Arson attack by hooded men causes serious damage to independent TV station

first_img News September 29, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Arson attack by hooded men causes serious damage to independent TV station News Help by sharing this information Organisation читать на русском Reporters Without Borders today condemned an attack last night on Pyramid TV, Kyrgyzstan’s oldest independent TV station, in which four hooded men assaulted two technicians who were repairing its main antenna and started a fire that caused about 200,000 dollars in damage.Prime Minister Felix Kulov has told the police to keep a close watch on the station, which is expected to remain off the air for some time while it carries out repairs.“The destruction of the station’s technical equipment points to an escalation in threats against the media and a desire to prevent Pyramid TV from operating,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We urge the Kyrgyz authorities to protect Pyramid TV representatives who have received threats and to do everything necessary to find out who is responsible.”Pyramid TV is often critical of the government and President Kurmanbek Bakiev, and its employees frequently receive threats. Its editor-in-chief, Yelina Chernyavskaya, received a death threat in April. The station has been bought and sold several times, which the staff have condemned. While Aksar Akayev was still president, it was sold to his son-in-law. The station was flooded in December 2005 by individuals who claimed to be its new owners.Pyramid TV’s representatives say they are convinced the attacks have been prompted by its programmes even if they do not know the identity of those responsible. News Receive email alerts RSF calls for the immediate release of Uzbek journalist October 9, 2020 Find out more to go furthercenter_img News August 26, 2020 Find out more RSF_en KyrgyzstanEurope – Central Asia RSF is concerned about the fate of an Uzbek journalist extradited by Kyrgyzstan Follow the news on Kyrgyzstan KyrgyzstanEurope – Central Asia RSF asks authorities, opposition to guarantee reporters’ safety during Kyrgyzstan protests August 14, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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TV host wounded in shooting, motive still unknown

first_img Organisation Follow the news on Dominican Republic Journalists in the city of Santiago de los Caballeros are all worried for their safety today following yesterday’s attack on José Yordi Veras Rodríguez, the producer and presenter of a discussion programme on privately-owned Boreal Televisión-Canal 25, who was shot in the neck and jaw by an unidentified gunman as he arrived at the TV station.The TV show host was rushed to a hospital, where doctors said his injuries were not life-threatening. The motive for the shooting is not yet known.Veras is also a lawyer who sometimes defends sensitive cases, so the motive may have been linked to one of these. The shooting serves as a reminder that, despites its reassuring touristic image, the Dominican Republic continues to be a dangerous country in which journalists who dare to tackle such subjects as drug trafficking or corruption are still exposed to threats, reprisals and physical attacks.Yesterday’s attack took place shortly after 6 a.m., as Veras was about to park his car outside Boreal Televisión-Canal 25. A hooded man appeared and fired through the driver’s side window. Members of the TV station’s staff rushed him to a hospital where he underwent surgery to his injuries and doctors later said he was out of danger.It was in Santiago de los Caballeros that Normando García a cameraman with privately-owned Teleunión, was murdered in August 2008. The authorities should respond to this latest shooting by taking energetic measures to protect journalists and media workers. Until now, their response has not been adequate.Reporters Without Borders hopes that the motive for yesterday’s shooting will be quickly established and that justice will be done.Veras is the son of Ramón Antonio Veras, a prominent human rights lawyer and opponent of Gen. Rafael Leonidas Trujillo, who ruled the Dominican Republic as dictator from 1930 to 1961. News News News Dominican RepublicAmericas Help by sharing this information Dominican RepublicAmericas February 15, 2017 Find out more Hostile climate for Dominican media since start of 2015center_img News RSF_en Receive email alerts to go further Dominican Republic: News presenter and producer gunned down in mid-broadcast June 3, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 TV host wounded in shooting, motive still unknown June 25, 2015 Find out more Journalists wounded while covering street clashes in Santo Domingo September 22, 2014 Find out morelast_img read more

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How women have to fight to be journalists in India

first_img After two events in the past month that shed light on the scale of sexist and misogynistic behaviour towards women journalists in India, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has taken a closer look at the many kinds of prejudice and hostility to which they are constantly exposed. News RSF_en India’s women journalists must combat hate speech and intimidation attempts (photo: Sajjad Hussain / AFP). Organisation News One of the past month’s events was a terrifying online harassment campaign targeting the investigative journalist Rana Ayyub, which included calls for her to be gang-raped and the posting of porn videos with her head digitally superimposed over the heads of the actresses.The other was a less scary but still revealing incident during a press conference by the governor of the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu. When a woman reporter, Lakshmi Subramanian, asked him a question about the Tamil Nadu’s university, his sole response was to pat her cheek.The way the governor did this was so condescending that it sparked a major row on social networks and elicited this extraordinary comment from S.V. Shekher, the ruling Hindu nationalist BJP’s leader in Tamil Nadu: “Illiterate scoundrels are now in media, she [Subramanian] is not an exception to that. No one can become a reporter or news anchor without sleeping with some big shots.”“Such an absolutely intolerable comment is typical of the battle that women journalists must constantly wage in India in order to practice their profession,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk.“They have fought with determination for decades to be accepted in newsrooms and then as reporters in the field, where they still often encounter behaviour that can at best be described as condescending paternalism and sometimes constitutes the most appalling misogynistic violence. All sectors of Indian society – including the public sector, employers and digital platforms – must take concrete measures to change this state of affairs and to allow women journalist to work with complete dignity.”PrejudiceThe prejudice to which women journalists are exposed begins before they even set foot in a newsroom.“Journalism as a career choice is often seen as a risky venture,” said Rituparna Chatterjee, who helped found HuffPost India and now focuses on women’s rights and gender issues. “Parents fear that women who take up journalism will not be attractive in the ‘marriage market’ since typically such women are seen as ‘bold’ and opinionated. Women often leave the field after marriage, facing pressure from in-laws and husbands.”Indian society’s opinion of women who espouse journalism instead of husbands can reveal itself in the most unexpected details. When Reader’s Digest India deputy editor Abha Srivastava wanted to rent an apartment in New Delhi, the landlady did not request evidence of how much she earned, as one would have expected. “She asked to speak with my father to get a list of ‘approved males who could come to visit me.’ This, when I was close to 40. The reason for such a demand? The fact that I was single and a journalist.”This is a terrible combination for Indian women, it seems.PioneersWomen journalists obviously still encounter this kind of prejudice in the workplace even if attitudes are evolving. Prior to the 1960s, newsrooms were 100% male and the pioneers had to demonstrate a great deal of perseverance.“They were gawked at and there was a lot of speculation as to how long they would survive in the taxing profession,” said Usha Rai, one of India’s first women journalists, in a survey by the Press Institute of India.They had to fight in order not to be restricted to covering so-called “feminine” stories such as flower arrangement contests or sari shows. “I spent a long time trying to shrug off my gender,” said Barkha Dutt, a well-known journalist who worked for New Delhi TV for years and now often writes for the Washington Post.“But after 22 years, here’s what I learned,” she told RSF. “I had to work twice as hard to get to the same place as my male colleagues. I had to fight for certain kinds of assignments, in particular, to cover wars and conflicts.”Sexual assaultsOffice relations sometimes get much more sordid. In 2013, a young woman journalist with the investigative magazine Tehelka described in detail how she was assaulted in a Goa hotel by her editor Tarun Tejpal. The magazine’s managing editor, Shoma Chaudhury, reacted by sending an email to her employees referring to an “untoward incident” that would be dealt with internally. The victim’s colleagues had to fight to get the case made public.There have also been cases of sexual harassment in the field. After RSF reported a wave of police violence against journalists in March, a woman journalist reported that she had been groped by a police officer. And much more serious cases have been reported, such as that of the young photojournalist who was gang-raped in a Mumbai business district in 2013.As elsewhere, the line separating verbal violence from physical violence is always very tenuous. This was seen in newspaper editor Gauri Lankesh’s murder outside her home in Bangalore last September. Like many women journalists in India, she had been the target of repeated online harassment.“Presstitutes”And like many other women journalists in India, she had been called a “presstitute,” an insult that is much used by the trolls associated with the right-wing Hindu nationalist movement from which Prime Minister Narendra Modi comes. Some politicians, including Minister of State for External Affairs V. K. Singh, also use this insult.Swati Chaturvedi, an investigative reporter who has been the victim of online harassment, described in a book entitled “I am a troll” how Prime Minister Modi’s trolls use death threats and gang-rape calls to harass women journalists whose coverage of Modi or his party annoys them.After Asianet News TV anchor Sindhu Suryakumar hosted a TV debate in 2016 in which references were made to a Hindu female deity, her phone number was posted on a WhatsApp group and she received more than 2,000 insulting phone calls and messages within the space of a few hours.Fighting backThe trolls go so far as to publish the addresses of women journalists, making them fear for their lives. This is what happened to Rana Ayyub last month, prompting RSF to refer the case to the United Nations special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions.“I am used to hate and to the state creating trouble for me,” said Ayyub, who is well known for her investigative reporting in the book she wrote about Narendra Modi, which her friend, Gauri Lankesh, translated into the Kannada language before being murdered. “But this, what they have done to me now is a new low,” she told RSF. “And I have promised myself that I will take each one of them to court, I will fight back.”India has fallen two places in RSF’s newly released 2018 World Press Freedom Index and is now ranked 138th out of 180 countries. RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 News IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence Receive email alerts June 10, 2021 Find out morecenter_img to go further Help by sharing this information In rural India, journalists face choice between covering pandemic and survival April 27, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on India News May 7, 2018 – Updated on August 23, 2019 How women have to fight to be journalists in India IndiaAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media March 3, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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RSF publishes report on media and journalism in Algeria

first_imgReports Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Related documents rapport_algerie_en_web.pdfPDF – 5.37 MB Follow the news on Algeria May 12, 2021 Find out more Harassment of Algerian reporters intensifies in run-up to parliamentary elections READ THE REPORTRSF will also give a news conference at its headquarters in Paris today to present its recommendations on Algeria, which include the immediate release of freelance journalist Hassan Bouras. A petition to call for his liberation has been launched. The report describes the progressive asphyxiation of the Algerian media since President Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s reelection for a fourth term in 2014. The death in detention on 11 December of Mohamed Tamalt, a journalist with British and Algerian dual nationality, has just made the outlook even more sombre, as it is the first time a detainee has died as a result of posting opinions on Facebook. The fight for media freedom is needed more than ever in country where corruption, politicians’ assets and the president’s health are all off limits, professional and non-professional journalists are jailed on criminal charges, broadcasting is under tight control, independent newspapers are being throttled economically and media are being financed with hidden funds. This grim situation is likely to get even worse in the run-up to legislative elections that are scheduled for April 2017. “Algeria’s journalists have fought for freedom of information with a great deal of courage and resilience since the 1990s but now, behind a facade of pluralism, authoritarian practices are undermining journalistic independence,” RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire said. “How far will the Algerian authorities go to stifle the media and those who defend it? Is it not outrageous that a journalist has died in detention in 2016 after three months in a coma while the prison system remains completely indifferent? Mehdi Benaissa and Ryad Hartouf were held arbitrarily for more than 20 days in June. Hassan Bouras, a freelance journalists and whistleblower, is still being held.” At today’s news conference, RSF will present its recommendation to the Algerian authorities and the international community on what should be done to improve freedom of information in Algeria. The most urgent measure is the release of Hassan Bouras and the withdrawal of all the charges against him. Bouras was sentenced to a year in prison on a charge of “insulting state authority” for publishing interviews with residents of El Bayadh (a city 500 km southwest of Algiers), who accused local police and judicial officials of taking bribes and jailing innocent people on the basis of completely false testimony. A petition calling for his liberation has been launched today. RSF also urges the Algerian authorities to: – Conduct an independent investigation into the circumstances of Mohamed Tamalt’s death, so that those responsible are punished without delay. – Stop using the criminal code, arbitrary detention and abusive administrative procedures to suppress and criminalize freedom of information and independent journalism. – Amend the criminal code, abolishing prison terms for media offences, including insult, contempt and defamation. – End all forms of restriction on the right to information leading to censorship of the media, including censorship of the following subjects: the president’s health, the foreign assets and bank accounts of Algeria’s leaders, corruption and social unrest. – Ensure that the procedures for granting broadcast licences and frequencies reflect the principles of fairness, pluralism and transparency, in order to strengthen the public’s right to independent news and information. When licences are refused, the grounds should be given and made public. – Ensure that media ownership is more transparent, in order to avoid concentration of news media ownership and conflicts of interest. – Support media and civil society groups that defend media freedom in Algeria, in order to encourage the existence and development of free and independent media, including community media. In the course of preparing this report, which is available hereunder, RSF conducted some 20 interviews in Algiers, Oran and Tunis from May to October 2016 with the support of the French Development Agency (AFD). READ THE REPORTPress contacts: Anne-France Renaud / [email protected] / +33 6 7592 7166 Maud Semelin / [email protected] / +33 1 4483 8482 News December 21, 2016 – Updated on December 22, 2016 RSF publishes report on media and journalism in Algeria Algeria : Reporter jailed after covering Tuareg protests in southern Algeria AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa center_img April 29, 2021 Find out more RSF_en News to go further Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is today releasing a report entitled “Algeria, the invisible hand of power over the media” that examines the situation of the media and journalism in Algeria since 2014. It is available in Arabic, French and English. Algeria pressures reporters by delaying renewal of accreditation News AlgeriaMiddle East – North Africa Organisation May 18, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Gang member gets 30 years for TV cameraman’s murder

first_img to go further News June 6, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Gang member gets 30 years for TV cameraman’s murder Covid-19 emergency laws spell disaster for press freedom Organisation El SalvadorAmericas Salvadorean authorities must not obstruct coronavirus coverage El SalvadorAmericas October 7, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts Follow the news on El Salvadorcenter_img June 12, 2020 Find out more News News News Help by sharing this information RSF_en Salvadorean president’s alarming hostility towards independent media Jonathan Martínez Castro, a “marero” (gang member) also known as “Budín,” was sentenced to 30 years in prison by a San Salvador court on 31 May for the April 2011 murder of Canal 33 cameraman Alfredo Hurtado. His alleged accomplice, Marlon Abrego Rivas, also known as “Gato,” is currently a fugitive.Martínez and Abrego are members of Mara Salvatrucha (MS 13), a feared San Salvador criminal gang and main rival of Mara 18, the gang that murdered French documentary filmmaker Christian Poveda in September 2009, a year after being the subject of Poveda’s documentary La Vida Loca.“We take note of the efforts being made by the Salvadoran police and judicial authorities to combat impunity,” Reporters Without Borders said. “El Salvador’s very high crime rate has a direct impact on civil liberties, including the freedom to report news and information. “The long sentence passed on Martínez sends a strong signal. The authorities must now shed light on the motive for Hurtado’s murder, as well as the various roles of all those involved. Last week’s conviction was a first step but others must follow.”Two gunmen shot Hurtado in cold blood while he was visiting Ilopango, on the outskirts of the capital, on 25 April 2011. He often covered “marero” arrests and MS supposedly suspected that he had identified two of its members to the police as the murderers of a gangster known as Piñata. The prosecutor’s office nonetheless claim that other MS members identified Piñata’s killers. Abrego, Hurtado’s other alleged killer, has been wanted ever since a warrant for his arrest was issued in the Piñata investigation.Members of Hurtado’s family point out that he had already been threatened by MS because of his coverage of police operations and his close relations with the police and judicial authorities in connection with his journalistic work. His Canal 33 colleagues seem to agree that this was the most likely motive. April 11, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Another journalist murdered in Honduras, no end to violence in sight

first_img Reporters Without Borders is shocked to learn that community radio journalist Hernán Cruz Barnica was murdered near Dulce Nombre, a town in the western department of Copán, on the evening of 28 May. He was shot three times in the head.Cruz hosted Otro Nivel, a daily programme about human rights in the region, for local community radio station Opoa, la Voz de la Esperanza.“We urge the authorities to do everything possible to identify those responsible for this horrible crime and bring them to trial,” said Camille Soulier, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Americas desk.“Coming less than two months after Radio Progreso employee Carlos Mejía Orellana was murdered in his home in the northern city of El Progreso on 11 April, Cruz’s murder shows that the situation for journalists continues to be very dangerous in Honduras.”Reporters Without Borders is also very concerned about the continuing threats to Alex Sabillón, the anchor of Hechos de Choloma, a local news programme broadcast by the municipal TV station in the northwestern city of Choloma, a region that has seen many attacks against media personnel in recent years.Currently under the protection of the secretariat for justice and human rights, Sabillón said he was surprised to see an individual photographing him at his home twice last week.Honduras is ranked 129th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. Help by sharing this information 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies to go further May 30, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Another journalist murdered in Honduras, no end to violence in sight HondurasAmericas News Receive email alerts HondurasAmericas RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Organisation center_img News RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America May 13, 2021 Find out more News Reports April 27, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Follow the news on Honduras December 28, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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US – #WeeklyAddress: September 9 – 15: North Carolina state senator assaults journalist, throws phone

first_img June 7, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en. United StatesAmericas September 16, 2019 US – #WeeklyAddress: September 9 – 15: North Carolina state senator assaults journalist, throws phone to go further The United States ranks 48th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index.  Denver police will strengthen First Amendment training as part of settlement for unlawful arrest of journalist Six months have passed since the last daily White House press briefing As part of a $50,000 settlement between the Denver Police Department and Colorado Independent editor Susan Greene, the police force has agreed to strengthen First Amendment training for officers through at least 2024, plus update policies on search and seizure of recording devices, The Colorado Independent reported September 10. Greene, an investigative journalist who covers police use of excessive force, had her First Amendment rights violated last year when she was handcuffed and detained for taking photos and recording an interaction between police and a man they had arrested. Officers James Brooks and Adam Paulsen ordered her to stop recording, and when she refused, they took her phone, handcuffed her, and forced her into the police car, telling her to “act like a lady.” She was released after 12 minutes and her phone was returned. As a part of the training required in the settlement, the Denver Police Department will hire the general counsel of the National Press Photographers Association to train officers on First Amendment photography rights. The session will be recorded and shown annually for officers. News BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP U.S. PRESS FREEDOM TRACKER: Amid backlash, Department of Defense backs away from new press regulations at Guantánamo Bay June 3, 2021 Find out more U.S. PRESS FREEDOM TRACKER: Media barred from public lead water crisis meeting in New Jersey April 28, 2021 Find out more News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say RSF_en News United StatesAmericas IN CASE YOU MISSED IT… California gig economy bill could unintentionally threaten journalism industry Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says September 11 marked six months since the last traditional White House press briefing. Since entering her role as White House press secretary in June, Stephanie Grisham has not once taken the podium in the James Brady Press Briefing Room to speak with the media. Former Press Secretary Sarah Sanders was the last to do so on March 11. Grisham has expressed a lack of concern for this matter, telling ABC News that “President Trump communicates directly with the American people more than any president in history.” But critics have said the president’s impromptu “chopper talks” have made it more difficult to hold the president accountable and made them look unprofessional. RSF believes the absence of traditional press briefings is upending our country’s democratic norms. North Carolina state senator assaults journalist, throws phoneState Sen. Paul Lowe of North Carolina apologized on September 11 after an altercation with a reporter in the state Legislative Building in Raleigh, according to the Greensboro News & Record. The journalist, Joe Killian, was covering the aftermath of the governor’s state budget veto for N.C. Policy Watch, an online news and commentary outlet, when he heard yelling behind a closed door. Lowe emerged from the room and asked Killian, who had begun filming, what he was doing. After Killian told him he is a journalist, Lowe engaged in a brief struggle with Killian, snatched Killian’s phone, and threw it across the room. Lowe asserted he did not break the law in the confrontation, though the state General Assembly Police Department has not determined whether charges will be filed. This incident echoes a similar confrontation in February 2019, when Capitol Police in Washington, DC, reportedly shoved journalists and blocked them from asking questions while escorting members of Congress.  Below are the most notable incidents regarding threats to press freedom in the US during the week of September 9 – 15: Receive email alerts WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists A bill California lawmakers passed on September 10 that would classify many contract workers as employees could have unintended consequences for freelance journalists and news outlets. While the law would help prevent exploitation of workers like Uber and Lyft drivers, some California newspaper editors are concerned this law would prevent them from keeping newspaper deliverers who are employed on contracts. For newspapers in small rural towns, this could severely limit their ability to circulate papers and inform readers. Troy Niday, the chief operations officer of The Santa Rosa Press Democrat, told The New York Times this law could accelerate the end of print newspaper delivery by five to seven years.  News Follow the news on United States Organisation last_img read more

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#FreePhamDoanTrang – RSF launches campaign for Vietnamese journalist’s release

first_imgNews to go further News  In the #FreePhamDoanTrang campaign video released by RSF, Vietnamese journalists, bloggers and friends now based in France, Germany, Taiwan and the United States take advantage of their exile to say what their compatriots still in Vietnam cannot say without risking long prison sentences. Help by sharing this information RSF_en December 7, 2020 – Updated on December 8, 2020 #FreePhamDoanTrang – RSF launches campaign for Vietnamese journalist’s release VietnamAsia – Pacific Activities in the fieldCondemning abuses Judicial harassmentRSF Prize Receive email alerts Determination, energy and sacrifices Insult to the idea of humanity “By signing this petition for her release, you demonstrate a commitment to press freedom in a country where all the media are strictly controlled by the communist party’s propaganda bureau. You also express your solidarity with Vietnamese civil society, which is now very active despite state censorship.” Organisation Arrested at her Ho Chi Minh City home on the night of 6 October, the co-founder of the Luat Kuoa and TheVietnamese information websites is facing a possible 20-year jail sentence on a charge of “anti-government propaganda.” VietnamAsia – Pacific Activities in the fieldCondemning abuses Judicial harassmentRSF Prize “Pham Doan Trang is an intellectual who is very committed to her country,” says Nguyen Van Dai, a blogger now living in exile in Germany after being given a 15-year jail sentence in April 2018. “Her work is closely followed by many Vietnamese activists both in Vietnam and abroad. She has written many books promoting human rights and encouraging her fellow citizens to become more aware politically.” Vietnam has languished for years near the bottom of RSF’s World Press Freedom Index and is ranked 175th out of 180 countries in the 2020 Index. Le Trung Khoa, the Berlin-based editor of the ThoiBao.de news portal, says: “Pham Doan Trang simply used her right to free speech, a right guaranteed by the Socialist Republic of Vietnam’s constitution. The reasons given by the Hanoi regime to justify her arrest are extremely vague and violate the rule of law. This is why she must be freed at once.”center_img The RSF video includes interviews with people who are close to Trang, such as her friend Nguyen Ngoc Anh, now based in France. “I am very attached to Pham Doan Trang,” she says. “Firstly because we’re friends and went to the same secondary school, and secondly because I respect her determination, her energy and the enormous sacrifices she has made in order to write articles, publish books, and share her knowledge with as many people as possible.” It‘s with the aim of avoiding a long prison sentence for Pham Doan Trang by putting pressure on the Vietnamese government that RSF is also launching its petition for the immediate and unconditional release of this courageous journalist, who was awarded the RSF Press Freedom Prize for Impact in 2019. Trinh Huu Long, a journalist who joined Trang in founding the Legal Initiatives for Vietnam NGO and the Luat Khoa et TheVietnamese news sites, says: “Doan Trang is perhaps one of the most influential journalists, most effective activists and one of the bravest individuals that we have had in Vietnam’s contemporary history, from 1975 to the present-day.” RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam Pham Doan Trang is facing a possible 20-year jail sentence on a charge of “anti-government propaganda” (photo: Thinh Nguyen / Luat Khoa). April 27, 2021 Find out more “Because of her bravery and her generosity, Pham Doan Trang has become a symbol of the fight to provide her fellow Vietnamese citizens with reliable, independent journalism,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. News Follow the news on Vietnam News Tranh Thi Nga, a blogger sentenced to nine years in prison before being forced into exile in the United States, was beaten by Vietnamese Communist Party thugs, just as Trang was. She says: “Like me, she was badly beaten on the legs, to the point of causing fractures and lasting damage. And now the Vietnamese government is using a very loosely-worded law to keep Pham Doan Trang in prison. This is a serious violation of human rights, and an insult to morality and the very idea of humanity.” April 22, 2021 Find out more Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison Two months after her arrest, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is launching a campaign for the release of Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang with a petition and a video in which Vietnamese diaspora colleagues voice strong support for this symbol of the fight for the freedom to inform in Vietnam. April 7, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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The 15 enemies of the Internet and other countries to watch

first_img Help by sharing this information Organisation Reporters Without Borders marks the World Summit on the Information Society by presenting 15 countries that are “enemies of the Internet” and pointing to a dozen others whose attitude to it is worrying. RSF_en The 15 enemies of the Internet(in alphabetical order)- BelarusThe regime uses its monopoly of the communications system to block access to opposition websites when it chooses, especially at election time. President Alexander Lukashenko dislikes criticism, as shown by the harassment in August 2005 of youngsters who were posting satirical cartoons online.- BurmaThis country is among the very worst enemies of Internet freedom and in many ways its policies are worse than China’s. The price of computers and a home Internet connection is prohibitive so Internet cafés are the target of the military regime’s scrutiny. As in neighbouring Vietnam and China, access to opposition sites is systematically blocked, in this case with technology supplied by the US firm Fortinet. Burma’s censorship is special – Web-based e-mail, such as Yahoo! or Hotmail, cannot be used and all Internet café computers record every five minutes the screen being consulted, to spy on what customers are doing. – ChinaChina was one the first repressive countries to grasp the importance of the Internet and of controlling it. It is also one of the few countries that has managed to “sanitise” the Internet by blocking access to all criticism of the regime while at the same time expanding it (China has more than 130 million users). The secret of this success is a clever mix of filter technology, repression and diplomacy. Along with effective spying and censorship technology, the regime is also very good at intimidating users and forcing them to censor their own material. China is the world’s biggest prison for cyber-dissidents, with 62 in prison for what they posted online.- CubaPresident Fidel Castro’s regime has long been good at tapping phones and these days is just as skilled when it comes to the Internet. The Chinese model of expanding the Internet while keeping control of it is too costly, so the regime has simply put the Internet out of reach for virtually the entire population. Being online in Cuba is a rare privilege and requires special permission for the ruling Communist Party. When a user does manage to get connected, often illegally, it is only to a highly-censored version of the Internet.- IranThe information ministry boasts that it currently blocks access to hundreds of thousands of websites, especially those dealing in any way with sex but also those providing any kind of independent news. A score of bloggers were thrown in prison between autumn 2004 and summer 2005. One of them, Mojtaba Saminejad, 23, has been held since February 2005 and was given a two-year sentence in June for supposedly insulting the country’s Supreme Guide, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.- LibyaWith nearly a million people online (about a sixth of the population), Libya could be a model of Internet expansion in the Arab world. But it has no independent media, so the Internet is controlled, with access blocked to dissident exile sites by filters installed by the regime, which is also now targeting cyber-dissidents, with the January 2005 arrest of former bookseller Abdel Razak al-Mansouri, who posted satirical articles on a London-based website. He was sentence in October to 18 months in prison for supposed “illegal possession of a gun.” – NepalKing Gyanendra’s first reflex when he seized power in February 2005 was to cut off Internet access to the outside world. It has since been restored, but the regime continues to control it and most online opposition publications, especially those seen as close to the Maoist rebels, have been blocked inside the country. Bloggers discussing politics or human rights do so under constant pressure from the authorities.- North KoreaThe country is the most closed-off in the world and the government, which has total control of the media, refused until recently to be connected to the Internet. Only a few thousand privileged people have access to it and then only to a heavily-censored version, including about 30 sites praising the regime. Among these is www.uriminzokkiri.com, which has photos and adulation of the “Dear Leader” Kim Jong-il and his late father Kim Il Sung.- Saudi ArabiaThe government agency in charge of “cleaning up” the Web, the Internet Service Unit (ISU), boasts that it currently bars access to nearly 400,000 sites with the aim of protecting citizens from content that is offensive or violates Islamic principles and social standards. The sites blocked deal mainly with sex, politics or religion (except those about Islam that are approved by the regime). This censorship regularly affects blogging, and blogger.com was made inaccessible for several days in October 2005.- SyriaThe accession to power of President Bashar el-Assad in 2000 raised hopes of greater freedom of expression, but these were disappointed. The regime restricts Internet access to a minority of privileged people, filters the Web and very closely monitors online activity. A Kurdish journalism student is in prison for posting photos on a foreign-based site of a demonstration in Damascus. Another Internet user was freed in August 2005 after more than two years in prison for simply passing by e-mail on a foreign-produced newsletter. Both were tortured in prison.- TunisiaPresident Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, whose family has a monopoly on Internet access inside the country, has installed a very effective system of censoring the Internet. All opposition publications are blocked, along with many other news sites. The regime also tries to discourage use of webmail because it is harder to spy on than standard mail programmes that use Outlook. The Reporters Without Borders site cannot be seen inside Tunisia. The government also jails cyber-dissidents and in April 2005, pro-democracy lawyer Mohammed Abbou was given a three-and-a-half-year sentence for criticising the president online. Yet Tunisia seems well thought-of by the international community for its management of the Internet since it has been chosen the International Telecommunication Union to host the second stage of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) in November 2005. – TurkmenistanNo independent media exists here under the dictatorship of megalomaniac Stalinist President Neparmurad Nyazov. As in Cuba and North Korea, the regime takes a radical attitude to the Internet and keeps virtually all citizens away from it, with home connections not allowed. There are no Internet cafés and the Web is only accessible through certain companies and international organisations. Even when connected, it is only to a censored version of the Internet.- UzbekistanPresident Islam Karimov proclaimed the “era of the Internet” in his country in May 2001. Online facilities have expanded rapidly but so has censorship of them. The state security service frequently asks ISPs to temporarily block access to opposition sites. Since June 2005, some Internet cafés in the capital have displayed warnings that users will be fined 5,000 soms (4 euros) for looking at pornographic sites and 10,000 (8 euros) for consulting banned political sites. – VietnamThe country closely follows the Chinese method of controlling the Internet, but though more ideologically rigid, the regime does not have the money and technology China has to do this. It has Internet police who filter out “subversive” content and spy on cybercafés. Cyber-dissidents are thrown in prison and three have been in jail for more than three years for daring to speak out online in favour of democracy.Countries to watch(in alphabetical order)- BahrainExcept for pornographic sites, Bahrain does not censor the Internet much. But it has unfortunately begun to regulate it in ways that endanger freedom of expression. The government said in April 2004 that all online publications, including forums and blogs, must be officially registered. Loud protests led to suspension of the measure but it is still on the books. Three editors of a forum were held for nearly two weeks in March 2005 for allowing “defamation” of the king to be posted.- EgyptThe government has taken steps since 2001 to control online material. Though censorship is minor, some criticism of the government is not welcome. The government seems unsure what to do about the explosion of blogs, being more used to pressuring the traditional media. A blogger was arrested for the first time in late October 2005 because of the content of his blog. – European UnionThe EU is responsible for regulating the Internet and rulings often apply to member-states. A European directive on 8 June 2000 about e-commerce proved a threat to freedom of expression, by making ISPs responsible for the content of websites they host and requiring them to block any page they consider illegal when informed of its existence. This creates a private system of justice, where the ISP is called on to decide what is illegal or not. Technicians thus do the job of a judge. The EU is now studying a proposal to oblige ISPs to retain records of customers’ online activity. The proposal could limit Internet users’ right to privacy.- KazakhstanThe media here, including the Internet, are under official pressure and control of online publications has become a key issue because many government scandals have been exposed on websites. President Nursultan Nazarbayev’s regime added new sites to its blacklist in January 2005, including that of a democratic opposition party. In October, an opposition site was forced to give up its national domain name (.kz) after officially-inspired legal action.- MalaysiaGovernment intimidation of online journalists and bloggers has increased in the past three years, notably of Malaysiakini, the country’s only independent online daily whose journalists have been threatened and its premises searched. Summonses and questioning of bloggers has been stepped up recently, leading to self-censorship that harms democracy.- SingaporeThe government does not filter the Internet much but is good at intimidating users and bloggers and website editors have very little room for manoeuvre. A blogger who criticised the country’s university system was forced to shut down his blog in May 2005 after official pressure. – South KoreaThe country is the fourth most-wired country in the world but it excessively filters the Internet, blocking mainly pornographic sites but also publications that supposedly “disturb public order,” including pro-North Korean sites. The government is very sensitive to political opinions expressed online and punishes Internet users they consider go too far. Two users were briefly detained and then fined in 2004 for posting pictures online making fun of opposition figures.- ThailandThe government filters the Internet as part of its fight against pornography and has used it to extend censorship well beyond this. The method employed is also sly, since when a user tries to access a banned site, a message comes back saying “bad gateway,” instead of the usual “access refused” or “site not found.” In June 2005, the websites of two community radio stations very critical of the government were shut down after it pressed their ISP to do so. Reporters Without Borders marks the World Summit on the Information Society by presenting 15 countries that are “enemies of the Internet” and pointing to a dozen others whose attitude to it is worrying.The 15 “enemies” are the countries that crack down hardest on the Internet, censoring independent news sites and opposition publications, monitoring the Web to stifle dissident voices, and harassing, intimidating and sometimes imprisoning Internet users and bloggers who deviate from the regime’s official line. The “countries to watch” do not have much in common with the “enemies of the Internet.” The plight of a Chinese Internet user, who risks prison by mentioning human rights in an online forum, does not compare with the situation of a user in France or the United States. Yet many countries that have so far respected online freedom seem these days to want to control the Internet more. Their often laudable aims include fighting terrorism, paedophilia and Internet-based crime, but the measures sometimes threaten freedom of expression. – United StatesUS policy towards the Internet is important because it is the country where the Internet began. But its laws about interception of online traffic do not provide enough privacy guarantees for users. Leading US Internet firms such as Yahoo!, Cisco Systems and Microsoft are also working with censorship authorities in China, thus throwing doubt on the US commitment to freedom of expression. The United States, home of the First Amendment, the Internet and blogs, should be a model for respecting the rights of Internet users. – ZimbabweThe local media says the government is about to take delivery of Chinese equipment and technology to spy on the Internet. The state telecoms monopoly TelOne asked ISPs in June 2004 to sign contracts allowing it to monitor e-mail traffic and requiring them to take steps to stop illegal material being posted. Since political opposition seems to be regarded as illegal by President Robert Mugabe, this is bad news for the country’s Internet users. November 17, 2005 – Updated on January 25, 2016 The 15 enemies of the Internet and other countries to watch News – The MaldivesThe archipelago is a paradise for tourists but a nightmare for cyber-dissidents. The 25-year regime of President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom cracks down harshly on freedom of expression. Several opposition websites are filtered and one of four people arrested in 2002 is still in prison for helping to produce an e-mailed newsletter. A British company, Cable & Wireless, controls Internet access in the country.last_img read more

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Young independent journalist jailed arbitrarily in Chechnya

first_imgЧитать по-русски в PDF и ниже / Read in Russian June 2, 2021 Find out more “This trumped-up case against Zhalaudi Geriyev must be overturned,” said Johann Bihr, the head of the Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk at Reporters Without Borders (RSF). Two Russian journalists persecuted for investigating police corruption Organisation Очередной независимый журналист был безосновательно приговорен к тюремному заключению в Чечне The prosecution claimed that Geriyev was arrested in possession of more than 150 grams of cannabis that he was about to smoke. But the case was riddled with contradictions and procedural violations. May 21, 2021 Find out more Independent journalism has been almost completely eradicated in Chechnya, an autonomous Russian republic that was traumatized by two bloody wars and has been ruled with an iron hand by Kadyrov since 2007. The three-year jail sentence that Chechen journalist Zhalaudi Geriyev received on a charge of drug possession on 5 September was clearly a politically-motivated punishment for his reporting and, as such, wasthe latest offensive in Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov’s war against independent journalism. Независимая журналистика была практически уничтожена в Чеченской республике, которая сильно пострадала в двух кровопролитных войнах, и с 2007 г. управляется жесткой рукой Рамзана Кадырова. Оставшееся безнаказанным убийство знаменитой журналистки и правозащитницы Натальи Эстемировой, застреленной в 2009 году, еще больше укрепило атмосферу страха в республике. “Репортеры без границ” дважды описывали это положение вещей, в исследованиях, проведенных в 2009 и в 2011 годах. Последние из журналистов, которые осмеливаются в своей деятельности не следовать навязываему властями единогласию и энтузиазму вынуждены терпеть постоянные угрозы и предупреждения, давление на своих родственников и близких. Травля тех, кто открыто критикует власти особенно усилилась за последний год: любые комментарии в социальных сетях теперь могут привести к самым тяжелым последствиям. Похищения публичных персон, чья позиция не вписывается в официальную линию становятся все более частым явлением. Так, политолог Руслан Мартагов, критически отзывавшийся о положении с правами человека в республике, “пропал” с 1 по 3 сентября. Два академика, похищенные в конце марта и в апреле, появились вновь после того как публично принесли извинения; еще один был отпущен после пыток и теперь ни с кем не контактирует. Согласно официальной версии, Жалауди Гериев был задержан, имея при себе более 150 г конопли, которую он приобрел для своего потребления. Однако материалы дела содержат многочисленные противоречия и процессуальные нарушения. В частности, суд проигнорировал показания свидетелей защиты, согласно которым Гериев был похищен тремя мужчинами в штатском во время поездки в маршрутном такси, на котором он ехал в Грозный, откуда он должен был вылететь в Москву по работе. На заседании суда, Гериев рассказал, что похитившие его лица отвели его в лес, где избивали, пытали и допрашивали его, после чего отобрали рюкзак и отвезли на кладбище села Курчалой, где он был арестован на основании “признания”. Чеченский журналист Жалауди Гериев был приговорен 5 сентября 2016 г к трем годам тюрьмы. За официальным мотивом приговора – “хранение наркотиков”, нетрудно разглядеть политическую мотивацию этого приговора. Журналист был фактически наказан за свою профессиональную деятельность, что стало очередным этапом в войне против независимой журналистики, которую ведет Глава Чеченской Республики Рамзан Кадыров. “His conviction is the latest example of the mounting harassment of the few remaining independent journalists in Chechnya. With Moscow’s blessing, Ramzan Kadyrov’s regime is plunging ever deeper into a spiral of repression. Russia, which itself shows little respect for media freedom, encourages the continuing existence of this black spot where it has become nearly impossible for journalists to operate.” The court systematically ignored defence testimony confirming that three plainclothesmen kidnapped Geriyev from a minibus that was taking him from a town in the interior of Chechnya to the capital, Grozny, from where he had planned to travel to Moscow for work-related reasons. Any journalist nowadays daring to defy the official consensus and obligatory pro-government enthusiasm is warned or threatened, and pressure is put on relatives. Harassment of critics has intensified in the past year. The least comment on social networks is now liable to have dire consequences. Постоянно растущее давление на критиков Россия занимает 148-ое место из 180 в рейтинге свободы прессы в мире 2016 года, который составляют “Репортеры без границ”. News A new threshold was crossed when a minibus carrying Russian and foreign journalists and members of the Committee for the Prevention of Torture was attacked in neighbouring Ingushetia, just a few hundred metres from the Chechen border, on 9 March of this year. A score of masked men beat the passengers, forced them get out of the bus, and then set fire to it. Related documents cp_geriyev_ru.pdfPDF – 99.84 KB Kadyrov often describes independent journalists and members of Russia’s liberal opposition as “traitors” and “enemies of the people.” September 8, 2016 – Updated on September 9, 2016 Young independent journalist jailed arbitrarily in Chechnya Facebook Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Жалауди Гериев – молодой сотрудник независимого информационного портала “Кавказский узел”. В своем решении от 5 сентября, Шалинский районный суд Чечни признал его виновным в хранении наркотиков. Обвинительный приговор преимущественно опирается на собственное признание журналиста, которое было получено от него при помощи угроз, и от которого он отказался в ходе слушаний. Russia is ranked 148th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index.—————————————- News “Обвинения в отношении Жалауди Гериева – полностью сфабрикованы, и должны быть сняты” – заявил Йоханн Бир, глава отдела Восточной Европы и Центральной Азии в организации “Репортеры без границ” – “Уголовное дело и обвинительный приговор против него являются очередным примером растущего давления на то, что осталось от независимой журналистики в Чечне. С благословления Москвы, режим Рамзана Кадырова все дальше и дальше усиливает репрессии. Россия, страна в целом не особо заботящаяся о свободе прессы, способствует сохранению в стране темной зоны, где работа журналиста стала невозможна.” Geriyev told the court that his abductors took him to a wood where they beat him, tortured him and interrogated him. They then confiscated his backpack and took him to a cemetery on the outskirts of the village of Kurchaloi, where they finally extracted his “confession” and placed him under arrest. Escalating harassment of critics RussiaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Judicial harassmentPredatorsViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeCitizen-journalistsInternet Житель высокогорного села, опубликовавший в мае видео, в котором жаловался на условия жизни в селе и на бездействие местных властей, в итоге принес личные извинения Рамзану Кадырову. Этому предшествовала кампания организованной травли, в ходе которой ему сожгли дом а соседи указали на него что он “враг”. В декабре 2015 года президент Чечни вынудил женщину, негативно отзывавшуюся о нем в разговоре в Whatsapp, давать унизительные “объяснения” по государственному телевидению. The complete impunity with which well-known journalist and human rights defender Natalya Estemirova was murdered in 2009 reinforced the climate of fear that reigns in the region, one that RSF described in two successive reports in 2009 and 2011. A young contributor to the independent news website Kavkazsky Uzel, Geriyev was convicted by Chechnya’s Shali district court almost solely on the basis of a forced confession that he retracted during the trial. Имитация судебного процесса RussiaEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesOnline freedoms Judicial harassmentPredatorsViolenceImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeCitizen-journalistsInternet News Public figures of all kinds are liable to be abducted. Ruslan Martagov, a political analyst critical of the human rights situation in Chechnya, “disappeared” from 1 to 3 September. Two academics were kidnapped in late March and early April only to reappear and make public “apologies.” A third, tortured and then released, now leads thelife of a recluse. Давшение вышло на новый уровень 9 марта, когда было совершено нападение на микроавтобус, в котором ехали российские и иностранные журналисты, а также правозащитники из Комитета против пыток. Около двадцати человек в масках напали на автобус в Ингушетии, в нескольких стах метров от границы Чечни, высадив пассажиров из автобуса и избив их, а автобус сожгли. Рамзан Кадыров регулярно указывает пальцем на независимых журналистов и российскую либеральную оппозицию, о которых отзывается как о “предателях” и “врагах народа”. Sham trial Receive email alerts The resident of a remote mountain village who, in a video posted online in May, complained about conditions in the village and the lack of interest by the authorities ended up apologizing to Kadyrov after a campaign of harassment in which his home was set on fire and neighbours branded him as an “enemy.” A woman who had criticized Kadyrov on Whatsapp was forced by the president to deliver a humiliating “explanation” of her behaviour on state television in December 2015. RSF_en Help by sharing this information to go further News Follow the news on Russia Listed as a “foreign agent”, Russia’s most popular independent website risks disappearing May 5, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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