach classes to convey foundational PHEM concepts. By Dialogo July 29, 2013 As a result, FHP&R developed a DoD-wide public health emergency management (PHEM) policy approved in March 2010 and updated in June 2012, and provided input into another for Installation Emergency Management, approved in 2009 and updated in November 2010, for the military services to implement enhanced public health emergency capabilities on installations worldwide. Bases inside and outside the U.S. are affected by the new measures, which additionally require DoD to support and assist U.S. civil authorities in public health emergencies, natural or manmade disasters as directed, and coordinate emergency preparedness training, response and recovery capabilities with state, local and tribal governments, other military departments and host country partners. The resulting inclusion of mental health in the new instructions is aimed at having DoD installations establish enhanced public health teams and plans ahead of time so that any localized emergency response will be well coordinated and augmented appropriately. PHSO director Lt. Col. Theresa Lawson said the subtlety is having mental health service providers in place not only to respond properly during a disaster but also who can follow up sometimes weeks later. For example, first responders may not experience stress symptoms immediately after an incident because they are focused on addressing victims’ acute care needs. last_img read more

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Briefs

first_img June 1, 2006 Regular News Briefs BriefsTHE OCCASION WAS AN AWARDS luncheon in Tallahassee to show appreciation for employees and board members of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. Florida Supreme Court Justice Fred Lewis was among the well-wishers: “I say this from the bottom of my heart and from all the justices at the court: How many ways can we say we love you? Because your function is so vitally important.. . . The discussions at our court are in pure admiration for not only all of you as staff, but those members of the board who volunteer so many hours to come from wherever they may come from in Florida to fulfill the objectives of your work. Believe me, although it may become tedious, as you go through these reports, as you look at these wiggly lines on what all these test results mean, there is a child in Florida that’s impacted by what you do. So it’s not a thankless job at all. We are very thankful for all of you.” The Brandi Cawthon Alvarado Award was presented to Joseph Figo. Merit awards and promotions were presented to Janey Stuart, director of finance and human resources, and Missy Gavagni, deputy executive director. Receiving merit awards were Carlos Green, Annie Speights, Nell McPherson, Cal Walton III, Nikko Evans, Tara Benton, Becca Chambers, Ed Guanche, and Joseph Figo. NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY Law School’s alumni chapter in Palm Beach County honored members of the judiciary and magistrates in Palm Beach County who are NSU graduates at a recent dinner. Included are Fourth District Court of Appeal Judge Melanie May (1981); Magistrate Shelley M. Punancy (1986); Circuit Judge Lucy Brown (1982); Magistrate Diane Kirigin (1984); Circuit Judge Karen Miller (1987); and Magistrate Mary D’Ambrosio (1989). Standing from the left are NSU Law School Dean Joe Harbaugh; Chief Administrative Hearing Officer Howard Milchman (1985); Retired Circuit Judge Howard Berman (1977); Circuit Judge Charles Burton (1984); Circuit Judge Jeff Colbath (1982); County Judge Mark Eissey (1988); Eunice Tall Baros, NSU Alumni Chapter president; and Johanna Rivera, (2000), secretary. Not pictured are Circuit Judge Amy S. Smith (1987); County Judge Jim Martz (1995); and Magistrate Judette Fanelli (1985). For more information about the alumni chapter call (800) 986-6529. THE BANKRUPTCY BAR ASSOCIATION of the Southern District and the 11th Circuit’s Put Something Back program recently presented a pro bono bankruptcy seminar titled, “Bankruptcy: A View from the Bench, Bar & Panel Trustees.” More than 50 attorneys attended this seminar designed to recruit and train pro bono attorneys on the New Bankruptcy Reform Act. Included are Judge A. Jay Cristol, Judge Laurel M. Isicoff, Joel Tabas, Patricia Redmond, Laila Gonzalez, and Michael Frank. Other speakers included: Alan Goldberg, Jim Schwitalla, and Les Osborne. THE PALM BEACH COUNTY BAR, along with the Palm Beach County Chapter of the Association of Legal Administrators, recently collected men’s and ladies’ business suits, shoes, and ties for the benefit of The Lord’s Place and The Public Defender’s Boutique. The fourth annual Law Suit Day Clothing Drive was held in conjunction with the association’s annual Law Week program, which included free legal education programs for adults and school-aged children. The public defender’s office ensures that its clients will have appropriate clothing to wear during their trials. The Lord’s Place is a homeless shelter designed to promote self-sufficiency, self-reliance, and a stable environment for families and individuals. Suzanne Cabrera, executive director of The Lord’s Place; Jennifer Loyless, program coordinator for the public defender’s office; and Kimberly Rommel-Enright, Law Week chair are included. WINNERS OF THE PALM BEACH County Bar Association’s Eighth Annual Professionalism Awards included, from the left, David Ackerman, winner of the individual award; Barry Krischer, accepting the organizational award on behalf of the state attorney’s office, and Judge Ronald Alvarez, recognized with the judicial award. Paul Golis is the chair for the bar’s Professionalism Committee. LASHAWNDA JACKSON, an associate with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell in Orlando, recently received The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division’s Diversity Award, which recognizes Jackson’s efforts and allegiance to creating diversity and for promoting a more diverse workplace. As part of the award, the Young Lawyers Division will make a monetary donation to her charity of choice. Jackson is currently a member of The Florida Bar, the National Bar Association, and the Orange County Bar Association, where she is the co-chair of the Head Start Program Committee and Great Oaks Village Project Committee of the Young Lawyers Section. She is also vice president and chair of the Scholarship Committee for the Paul C. Perkins Bar Association. Included with Jackson is YLD President Jamie Billotte Moses.last_img read more

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How millennials are impacting the housing market

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » In the past ten years, the country has made great strides towards economic recovery, and many millennials who entered the job and housing markets during the downturn have had a chance to pay down their student loan debt and advance in their careers, which means that they finally feel confident about owning a home. In fact, homeownership rates among people in their late 20’s and early 30’s are two to four times higher than any other age group.1As this younger generation has started entering the housing market in force, they’ve done so in true millennial fashion, bringing technology and suburban sensibility with them. In this article, we’ll discuss how this age group is impacting the market.Suburban SensibilityMany millennials who would have otherwise purchased a starter home in the mid-2000’s were deterred by the housing crisis and crippling student loan debt. Now that they can afford it, many first time millennial homeowners are opting to purchase nicer homes in suburban areas.last_img read more

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Owego restaurants aiming to provide a taste of tradition

first_imgThe festival was canceled in April due to coronavirus concerns, but places like The Owego Kitchen and Original’s Bar and Lounge are helping the community get their strawberry fix. Just a few doors down, Original’s is blending up festival favorites: strawberry daiquiris and sangria. “I know it was devastating to a lot of people to not have this gem that we have in our village,” he said. “The event itself just brings families together, it brings communities together, people plan their trips home around the festival.” Manager Bradley Crews said Friday night of the event is generally one of largest nights of the year for Original’s. “Usually we’d be serving that to a community filled with 8,000 to 9,000 people tonight,” he said. “We’ll see who comes in. We hope to see some of our regular smiling faces.” “To be able to offer those strawberry products really makes a difference, people look forward to it,” Lovelass said, “We would still in the spirit of things have those items so we could kind of celebrate it on our own.” Crews’ disappointment also coming from his other role, the president of the Historic Owego Marketplace, the festival’s organizer.center_img Over at the Owego Kitchen, owner Ike Lovelass and his staff have created strawberry and cream croissants, a chilled strawberry soup, and strawberry shortcake. Crews told 12 News this year would’ve been the 40th year of the festival, but he emphasized plans for those celebrations to take place in the summer of 2021. Both Crews and Lovelass were just happy to give their community a taste of tradition. “A little hint of strawberry festival was something we thought was important to do,” Crews said. OWEGO (WBNG) — Restaurants in Owego are putting their berry best forward, as they introduce savory ways for people to enjoy what would have been the annual Owego Strawberry Festival.last_img read more

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Spinach-related E coli cases rise to 187

first_imgSep 29, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The number of people sickened in a nationwide outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections linked to fresh spinach grew to 187 yesterday, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The 187 cases represent an increase of 4 since Sep 26. Ninety-seven people (52%) were hospitalized, and the number of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a serious kidney condition, remained the same at 29 (16%).One death has been blamed on the outbreak so far, an adult in Wisconsin, though health officials in Maryland and Idaho are waiting for lab results in two deaths that may be related to the outbreak.The CDC said the outbreak strain of E coli O157:H7 has now been isolated from nine packages of spinach from patients in seven states. The Los Angeles Times today reported that California health officials have said all were sold as Dole baby spinach and that none were organically grown. Dole baby spinach is one of the many brands packaged by Natural Selections Foods, the largest of five companies involved in recalling products that contain fresh spinach.However, Kevin Reilly, deputy director for prevention service at the California Department of Health Services, told the Times that investigators have not ruled out the possibility that organic spinach is involved in the outbreak.Inspectors employed by two California plants that process spinach for Natural Selections Foods said yesterday that tests for E coli at the plants have been negative, according to the Times report. But Reilly said federal and state investigators have not yet cleared the plants.In other developments, the CDC reported it is helping the Wisconsin Division of Public Health conduct a case-control study of the E coli outbreak. Wisconsin, with 49 cases, has been the hardest-hit state.The CDC said investigators, with the help of a CDC hydrologist, have taken 188 environmental samples so far, including water, products from cultivated fields, and sediment. The investigation is focusing on nine farms in three counties in the greater Salinas Valley growing area: Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Clara.The CDC said spinach grown in these areas is often packaged in other parts of the country and that consumers should not purchase or consume fresh spinach unless they know where it was grown.Though the outbreak appears to be tapering off, the CDC is still advising that people who experience after eating fresh spinach should contact their healthcare provider and ask to be tested for E coli O157:H7.See also:Sep 28 CDC press releasehttp://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2006/september/updates/092806.htmSep 27 CDC updatehttp://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2006/september/response/last_img read more

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Trouble in Paradise

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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