Home » Archive by category "zuwfassa"

Is FTSE 100 stock Sainsbury’s a steal at this price?

first_img I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. The UK’s spending habits have changed dramatically over the last month, or so.  Food has suddenly become the biggest expense for many of us. This should be great news for supermarkets such as FTSE 100 member J Sainsbury (LSE: SBRY), right?But today’s full-year results haven’t gone down particularly well with the market. This isn’t to say trading last year was bad.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Group sales were pretty much flat at just under £32.4bn. The company also highlighted it had outperformed competitors on the grocery front. Underlying pre-tax profit fell 2% to £586m. That was mostly due to a tricky first half hit by increased costs and poor weather.  But let’s not kid ourselves — investment is a forward-looking game. Holders are justifiably more interested in what’s been going on since the coronavirus sent the world into an economic tailspin. On this front, it’s a real mixed bag.Strong demand but…As might be expected, Sainsbury said it had seen strong demand for food as the lockdown came into force and many people began stockpiling. Online retailer Argos — owned by the FTSE 100 constituent — also saw higher sales in early March as people were forced to adapt to working from home. Somewhat predictably, however, the UK’s second-biggest supermarket said demand had normalised over recent weeks. This was partly the result of people adapting to a new normal. It’s also because, as far as Argos is concerned, it couldn’t deliver and install certain items in customer’s homes.In addition to this, the company also saw “materially reduced” sales in product like clothing and fuel. This makes perfect sense given that the only journeys many of us are making are around our homes… in our pyjamas.This trade-off in sales was predictable. As such, it looks like it was the company’s outlook on business that has mostly ruffled investors’ feathers today.…an uncertain outlookLike most businesses, Sainsbury believes it’s “impossible” to know the full financial impact of Covid-19 right now. Nevertheless, outgoing CEO Mike Coupe said the company was working on the presumption that business will remain “disrupted” until mid-September. This is even if lockdowns have been eased by the end of June.Should all this come to pass, Sainsbury estimates underlying pre-tax profit for this year would be “broadly unchanged.” While grocery sales might be good, the cost of protecting its staff and customers, employing thousands of temporary workers to meet demand, and weaker sales elsewhere, will bring things down.Of course, the situation could be worse if the UK lockdown were to be lifted and then reimposed.Better FTSE 100 opportunitiesAs things stand, I just can’t get excited about investing in the company. Even once the coronavirus storm passes, I suspect incoming CEO Simon Roberts faces an uphill task. After all, the prospect of a deep recession will likely have a huge effect on consumer demand, even for ‘essentials’. Combine this with the hyper-competitive nature of its sector, and the fact dividends have been put on hold until later this year, the bull case for Sainsbury begins to look less compelling.So, while a forecast price-to-earnings ratio of 10 may look initially tempting, I think investors should look elsewhere in the FTSE 100 if they really want to see their money grow. A steal, it’s not. Enter Your Email Address Paul Summers | Thursday, 30th April, 2020 | More on: SBRY Is FTSE 100 stock Sainsbury’s a steal at this price? Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Paul Summers Image source: Getty Images. center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Paul Summers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Working-class activists in Ireland defeat Labour-State assault on right to protest

first_imgExcerpted from a report by Ian Ó Dálaigh, general secretary of the organization Éirígí in Ireland, writing in a personal capacity.On Nov. 15, 2014, a spontaneous protest took place in Jobstown, Tallaght, an overwhelmingly working-class area in southwest Dublin. Labour Party leader Joan Burton, who at the time was also tánaiste [26-county deputy prime minister], was delayed in a car for just over two hours by a sit-down protest.The protest was directed against the vicious austerity measures of the Fine Gael/Labour coalition [government]. These measures included cuts to social welfare benefits, disability benefits, and pensions, and attempts to impose a water tax. As both minister of social protection and tánaiste, Burton played a key role in these attacks.Nineteen of the protesters (18 adults and one teenager), including our own Scott Masterson, were arrested and charged with false imprisonment in the wake of this. The teenager has already been convicted.To term a two-hour delay in a car — while surrounded by police — as false imprisonment was absurd, and the charges set a very dangerous precedent. Under this definition, any temporary delay or obstruction at a protest or picket, which for example inconveniences a politician, could be deemed “false imprisonment.” This was about intimidating people and criminalizing protest — and nothing more.During the course of the trial, which commenced on April 24 this year, the state also attempted to further attack the right to free speech and the right to politically organize. Using the spurious cover of “potential jury tampering,” they demanded that the accused should remain silent about the case. The state sought to ban the accused from speaking publicly about the case during the trial and even to impose a ban on solidarity pickets in front of the Criminal Court of Justice.They failed on all counts, just as they eventually failed in their attempts to undermine the right to protest by convicting the Jobstown accused.Scott Masterson’s [attorney], in her closing statement to the jury, suggested that Scott should be thanked by the Irish people for his part in the Jobstown protest. She made the point that the Labour Party are guilty of political treachery, and that people have the right to protest against that treachery — which is exactly what Scott and the other defendants were doing.The trial ran for just over eight weeks, culminating on June 29, when the jury gave a unanimous “not guilty” verdict for the Jobstown 7. The Jobstown Not Guilty campaign is now calling for the immediate dropping of all charges against the other 11 accused, as well as the quashing of the conviction of the 17-year-old in relation to the protest.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Continue reading »

This system is sick

first_imgThe COVID-19 crisis is shedding a glaring light on the contradictions and failures of capitalism. Millions of lives are at risk — and it doesn’t have to be this way. Here in the United States — a country that for more than a century has been in the forefront of the world’s most economically developed nations — the pandemic is killing hundreds of people every day. Nearly a quarter million people in the U.S. have died of the virus since last December — less than a year. That’s nearly a fifth of all the deaths in the world from this disease.Why do we say capitalism is responsible? Just compare the U.S. to the People’s Republic of China — which is NOT capitalist. China has a much bigger population — 1.4 billion people, or four times the U.S. population of 331 million — living on about the same amount of land. And before China’s socialist revolution triumphed in 1949, its development had been held back by imperialist interventions — from Japan, the U.S. and Europe. China was also the first country to be hit by the coronavirus. The first case was reported in Wuhan, back in December 2019. The Chinese government had to quickly mobilize just to find out what was happening with this new disease. Where did it come from? How do you treat it? Should whole neighborhoods be quarantined? If so, how will the people get food and other necessities? All this had to be figured out and acted on quickly.And that’s exactly what happened. Medical teams were rushed to Wuhan. Whole new hospitals were built within days. And sick people were not asked “Do you have health insurance? Who will pay for this?” The disease was quickly contained. As of this Oct. 19, China, with four times the population of the U.S., has had only 4,634 deaths from the virus, compared to — get this — 224,824 deaths in this country, and still rising. (worldometers.info/coronavirus)This boils down to the statistic that a person living in the United States is 200 times more likely to die of the coronavirus than a person in China. What an indictment of this capitalist system! What makes this huge difference?China has a centrally planned, socially owned economy, meaning that in an emergency of this kind, all the resources of society can be focused on dealing with the problem. The health of the people, not the profits of a few, becomes the first priority.If that means commerce in an affected area must be shut down, it happens. If the people need to be quarantined, plans are made to make sure that food and other necessities are safely delivered to them. If they can’t get to their jobs, they won’t get tossed out of their homes or left to starve. All of that was taken care of when the virus first broke out in Wuhan.This is inconceivable in a capitalist country — even one as wealthy as the United States. Right now, millions have been laid off. Small businesses are failing as people hunker down because of the virus. The additional unemployment benefits were terminated in July. The so-called individual “stimulus” payment of $1,200 in April was spent months ago, and neither Trump nor Biden is talking about another one. (It should be noted that more millionaires are actually supporting Biden now than Trump.)This is capitalism. If you’re a worker, you’re on your own. It becomes clearer every day that the accumulation of so many problems, so much suffering, comes from this profit system.It doesn’t have to be this way. Oppression breeds resistance. Resistance brings people together to fight for a common cause. And the struggle must go deeper than just trying to alleviate the symptoms. It must get to the source of the sickness itself: capitalism. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Continue reading »

2016 Oil Price Projections

first_img Global crude oil prices have fallen more than 65% in the last 18 months and are following a long-term falling trend. Rising US crude oil inventories and rising production from OPEC are affecting the crude oil market. Oil prices are trading close to historic lows.Bearish traders could see support at $34 per barrel. Prices tested this mark in December 2015. This was the lowest crude oil price since 2009. Record production from the United States to Russia could drag crude oil prices lower. In contrast, demand from India and lower oil prices could boost consumption and support oil prices. Bullish traders could see resistance at $40 per barrel.Historically, higher production capacities of OPEC member nations have negatively affected crude oil prices. OPEC’s production capacity is expected to increase in 2016 with Iran’s move to scale up production. Meanwhile, Iran forecasts that crude oil could trade between $35 and $50 per barrel in 2016. Crude oil prices might not increase to more than $60 per barrel in the next four years.The mega glut in the oil market, OPEC’s loss of power as a cartel, and slowing demand led to the oil price collapse in 2015, and it could continue in 2016. The last four times crude oil prices had a sharp rebound, it was followed by a recession.The EIA (U.S. Energy Information Administration) estimates that WTI crude oil prices could average $51 per barrel in 2016. Brent crude oil prices could average $56 per barrel in 2016. Danske Bank estimates that crude oil prices could test the $25 per barrel mark before crude oil producers get serious about curbing oil production. Citigroup suggests that Brent and WTI oil prices could average $48 per barrel in 2016.The lower oil prices affect the margins of oil producers like PetroChina (PTR), Occidental Petroleum (OXY), Apache (APA), Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A), Total (TOT), and Petrobras (PBR). They also affect ETFs like the iShares US Oil & Gas Exploration & Production ETF (IEO) and the PowerShares DWA Energy Momentum Portfolio (PXI). SHARE SHARE Home Energy 2016 Oil Price Projections Facebook Twitter Previous article2015 Year in ReviewNext articleWhat Will You Eat in 2016? Gary Truitt 2016 Oil Price Projections Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jan 4, 2016 last_img read more

Continue reading »

The 15 enemies of the Internet and other countries to watch

first_img Help by sharing this information Organisation Reporters Without Borders marks the World Summit on the Information Society by presenting 15 countries that are “enemies of the Internet” and pointing to a dozen others whose attitude to it is worrying. RSF_en The 15 enemies of the Internet(in alphabetical order)- BelarusThe regime uses its monopoly of the communications system to block access to opposition websites when it chooses, especially at election time. President Alexander Lukashenko dislikes criticism, as shown by the harassment in August 2005 of youngsters who were posting satirical cartoons online.- BurmaThis country is among the very worst enemies of Internet freedom and in many ways its policies are worse than China’s. The price of computers and a home Internet connection is prohibitive so Internet cafés are the target of the military regime’s scrutiny. As in neighbouring Vietnam and China, access to opposition sites is systematically blocked, in this case with technology supplied by the US firm Fortinet. Burma’s censorship is special – Web-based e-mail, such as Yahoo! or Hotmail, cannot be used and all Internet café computers record every five minutes the screen being consulted, to spy on what customers are doing. – ChinaChina was one the first repressive countries to grasp the importance of the Internet and of controlling it. It is also one of the few countries that has managed to “sanitise” the Internet by blocking access to all criticism of the regime while at the same time expanding it (China has more than 130 million users). The secret of this success is a clever mix of filter technology, repression and diplomacy. Along with effective spying and censorship technology, the regime is also very good at intimidating users and forcing them to censor their own material. China is the world’s biggest prison for cyber-dissidents, with 62 in prison for what they posted online.- CubaPresident Fidel Castro’s regime has long been good at tapping phones and these days is just as skilled when it comes to the Internet. The Chinese model of expanding the Internet while keeping control of it is too costly, so the regime has simply put the Internet out of reach for virtually the entire population. Being online in Cuba is a rare privilege and requires special permission for the ruling Communist Party. When a user does manage to get connected, often illegally, it is only to a highly-censored version of the Internet.- IranThe information ministry boasts that it currently blocks access to hundreds of thousands of websites, especially those dealing in any way with sex but also those providing any kind of independent news. A score of bloggers were thrown in prison between autumn 2004 and summer 2005. One of them, Mojtaba Saminejad, 23, has been held since February 2005 and was given a two-year sentence in June for supposedly insulting the country’s Supreme Guide, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.- LibyaWith nearly a million people online (about a sixth of the population), Libya could be a model of Internet expansion in the Arab world. But it has no independent media, so the Internet is controlled, with access blocked to dissident exile sites by filters installed by the regime, which is also now targeting cyber-dissidents, with the January 2005 arrest of former bookseller Abdel Razak al-Mansouri, who posted satirical articles on a London-based website. He was sentence in October to 18 months in prison for supposed “illegal possession of a gun.” – NepalKing Gyanendra’s first reflex when he seized power in February 2005 was to cut off Internet access to the outside world. It has since been restored, but the regime continues to control it and most online opposition publications, especially those seen as close to the Maoist rebels, have been blocked inside the country. Bloggers discussing politics or human rights do so under constant pressure from the authorities.- North KoreaThe country is the most closed-off in the world and the government, which has total control of the media, refused until recently to be connected to the Internet. Only a few thousand privileged people have access to it and then only to a heavily-censored version, including about 30 sites praising the regime. Among these is www.uriminzokkiri.com, which has photos and adulation of the “Dear Leader” Kim Jong-il and his late father Kim Il Sung.- Saudi ArabiaThe government agency in charge of “cleaning up” the Web, the Internet Service Unit (ISU), boasts that it currently bars access to nearly 400,000 sites with the aim of protecting citizens from content that is offensive or violates Islamic principles and social standards. The sites blocked deal mainly with sex, politics or religion (except those about Islam that are approved by the regime). This censorship regularly affects blogging, and blogger.com was made inaccessible for several days in October 2005.- SyriaThe accession to power of President Bashar el-Assad in 2000 raised hopes of greater freedom of expression, but these were disappointed. The regime restricts Internet access to a minority of privileged people, filters the Web and very closely monitors online activity. A Kurdish journalism student is in prison for posting photos on a foreign-based site of a demonstration in Damascus. Another Internet user was freed in August 2005 after more than two years in prison for simply passing by e-mail on a foreign-produced newsletter. Both were tortured in prison.- TunisiaPresident Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, whose family has a monopoly on Internet access inside the country, has installed a very effective system of censoring the Internet. All opposition publications are blocked, along with many other news sites. The regime also tries to discourage use of webmail because it is harder to spy on than standard mail programmes that use Outlook. The Reporters Without Borders site cannot be seen inside Tunisia. The government also jails cyber-dissidents and in April 2005, pro-democracy lawyer Mohammed Abbou was given a three-and-a-half-year sentence for criticising the president online. Yet Tunisia seems well thought-of by the international community for its management of the Internet since it has been chosen the International Telecommunication Union to host the second stage of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in November 2005. – TurkmenistanNo independent media exists here under the dictatorship of megalomaniac Stalinist President Neparmurad Nyazov. As in Cuba and North Korea, the regime takes a radical attitude to the Internet and keeps virtually all citizens away from it, with home connections not allowed. There are no Internet cafés and the Web is only accessible through certain companies and international organisations. Even when connected, it is only to a censored version of the Internet.- UzbekistanPresident Islam Karimov proclaimed the “era of the Internet” in his country in May 2001. Online facilities have expanded rapidly but so has censorship of them. The state security service frequently asks ISPs to temporarily block access to opposition sites. Since June 2005, some Internet cafés in the capital have displayed warnings that users will be fined 5,000 soms (4 euros) for looking at pornographic sites and 10,000 (8 euros) for consulting banned political sites. – VietnamThe country closely follows the Chinese method of controlling the Internet, but though more ideologically rigid, the regime does not have the money and technology China has to do this. It has Internet police who filter out “subversive” content and spy on cybercafés. Cyber-dissidents are thrown in prison and three have been in jail for more than three years for daring to speak out online in favour of democracy.Countries to watch(in alphabetical order)- BahrainExcept for pornographic sites, Bahrain does not censor the Internet much. But it has unfortunately begun to regulate it in ways that endanger freedom of expression. The government said in April 2004 that all online publications, including forums and blogs, must be officially registered. Loud protests led to suspension of the measure but it is still on the books. Three editors of a forum were held for nearly two weeks in March 2005 for allowing “defamation” of the king to be posted.- EgyptThe government has taken steps since 2001 to control online material. Though censorship is minor, some criticism of the government is not welcome. The government seems unsure what to do about the explosion of blogs, being more used to pressuring the traditional media. A blogger was arrested for the first time in late October 2005 because of the content of his blog. – European UnionThe EU is responsible for regulating the Internet and rulings often apply to member-states. A European directive on 8 June 2000 about e-commerce proved a threat to freedom of expression, by making ISPs responsible for the content of websites they host and requiring them to block any page they consider illegal when informed of its existence. This creates a private system of justice, where the ISP is called on to decide what is illegal or not. Technicians thus do the job of a judge. The EU is now studying a proposal to oblige ISPs to retain records of customers’ online activity. The proposal could limit Internet users’ right to privacy.- KazakhstanThe media here, including the Internet, are under official pressure and control of online publications has become a key issue because many government scandals have been exposed on websites. President Nursultan Nazarbayev’s regime added new sites to its blacklist in January 2005, including that of a democratic opposition party. In October, an opposition site was forced to give up its national domain name (.kz) after officially-inspired legal action.- MalaysiaGovernment intimidation of online journalists and bloggers has increased in the past three years, notably of Malaysiakini, the country’s only independent online daily whose journalists have been threatened and its premises searched. Summonses and questioning of bloggers has been stepped up recently, leading to self-censorship that harms democracy.- SingaporeThe government does not filter the Internet much but is good at intimidating users and bloggers and website editors have very little room for manoeuvre. A blogger who criticised the country’s university system was forced to shut down his blog in May 2005 after official pressure. – South KoreaThe country is the fourth most-wired country in the world but it excessively filters the Internet, blocking mainly pornographic sites but also publications that supposedly “disturb public order,” including pro-North Korean sites. The government is very sensitive to political opinions expressed online and punishes Internet users they consider go too far. Two users were briefly detained and then fined in 2004 for posting pictures online making fun of opposition figures.- ThailandThe government filters the Internet as part of its fight against pornography and has used it to extend censorship well beyond this. The method employed is also sly, since when a user tries to access a banned site, a message comes back saying “bad gateway,” instead of the usual “access refused” or “site not found.” In June 2005, the websites of two community radio stations very critical of the government were shut down after it pressed their ISP to do so. Reporters Without Borders marks the World Summit on the Information Society by presenting 15 countries that are “enemies of the Internet” and pointing to a dozen others whose attitude to it is worrying.The 15 “enemies” are the countries that crack down hardest on the Internet, censoring independent news sites and opposition publications, monitoring the Web to stifle dissident voices, and harassing, intimidating and sometimes imprisoning Internet users and bloggers who deviate from the regime’s official line. The “countries to watch” do not have much in common with the “enemies of the Internet.” The plight of a Chinese Internet user, who risks prison by mentioning human rights in an online forum, does not compare with the situation of a user in France or the United States. Yet many countries that have so far respected online freedom seem these days to want to control the Internet more. Their often laudable aims include fighting terrorism, paedophilia and Internet-based crime, but the measures sometimes threaten freedom of expression. – United StatesUS policy towards the Internet is important because it is the country where the Internet began. But its laws about interception of online traffic do not provide enough privacy guarantees for users. Leading US Internet firms such as Yahoo!, Cisco Systems and Microsoft are also working with censorship authorities in China, thus throwing doubt on the US commitment to freedom of expression. The United States, home of the First Amendment, the Internet and blogs, should be a model for respecting the rights of Internet users. – ZimbabweThe local media says the government is about to take delivery of Chinese equipment and technology to spy on the Internet. The state telecoms monopoly TelOne asked ISPs in June 2004 to sign contracts allowing it to monitor e-mail traffic and requiring them to take steps to stop illegal material being posted. Since political opposition seems to be regarded as illegal by President Robert Mugabe, this is bad news for the country’s Internet users. November 17, 2005 – Updated on January 25, 2016 The 15 enemies of the Internet and other countries to watch News – The MaldivesThe archipelago is a paradise for tourists but a nightmare for cyber-dissidents. The 25-year regime of President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom cracks down harshly on freedom of expression. Several opposition websites are filtered and one of four people arrested in 2002 is still in prison for helping to produce an e-mailed newsletter. A British company, Cable & Wireless, controls Internet access in the country.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Call for truth about Klebnikov murder after retrial of two Chechens announced

first_img Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Organisation Follow the news on Belarus December 17, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Call for truth about Klebnikov murder after retrial of two Chechens announced Help by sharing this information News June 2, 2021 Find out more to go further “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says News Receive email alertscenter_img May 28, 2021 Find out more RSF_en RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” News News BelarusEurope – Central Asia BelarusEurope – Central Asia Reporters Without Borders fears that the retrial of two Chechens for the July 2004 murder of Paul Klebnikov, editor of the Russian version of the US magazine Forbes, will result at best in a “convenient” verdict for the Moscow authorities. Officials announced on 14 December that the “top secret” trial will start today, and will be held behind closed doors.“There was nothing transparent about the first trial and we appealed at the time for a completely new investigation,” the press freedom organisation said. “But the authorities have stuck to the theory that Klebnikov was killed by Chechens although there is a long list of other potential suspects. More than three years have gone by since his murder and it is high time it was solved.”Moscow city court spokesperson Anna Usachyova announced on 14 December that the retrial would start at 11 a.m. today. She said it had been classified “top secret” and that the press and public would therefore unable to attend. A jury acquitted the two Chechen defendants, Musa Vakhayev and Kazbek Dukuzov, on the grounds of insufficient evidence in May 2006 but the supreme court overturned the verdict in response to an appeal by prosecutor Dmitri Shokhin.The sudden decision to hold the retrial surprised Dukuzov’s court-appointed defence lawyer, Alexander Chernov, who said he was no longer in touch with his client and did not know where he had been since March. Usachyova refused to say if he was still under arrest or if he was now a fugitive from justice. She also said she did not know if the two defendants would attend the trial in person or if there would be a video-link.A Russian-American investigative journalist who had written about alleged links between the Kremlin and Chechen organised crime, Klebnikov was gunned down outside Forbes’ Moscow office on 9 July 2004. He had also claimed that Boris Berezovski, a Russian oligarch now living in exile in London, financed Osama Bin Laden’s activities in Chechnya in order to help Vladimir Putin secure the presidency.The Russian investigators always gave preference to the theory that Klebnikov was killed by Chechens and ignored a US senate resolution of 26 July 2006 urging the Russian authorities to go after those who were behind the murder and to allow the United States and other countries to help with the investigation.A total of 18 journalists have been killed in Russia since Putin became president in March 2000. Russia was ranked 144th out of 169 countries in the latest Reporters Without Borders world press freedom index, issued in October. May 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Continue reading »

Journalist in desert prison could die from untreated asthma attacks

first_img Tunisia : RSF asks Tunisian president’s office to respect journalists July 28, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist in desert prison could die from untreated asthma attacks Organisation Receive email alerts to go further Follow the news on Tunisia Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” News TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa Tunisian journalist Fahem Boukadous has been in extremely poor health since police arrested him on 15 July to begin serving a four-year jail sentence for covering protests in the Gafsa mining region in the spring of 2008 for the international satellite TV station El Hiwar Ettounsi.Boukadous, who suffers from acute asthma attacks and was undergoing medical tests when police arrested him, is being held in a cell in Gafsa prison, in the middle of the desert, where the temperature can rise to 50 C. His days could be numbered if he continues to be denied appropriate medical care.Wife and fellow activist Afef Benaceur saw the deterioration in his health when she visited him in the prison. He was denied prompt medical attention when he had a very acute attack on 23 July. Instead of being given oxygen, as required in such cases, he was left in his cell. Fellow inmates had to beat on their cell doors and shout for help in order to alert the guards to the gravity of the situation.When a doctor from the Gafsa regional hospital finally arrived 40 minutes later, he found Boukadous in an extremely critical condition and notified the prison authorities of his concerns. He was summoned too late and Boukadous could easily have been dead by the time he arrived.Denied due process, Boukadous was sentenced on 13 January by a court in Gafsa to four years in prison on charges of “forming a criminal association liable to attack persons and their property” and “disseminating information liable to disturb public order” under articles 131 and 121 of the criminal code.The Tunisian authorities insist that he is not a journalist although he has worked for El Hiwar Ettounsi since 2006. Reporters Without Borders regards the charges as lacking any basis and calls for his immediate and unconditional release.Reporters Without Borders also condemns the way Boukadous is being denied medical care in violation of international conventions on the rights of detainees. Under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, denial of medical treatment is regarded as violation of the ban on torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. December 26, 2019 Find out morecenter_img November 11, 2020 Find out more RSF_en News Help by sharing this information News TunisiaMiddle East – North Africa News Eleven organizations from civil society create the Forum on Information & Democracy, a structural response to information disorder November 12, 2019 Find out morelast_img read more

Continue reading »

Pasadena Alumnus Inducted Into Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Alumni Hall of Fame

first_imgPeople Pasadena Alumnus Inducted Into Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Alumni Hall of Fame From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 | 3:04 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News Subscribe Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Top of the News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Renowned violinist and Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena alumnus Earl Carlyss was among the inductees into the Boys & Girls Clubs of America National Alumni Hall of Fame at the organization’s annual conference in Chicago this month.A Pasadena Club member in the 1950s, the Chicago-born Carlyss decided to become a professional violinist after winning a local competition at the age of 10. He was further spurred in this pursuit by the Club’s director, Tom Thompson, who encouraged the young Carlyss to apply for the Epstein Fine Arts Fund Grant, which was administered by the Boys Clubs of America as the organization was known at the time.Carlyss won the grant at age 12 and soon after moved to France to study at the Paris Conservatoire in 1955. After two years, he returned to the United States and entered the famed Juilliard School in New York. He made his debut recital in 1962 and became a member of the Juilliard String Quartet in 1966.Carlyss remained a member of the quartet for the next 20 years, performing more than 2,100 concerts and making 100 recordings with his fellow musicians during that time. Along the way, the quartet won three Grammy awards for “Best Chamber Music Recording.” Carlyss has also served as Director of the Aspen Center for Advanced Quartet Studies, one of the nation’s premier chamber music programs, and was the first holder of the Sidney M Friedberg Chair in Chamber Music at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.Today, he teaches violin and chamber music at Juilliard. He is married to pianist Ann Schein.Carlyss joined opera singer Denyce Graves, PGA Golfer Robert Gamez, Philanthropist Monique Mosley, Entertainer Trey Songz, Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter, NFL Hall of Famer Andre Reed, business executive Larry Young, and WWE Chairman & CEO Vince McMahon in receiving this honor, reserved for those alumni who have achieved success in their chosen career fields.About the Boys & Girls Club of PasadenaThe Boys & Girls Club operates two sites in Pasadena—the Slavik Branch at 3230 East Del Mar Blvd. and the Mackenzie-Scott Branch at 2020 North Fair Oaks Ave.—and serves more than 2,500 community youth year-round from Pasadena and the nearby communities of South Pasadena, Alhambra, San Marino, Arcadia, Sierra Madre, La Canada, La Crescenta, Montrose, and Glendale. Since 1937, the mission of the Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena has been to enable all young people, especially those who need it most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring, responsible citizens. The Club promotes the health, education, social, vocational, and character development of boys and girls, ages 6 to 18, and helps improve the lives of these children by helping them build self-assurance and develop leadership skills while reinforcing positive values. Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  HerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBaby Boom: The Stars Are Getting Busy In QuarantineHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeauty 3 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community Newslast_img read more

Continue reading »

Survey Ranks Compliance, Risk Management as Top Lender Concerns

first_img  Print This Post Tagged with: CFPB Compliance Consumer Financial Protection Bureau HMDA Regulation Wolters Kluwer Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Survey Ranks Compliance, Risk Management as Top Lender Concerns About Author: Tory Barringer Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago October 16, 2014 715 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tory Barringer began his journalism career in early 2011, working as a writer for the University of Texas at Arlington’s student newspaper before joining the DS News team in 2012. In addition to contributing to DSNews.com, he is also the online editor for DS News’ sister publication, MReport, which focuses on mortgage banking news. Related Articles Survey Ranks Compliance, Risk Management as Top Lender Concerns The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago CFPB Compliance Consumer Financial Protection Bureau HMDA Regulation Wolters Kluwer 2014-10-16 Tory Barringer Share Save Sign up for DS News Daily Previous: Michigan County Launches Aggressive Foreclosure Campaign Next: DS News Webcast: Friday 10/17/2014 The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Secondary Market Despite regulators’ pledges to work with lenders to help ease their regulatory concerns, a new survey shows worries continue to mount among executives at U.S. banks and credit unions.In a report released Wednesday, Wolters Kluwer Financial Services (WKFS) said its Regulatory & Risk Management Indicator increased again to 128, reflecting a 28 percent rise since its baseline score established in January 2013. The indicator gauges top compliance and risk management concerns at hundreds of lenders nationwide.Looking at compliance challenges, 72 percent of banker respondents listed “maintaining compliance with changing regulations” as one of their top concerns, up from 67 percent at the start of last year, while 69 percent said just keeping track of regulations is a major issue at this point.Meanwhile, 71 percent said they worry about having to demonstrate compliance to regulators.”Clearly, banks and credit unions are feeling increased pressure on their ability to comply with regulatory requirements and appropriately manage risk,” said Tim Burniston, VP and senior director at WKFS’ Risk & Compliance Consulting Practice.On the topic of the Dodd-Frank Act and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the combined Truth in Lending Act (TILA)/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) disclosure rule was the top concern, with 75 percent of respondents ranking it as a worrying issue.Underneath that are the new reporting requirements CFPB demands under the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA). Sixty-three percent of bankers surveyed listed the amendments as a significant challenge compared to just 46 percent in January 2013.The top HMDA challenges cited by respondents were “amount of data to collect” (a response given by 30 percent of lenders), followed by “updating technology systems” (21 percent) and “accuracy of data collected” (19 percent).”The rule changes will double to triple our workload … HMDA already is one of the biggest compliance resource burdens on our bank,” said one respondent.When it comes to concerns about risk management, regulatory risk still ranked highest at 63 percent. Following in a distant second was IT risk at 45 percent—nearly double what it was in 2013.As lenders work to respond to the increased regulatory and risk management challenges, resource management has also become a source of worry. According to WKFS, more than one in three respondents said they have hired additional help or transferred staff from other revenue-generating roles in the past year just to help manage growing risk and compliance requirements. Subscribelast_img read more

Continue reading »

Officials shutter NY club for hosting nearly 400-person party during pandemic

first_imgNYC Sheriff via TwitterBy IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News(NEW YORK) — Officials in New York City said they shut down an illegal club this weekend after it hosted nearly 400 people, a violation of the COVID-19 restrictions on crowd sizes.The New York City Sheriff’s Office tweeted that it found at least 393 people inside a commercial property on West 36th Street in Midtown Manhattan around 2:45 a.m. Saturday.According to New York state’s emergency coronavirus restrictions, all indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to 10 people, and all “bars, restaurants, gyms and fitness centers, as well as any State Liquor Authority-licensed establishment, must close in-person service from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.”The sheriff’s office tweeted that the location had no liquor license and warehoused dozens of bottles of alcohol that were allegedly sold at the party.It also said it issued arrest warrants for four unidentified organizers and charged them for “offenses for penal, health, [and] alcohol beverage control laws.”The party shutdown comes as New York City, which was once the epicenter of the pandemic, is seeing a new wave in cases and hospitalizations, according to health data.The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said between Nov. 1 and Nov. 25, the seven-day average of new daily cases rose from 621 to 1,451, the seven-day average for daily hospitalizations rose from 46 to 106, and the citywide positivity rate increased from 1.88% to 3.49%.Mayor Bill de Blasio has stressed the importance of following the coronavirus guidelines to bring these numbers down.“We’re going to continue to be guided by facts and data as we fight back against #COVID19 and reopen our city,” he tweeted Sunday.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue reading »