Home » Archive by category "ugrtszny"

An examination of the precipitation regime at Thurston Island, Antarctica, from ECMWF re-analysis data

first_imgIn this study numerical weather prediction model data are utilized to examine the precipitation regime at Thurston Island (TI) (∼72°S, 99°W) in West Antarctica. This region was chosen because the precipitation may well reflect the high variability of cyclones in the Amundsen Sea, which in some years appears related to the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. The data used are derived from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA) project, encompassing the 15-year period from 1979 to 1993. A comparison of monthly TI precipitation derived from both ERA and ECMWF operational data for a 101-month overlap period demonstrates that the known ERA problems associated with moisture fluxes over Antarctica are not significant at TI. The annual precipitation cycle at TI (mean of 713 mm water equivalent) is related directly to the frequency of cyclones in the Amundsen Sea, which, in turn, reflects the semi-annual oscillation. The majority of these systems develop in the circumpolar trough although ∼4% undergo cyclogenesis east of New Zealand. No trends in precipitation at TI can be discerned in the model data. Significant precipitation at TI occurs when the longwaves over the Pacific are amplified such that an intense low (blocking high) pressure is located west (east) of the island. Correlations between TI precipitation and mean sea level pressure in these two regions suggest that they are of equal importance in determining the precipitation that falls at TI. There is a small but significant anticorrelation between TI precipitation and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) from 1990 onwards. It is postulated that an increase in cyclone intensity during the El Niño years of the early 1990s is at least partially responsible because cyclone numbers are well correlated to the SOI during this period. No consistent relationship between TI precipitation and SOI is observed prior to 1990 in the ERA data. Copyright © 2000 Royal Meteorological Societylast_img read more

Continue reading »

US Navy Convenes Second Phase of Enlisted Retention Board at NPC

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today US Navy Convenes Second Phase of Enlisted Retention Board at NPC View post tag: Second View post tag: board Authorities The second phase of the Navy’s Enlisted Retention Board convened at Navy Personnel Command (NPC) Sept. 26.ERB Phase II will review the records of 7, 792 Sailors in pay grades E-6 thru E-8 who meet eligibility requirements outlined in NAVADMIN 129/11. The quota and performance based board is charged with identifying the most fully qualified Sailors for retention. Combined, the first and second phase ERB will review approximately 16,000 records for about 13,000 available retention quotas. The primary criterion for retention is sustained superior performance.ERB was announced earlier this year as the Navy faces record-high retention and low attrition among active-duty Sailors. The purpose of the board is to reduce over manning in 31 ratings and to help the Navy meet congressionally mandated end-strength.The ERB was divided into two four-week phases in order to reduce the amount of time selection board members would be required to be away from their commands.The first phase of the ERB convened Aug. 22 to review the records of ERB-eligible Sailors in pay grades E-4 and E-5. That board adjourned Sept. 16 and forwarded its recommendations to NPC.Community managers from the Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) are currently reviewing the Phase I board’s recommendations for conversion opportunities outlined in NAVADMIN 180/11 before forwarding the board’s recommendations to the Chief of Naval Personnel for approval.Phase II results will also be reviewed by BUPERS for conversion opportunities after the board adjourns.Navy expects to release Phase I results in October and Phase II results in November.Sailors not selected for retention on active-duty are encouraged to consider Reserve affiliation and will have access to the Navy’s transition assistance management program and other benefits for members who are involuntary separated.[mappress]Source: navy, September 27, 2011 View post tag: of View post tag: Retention Share this article View post tag: NPC View post tag: At View post tag: Enlisted View post tag: Convenes US Navy Convenes Second Phase of Enlisted Retention Board at NPC View post tag: Navy September 27, 2011 View post tag: phase View post tag: Naval View post tag: US View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

Continue reading »

Six people arrested on drug charges in Peru

first_img Facebook Twitter By Jon Zimney – February 22, 2020 0 459 (Jon Zimney/95.3 MNC) A two week long criminal investigation by the Indiana State Police resulted in the arrests of six Peru residents.Jennifer Brown, 39, Allen O’Malley, 39, Frank Stambaugh, 36, David Jones, 35, Whitney Stambaugh, 33, and Roger Edmondson Jr, 30, were taken to the Miami County Jail to face criminal charges for possession of methamphetamine, possession of a controlled substance, possession of a hypodermic needle, and possession of drug paraphernalia.Whitney Stambaugh faces an additional charge for trafficking methamphetamine.Investogstirs say while she was being booked into the Miami County Jail, methamphetamine was found hidden on her person.Frank Stambugh has an additional charge for possession of methamphetamine, while Jones has an additional count for dealing methamphetamine.State police troopers started an investigation after receiving a citizen’s tip about possible illegal drug activity occurring at a home in the 4600 block of South 50 West in rural Peru.During the course of the investigation, officers developed enough probable cause to be issued a Miami Superior Court II search warrant for the residence.During a search, officer allegedly found approximately 20 grams of methamphetamine, marijuana, prescription medication, syringes, and drug paraphernalia.Officers also served Whitney Stambaugh with two arrest warrants. The warrants were for failure to appear from Wabash and Miami Counties.Brown, O’Malley, Frank Stambuagh, Jones, and Edmondosn Jr were at the residence when the warrant was executed.Anybody with information about illegal drug activity is encouraged to call the Indiana State Police Marijuana Tip Line at 1-888-873-1694. Pinterest Previous articleOlympic wrestler adds to abuse allegations against university doctorNext articleDespite strong start, Buttigieg seeks $13 million for Super Tuesday Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Google+ IndianaNews Twitter Six people arrested on drug charges in Perulast_img read more

Continue reading »

How to avoid catching the common cold

first_img (File Photo/Federated Media) As the cold weather sneaks in do you feel a slight sniffle in your nose or dryness in your throat?Dr. Anthony Zabel with I.U. Health says there is some truth to a cold being connected to a change in the weather because your health is impacted by everything in the environment.“There’s a percentage of the population that actually carries common viruses that cause the common cold in your nose all the time,” he said. “When your physical nose gets cold blood vessels constrict, and your immune system is less able to get into your nose to help to keep those viruses well controlled.”He says you can also catch a cold from being out in the cold air too long, or you may have winter allergies that stem from turning on the furnace for the first time and blowing dust and mold into the air of your house.His advice is to keep your nose covered if you’re prone to catching a cold when you’re out in the cold for too long or reach out to your doctor if you start developing common cold symptoms.“If you’re having regular cold symptoms, maybe a little bit of a scratchy throat and some sniffles, it could be indoor allergies, it could be a different viral infection, or it could be coronavirus,” Dr. Zabel said.He said your doctor may have you take a coronavirus test, but if it comes back negative you’ll at least know if you can return to the workplace and how to manage your symptoms.One way to manage those symptoms is a remedy you’ve been using for years: chicken noodle soup.“Chicken soup actually does make you feel better if you’re sick,” he said. “Whether it’s the warmth of something warm in your throat to soothe a sore throat, or it is a comfort food, which can pick up your spirits overall.”He said other natural remedies you can take is Zinc or vitamin C to help prevent or recover from an infection. Rest, a well-balanced diet, and keeping the stress low can also help fight off a common cold. WhatsApp WhatsApp Facebook How to avoid catching the common cold CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Pinterest By Network Indiana – October 12, 2020 0 210 Pinterest Previous articleOne man jailed, another hurt after OWI-related crash in Elkhart CountyNext articleHometown Heroes 2020 Network Indiana Twitter Google+ Google+ Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Continue reading »

Press release: Government pilot to help parents and carers return to policing

first_imgLast year, police forces across England reported that they had 17% fewer investigators than they needed. But since 2014/15 only 188 full-time earners have rejoined the police in England and Wales after taking time off to act as a caregiver or to start a family. The aim will be to bring back police officers into investigative roles that suit them and enable forces to utilise their wide range of skills and experience.The returners will be equipped with all the necessary skills, training and confidence to return to work in policing. Funded by £110,000 from the GEO, the project will explore the best ways to support returners to the police and will aim to establish an evidence base for police forces across the country to build on in the future.The government has committed £5 million to help people with caring responsibilities back into work. With this funding, GEO have launched programmes in the public sector for social workers, allied health professionals, teachers and prospective civil servants. GEO have also launched a grant fund to set up returners projects in the private sector, with a further £500,000 of funding announced to support marginalised and vulnerable people to return to work.Those who want to take part can register their interest on the College of Policing’s website from today. The pilot programme, run by the College of Policing and funded by the Government Equalities Office (GEO), will start advertising full time investigative roles across nine force areas from April.Minister for Women and Equalities Penny Mordaunt said:“Our police officers keep this country safe and ensure justice is done. It is vital that they, and every woman and man in the UK, have as much freedom, choice and support as they need to return to work when they are ready.“We are investing in this pilot to ensure they have the freedom and support to balance work and caring responsibilities effectively – so they can return to work when they are ready.“In the UK, nine out of 10 potential returners to work are women. By taking action we are supporting our police service while also achieving true gender equality in our workplaces.”Stuart Durrant, former police officer and Return to Investigative Practice project manager for College of Policing, said:“The Return to Investigative Practice project is focused on getting experienced people that have left the policing for care-giving reasons, back into the service.“It is providing us with an excellent opportunity to create an evidence base of what works in attracting and retaining people so their policing skills aren’t lost permanently.“With regulation changes making returning to policing easier, the project will also enable us to understand what support and development these investigators need coming back into forces.”Chief Constable Matt Jukes, national policing lead for investigator resilience, said:“The complex nature of investigations and our work to protect vulnerable people has made the roles of detectives and investigators more challenging than ever.“Despite the progress forces are making, there remains a shortfall in detectives and the need for their skills around complex areas of crime is growing. We rely on our investigators to deliver high quality investigations and justice for victims at a time of changing demand. That is why policing has been developing a number of ways to increase our investigative resilience nationally and locally.“There are former detectives outside the Police who we hope could be part of this. Returner projects like this are important to help bolster and support the outstanding work already being done by existing detectives and investigators up and down the country.”The forces participating in the project are: Hampshire Surrey Sussex Kent Essex Thames Valley City of London Greater Manchester South Waleslast_img read more

Continue reading »

Press release: Readout of PM call with Prime Minister Morrison: 19 May 2019

first_img The Prime Minister spoke to Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison to congratulate him on his election victory. Prime Minister Morrison welcomed the strong bilateral relationship with the UK, and the leaders looked forward to continuing the close cooperation between our countries. They also discussed the opportunities for engagement in the months ahead, including upcoming talks between our Foreign and Defence Ministers. The leaders looked forward to meeting again at the next opportunity. A Downing Street spokesperson said:last_img read more

Continue reading »

Advances in type 2 diabetes drugs

first_imgResearchers from Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Fla., report they have created prototype drugs having powerful anti-diabetic effects, yet apparently free — at least in mice — of dangerous side effects plaguing some current diabetes medications.The researchers say that their “proof-of-principle” findings could lead to safer medications for type 2 diabetes, which affects more than 25 million children and adults in the United States. Their findings are being published Sept. 4 by the journal Nature as an advanced online publication and later in a print edition.One of the drug prototypes proved capable of reducing disease symptoms in diabetes-prone mice without triggering weight gain or fluid retention, potential side effects of current drugs such as rosiglitazone (Avandia) and pioglitazone (Actos) that can have had fatal consequences in some patients.Bruce Spiegelman of Dana-Farber and Patrick Griffin of Scripps led the scientific group that developed a series of related compounds and tested them in overfed and genetically obese mice. While these novel compounds would not be suitable for use in human patients, the scientists say the results showed that they had succeeded in building selective anti-diabetic molecules that minimize the risk of severe side effects.“This insight shows how you can make new compounds that appear to be safer, but you don’t know for sure until a drug is developed that you can give to patients,” says Spiegelman, the Stanley J. Korsmeyer Professor of Cell Biology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School.Avandia and Actos are members of a drug class called thiazolidinediones (TZD) that have proven to be effective, oral diabetes drugs and are well tolerated by most patients. In a minority of patients, however, Avandia and Actos have been linked to cardiac complications, including fatal heart attacks and loss of bone density. The drugs are under close scrutiny by federal regulators, and are prescribed cautiously by physicians.TZD drugs target a metabolic “master regulator” of fat cell development, called PPAR-gamma, which is a transcription factor controlling the behavior of a host of genes and proteins related to diabetes. Spiegelman’s lab discovered the role of PPAR-gamma as a regulator of fat cell development in 1994. The new experimental compounds also target PPAR-gamma, but through a different mechanism discovered this past year.Actos and Avandia are so-called “agonists” of PPAR-gamma. That is, they bind to the molecule, like a key fitting into a lock, and activate it. When activated, PPAR-gamma causes changes in an unknown number of “downstream” genes and proteins. This cascade treats diabetes by improving cells’ response to insulin and helping the body to control blood sugar. However, the researchers believe this series of molecular events initiated by PPAR-gamma agonism also causes the harmful fluid retention, weight gain, and loss of bone density.Until recently, it had been assumed that Avandia and Actos worked exclusively by agonizing PPAR-gamma. But in 2010, Spiegelman and Griffin reported that they had discovered a second, unsuspected effect of the drugs on PPAR-gamma. The TZD drugs, they said, also block a process called phosphorylation, by a molecule known as Cdk5, that modifies PPAR-gamma in a manner that is entirely separate from agonism.  This mechanism, they said, might in fact be more critical to combating diabetes — and, to their surprise, apparently seemed not to cause the worrisome side effects.In the new report, the team describes the development of synthetic small molecules “that bind tightly to PPAR-gamma yet are completely devoid of classical agonism, and effectively inhibit phosphorylation.”These findings suggested that it might be possible to develop new diabetes drugs that work entirely by blocking the phosphorylation of PPAR-gamma, thus separating wanted from unwanted effects.Griffin, who heads Scripps’ Department of Molecular Therapeutics, and his team devised a plan for concocting the prototype drugs. They searched the literature for compounds known to bind with PPAR-gamma, and chose one to serve as a scaffold which they modified in hundreds of ways. The researchers sifted through these modifications until they found several that blocked phosphorylation of PPAR-gamma.The most effective of these candidates, labeled SR1664, was tested in cultured cells and insulin-resistant mice in the Spiegelman laboratory. It was found to have potent anti-diabetic properties but caused no fluid retention or weight gain. When compared with Avandia, SR1664 showed equivalent anti-diabetic effects, confirming the scientists’ hypothesis that diabetes can be treated by drugs that target PPAR-gamma but don’t agonize the molecule.These studies illustrate that the development of entirely new classes of PPAR-gamma-targeted drugs is feasible, concludes Spiegelman, who is the Stanley J. Korsmeyer Professor of Cell Biology and Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues.The co-first authors of the paper are Jang Hyun Choi and Alexander Banks in the Spiegelman lab. Support for the research came from the National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

Continue reading »

The pause that brings peace and productivity

first_imgMany of us feel time-pressured, tethered to our smartphones so we can stay on top of work and home responsibilities. It can be tough to step off the daily merry-go-round, put our phones, laptops, and to-do lists aside, and find decent chunks of quiet time to reflect on our lives.In fact, we may not even be sure how.Yet reflection is important; it gives us a chance to pause and figure out what really matters, especially when struggling with a difficult issue professionally or personally, says Joseph Badaracco, the John Shad Professor of Business Ethics at Harvard Business School, in his new book “Step Back: How to Bring the Art of Reflection into Your Busy Life.”“We often get advice to reflect, and we often give the advice to reflect. But what is reflection?” Badaracco asks. “And how do busy people find time to reflect?”To answer this question, Badaracco studied classic works of reflection, including “Meditations” by Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius, “Spiritual Exercises” by Jesuit order founder Ignatius Loyola, “Essays” by philosopher Michel de Montaigne, as well as many diaries and journals of leaders.“We often get advice to reflect, and we often give the advice to reflect. But what is reflection?”In addition, Badaracco interviewed more than 100 managers, ranging from supervisors to CEOs, from 15 countries to learn how busy men and women today find time for reflection. He found that almost all of them do reflect, but they don’t necessarily rely on long periods of solitude. Instead, they practice the art of reflection “in the cracks and crevices of their everyday lives” to help them make better decisions day by day and problem by problem.Badaracco recommends four design principles for reflection. Like design principles in art and architecture, they don’t explain precisely what to do and when. “That is your call,” he says. What the design principles provide is a template for sound reflection in a hectic world.1: Aim for good enoughFor many of the managers Badaracco interviewed, the biggest obstacle to reflecting was acute time pressure. As one manager said, “I go from commitments at home to commitments at work … I have very little me time.” Others had trouble keeping their thoughts from relentlessly zig-zagging all over the place, or felt restless taking time to sit and think. “I hate feeling idle,” one manager said. “I hate the feeling of not doing anything that I don’t think is productive.”And some resisted reflecting, saying it was easier to focus on the here-and-now, rather than look down the road where they might be forced to grapple with the uncertainty of the future. “It can be a little frightening because, you know, this is the time when I’m supposed to sit down with a pad of paper and really think ahead, and you’d much rather be busy because it’s so easy to focus on the latest emails,” one manager said. “Some of the crazy busyness is self-imposed.”But it doesn’t take ironclad discipline, rigid scheduling, or abandoning the laptop for a full hour to overcome these obstacles. It starts with letting go of the idea that we must reflect in a time-consuming or perfect way; instead, we should “aim for good enough,” Badaracco says. Thoughtful reflection is worth doing, even if we fall short of some ideal—and given the busy pace of our lives, “good enough” reflection is a real accomplishment, he says.How do we aim for good enough? The answer, Badaracco says, is to find an approach that fits comfortably into your life and, even better, involves something you enjoy doing. Some of the managers took advantage of quiet periods when they were doing other things, like exercising, cooking, or commuting to work. “In the car,” one manager said, “I find it really easy to concentrate because there’s nobody talking to me, and you can watch the road, which I think you can do with about half your brain, while the other half is at work.”About a quarter of the managers relied on occasionally writing out their thoughts, in journals and notebooks or even spreadsheets that compared the pros and cons of a problem.And reflection doesn’t have to be a solitary act. Some managers sought out meaningful conversations with trusted others, relying on regular calls to their parents or turning to a colleague who, as one manager said, is “the kind of person you go see when you need to talk something through, so you go to their office and close the door.”2: Downshift occasionallyThe first of the three fundamental approaches to reflection has traditionally been called contemplation, or downshifting from time to time. At work, many people tend to focus on output, and their minds act like race car engines, firing on all cylinders at 200 miles an hour to exert the mental power needed to examine problems, figure out solutions, and get things done.Many of the managers Badaracco interviewed found ways to pause and put their mental machinery into a lower gear, letting their minds unfocus, and resisting the urge to feel continuously productive or decisive. “If something is bothering you about a particular problem, sometimes you have to slow down to recognize it,” Badaracco says.During a work meeting, rather than staying laser-focused on getting through the agenda, take time to look around the room and pay attention: Do coworkers seem interested or bored? Is the conversation heading in the right direction?Badaracco describes a range of approaches interviewees followed and recommends people see what works well for them. One approach suggests mental meandering by letting your thoughts, feelings, and attention wander for a few minutes to see where they go. Look up from your computer screen and take a break from accomplishing task after task.Another suggestion involves simply slowing down physically in order to slow down mentally. One busy executive who managed 1,500 people said when she had meetings away from the office, sometimes she left early to “make my way there slowly” to get a “feel for how things are going.”Other managers turn to nature. One manager, quoting her father, a farmer, said, “The number of people who can walk outside and just look up is so small.” Hitting the beach or a nature trail in the middle of a workday may not be practical, but taking a short walk outside or even looking out the office window or at an indoor plant can help free up the mind.And finally, many interviewees made a conscious effort to take a little time to celebrate progress or successes, rather than staying focused only on their list of to-dos. Some did this by praying and thanking God; others kept a journal of things they are grateful for. Marc Andreesen, the high-profile venture capitalist who helped create the Mosaic Web browser, keeps an “anti-to-do list,” which displays everything he has done during the day to feel a sense of accomplishment, confidence, and motivation to continue.One manager, noting the need to escape what he called the “psychic prison of continuous improvement,” regularly set aside time to celebrate workplace achievements with his staff.“Reflection is often viewed as a gloomy, serious enterprise, where you ask: Where have I failed, and what should I do next?” Badaracco says. “But you ought to look at the full range of things you have already done, including non-work tasks, and pat yourself on the back occasionally.”3: Ponder your hard issuesThe second fundamental approach to reflection is pondering. This means stepping back and consciously looking at a problem from a variety of perspectives.The managers Badaracco interviewed did this in a wide range of ways. Some tried to vividly imagine the everyday consequences of choosing among two different options—such as deciding whether to take a new job or stick with a current one. Some doodled their thoughts, some tried to look at a problem from the perspective of someone they admired or someone who might be badly affected by it, and some tried to see if they had feelings or perspectives on the margins of their minds that they were uncomfortable examining.“Without reflection, we drift.”A few managers even acknowledged that they talked with themselves, sometimes aloud, to see an issue from a wider perspective.“It’s about making a conscious effort to look at things from a variety of viewpoints without trying to crack the case or come up with the answer right away,” Badaracco says.4: Pause and measure upThe third classic approach to reflection involves measuring up. This is particularly relevant when you have to make a decision and act on it. It’s critical to take a few moments to step back and ask yourself which option is best in terms of the standards that others expect you to meet and the standards you have set for yourself, Badaracco says.The managers Badaracco interviewed took different approaches to this way of reflecting. Some imagined what their professional role models would do. Others followed personal principles or mantras that meant a good deal to them, based on earlier experiences in their lives. Some asked themselves what kind of legacy, however modest, they wanted to leave behind before deciding what to do.Reflection promotes growth Reflection, Badaracco says, can enhance your life and your work, if you develop a pattern or mosaic of reflection that meshes with your life and if you occasionally step back further to reflect more deeply.“Without reflection, we drift,” Badaracco says. ”Others shape and direct us. With reflection, we can understand and even bend the trajectories of our lives.”This article originally appeared in Working Knowledge.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Military Forces of Colombia Deal Blow to Residual Organized Armed Group

first_imgBy Myriam Ortega/Diálogo September 22, 2020 In early August, the Colombian Navy and Army dealt a harsh blow to the residual organized armed group (GAO-r, in Spanish) Estructura Sexta, which operates in the Colombian Pacific. In three operations, the Military Forces seized a semisubmersible and 1 ton of marijuana and captured two of the group’s members.Troops from the 24th Marine Riverine Battalion, assigned to the 2nd Marine Brigade, and from the Army’s 2nd Anti-narcotics Battalion found the semisubmersible in the Naya River area. The 30-meter long vessel could carry up to 8 tons of illicit substances, Colombian Marine Corps Colonel José Domingo Cantillo Caro, chief of staff of the 2nd Marine Brigade, told Diálogo. “It’s a naval apparatus built with a particular characteristic, namely that it’s interoceanic; one of these apparatus can easily make it to Mexico, to Central America without a problem, and that’s what stands out,” Col. Cantillo said. “Here in the Pacific, we’ve found improvised shipyards where they build this type of artifact hidden in the mangroves, and little by little they assemble a semisubmersible in about two to three months.”Service members seized more than 680 liters of diesel fuel near the semisubmersible, which suggests that it was ready to be loaded with illicit substances, the Navy said in a statement. The vessel, valued at $1 million, was destroyed in that area, the Navy reported.From January 1 to August 15, 2020, the 2nd Marine Brigade seized four semisubmersibles, 5,900 kilograms of marijuana, and some 8 tons of cocaine hydrochloride, and captured 14 individuals, all from Estructura Sexta, Col. Cantillo said.Authorities dealt another blow to the GAO-r during a raid in Valle del Cauca department, when Army elements captured two members of an Estructura Sexta column. The Army reported that the detainees, alias Negro and alias Mechas, managed the largest drug warehouse in the area.On site, authorities also found a vehicle containing 774 kg of marijuana, the Army said. During another raid against the GAO-r in Cauca department, Army units found 18 packages containing 270 kg of marijuana.last_img read more

Continue reading »

First look at Gold Coast property selling season

first_img79-81 Commodore Drive, Paradise Waters was one of 17 lots to go to auction. Photo: supplied by Diakrit.LUXURY homes and development sites have gone under the hammer in one of the first Gold Coast auction events.A stable of 17 properties were up for auction at the Amir Mian Prestige Property Agents Auction Showcase at the Palazzo Versace. Amir Mian auction showcaseDespite up to 25 registered bidders for the event and a diverse range of property stock, just one property sold under the hammer. Bidding on a suburban Southport residence started at $400,000 before it was called on the market and sold for $610,000. The two-storey residence features a Mediterranean inspired guest house. 33 Palm Ave, Surfers Paradise attracted plenty of Chinese buyer interest.Bidding on a vacant lot at Surfers Paradise inched slowly along, with one bidder offering increments of $1000, before it was ultimately held over at $800,000.“At that site, the bidders are at $800,000 and the sellers are at $950,000 so it’s close,” said Mr Mian, who will now assist negotiations behind closed doors for the 16 remaining properties.“In the next fourteen days we will see where we end up, hopefully there is a medium somewhere.” More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa21 hours agoIt was called on the market at $610,000.“The positive is that 90 per cent of the properties had bidders,” principal Amir Mian said,“Bidders are around five to 10 per cent shy from where the sellers are, so sellers are digging their heels in and so are the buyers.”Mr Mian had said his event would be a “litmus test” of the current Gold Coast property market and how it would move in 2018.“Two things can happen from here next year, either buyers will come up and meet the sellers, or the sellers have to adjust to the market,” he said.“What the sellers need to do now is look at where the market is.” It offers spacious living with river and skyline views.But Mr Mian said the event showed an improvement in bidder activity compared to the last six months.“On the development and land lots, the majority of bidders were Chinese,” he said, “Around 20 per cent of them were from interstate, we had someone from Canberra, we had someone from Melbourne, we had someone from Sydney.”The team is now preparing for another auction showcase in January, planned to coincide with the end of school holidays, interstate market interest and the Chinese New Year. 18 Egerton St, Southport was the sole property to sell under the hammer.last_img read more

Continue reading »