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Wind-driven export of Weddell Sea slope water

first_imgThe export of waters from the Weddell Gyre to lower latitudes is an integral component of the southern subpolar contribution to the three-dimensional oceanic circulation. Here we use more than 20 years of repeat hydrographic data on the continental slope on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and 5 years of bottom lander data on the slope at 1000 m to show the intermittent presence of a relatively cold, fresh, westward flowing current. This is often bottom-intensified between 600 and 2000 dbar with velocities of over 20 cm s−1, transporting an average of 1.5 ± 1.5 Sv. By comparison with hydrography on the continental slope within the Weddell Sea and modeled tracer release experiments we show that this slope current is an extension of the Antarctic Slope Current that has crossed the South Scotia Ridge west of Orkney Plateau. On monthly to interannual time scales the density of the slope current is negatively correlated (r > 0.6 with a significance of over 95%) with eastward wind stress over the northern Weddell Sea, but lagging it by 6–13 months. This relationship holds in both the high temporal resolution bottom lander time series and the 20+ year annual hydrographic occupations and agrees with Weddell Sea export variability observed further east. We compare several alternative hypotheses for this wind stress/export relationship and find that it is most consistent with wind-driven acceleration of the gyre boundary current, possibly modulated by eddy dynamics, and represents a mechanism by which climatic perturbations can be rapidly transmitted as fluctuations in the supply of intermediate-level waters to lower latitudes.last_img read more

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Utah Cross Country Ready For BYU Autumn Classic

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Saturday, the Utah women’s cross country team will compete at the BYU Autumn Classic at the East Bay Golf Course in Provo.Citing the fact that this will be the site of the NCAA Mountain Regional meet later this season, Utah head coach Kyle Kepler looks forward to how valuable of an experience this meet can be for his squad.The Utes are coming off of the CSI Invitational at Idaho Falls, Idaho last Friday, which saw them earn the team title with 28 points.This meet also commemorates the first one of the season for redshirt junior Caitlin Faust of Stone Mountain, Ga.Faust participated in four meets last season, including the Pac-12 championships, which saw her place 70th overall.Also competing for the Utes on Saturday will be senior Hannah Allred of Ogden, Utah, junior Anna Busatto of Treviso, Italy, senior Makenzie Clark of Bountiful, Utah and Woods Cross High School, junior Nicole Griffiths of Beaverton, Ore., senior Megan Killian of West Jordan, Utah and West Jordan High School, redshirt sophomore Ashley Licata of Mission Viejo, Calif., sophomore Astrid Lindgren of Salt Lake City’s Rowland Hall-St. Mark’s High School and senior Sadie Wassum of Worland, Wyo. Tags: Anna Busatto/Ashley Licata/Astrid Lindgren/BYU Autumn Classic/Caitlin Faust/CSI Invitational/East Bay Golf Course/Hannah Allred/Kyle Kepler/Makenzie Clark/Megan Killian/Nicole Griffiths/Sadie Wassum/Utah Cross Country Brad James September 11, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah Cross Country Ready For BYU Autumn Classiclast_img read more

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Admiral Kasatonov frigate joins Russian Navy fleet

first_img July 21, 2020, by Admiral Kasatonov frigate joins Russian Navy fleet As informed, the ship arrived there to take part in Russia’s Main Naval Parade. Project 22350 frigates displace 5,000 tons, measure 135 meters in length and have a cruising range of 4,500 miles. View post tag: Project 22350 Photo: Russian Ministry of Defense View post tag: Russian Navy The commissioning follows the completion of state trials in the Barents, White and Baltic seas. Vessels “The frigate Admiral Kasatonov, which successfully completed state trials, has been accepted for service in the navy…. The navy has received one more ship capable of effectively fulfilling assigned missions in long-distance maritime and oceanic zones,” Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy Admiral Nikolai Evmenov said. Share this articlecenter_img Naida Hakirevic The frigate was designed by the Severnoe Design Bureau and built at the Severnaya Verf shipyard. Back to overview,Home naval-today Admiral Kasatonov frigate joins Russian Navy fleet The acceptance and flag-raising ceremony for the newbuilding took place in the Neva roadstead, St. Petersburg, on July 21, the Russian Ministry of Defense said. Admiral Gorshkov, the lead ship of Project 22350, was commissioned in 2018. All vessels are planned to be completed by 2025. Photo: Russian Ministry of Defense View post tag: Admiral Kasatonov The Russian Navy has commissioned Admiral Kasatonov (431), the second Project 22350, Admiral Gorshkov-class missile frigate. View post tag: Frigatelast_img read more

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Wadham SU will fund students’ travel to Gender Identity clinics

first_imgWadham College SU has passed a motion to cover students’ travel to Gender Identity Clinics.The SU, which is equavalent to a JCR, is now mandated to introduce a fund for these travel costs, to which £150 will be added every term.The motion, which passed unanimously, states: “Transgender-related healthcare remains one of the most difficult forms of care to access: there are only eight Gender Identity Clinics (GICs) on the NHS, which cover the whole of the UK.”GICs provide psychological counselling, speech and language therapy, and hormones, among other services.The motion noted that waiting times for GICs can be extremely long, the shortest in the UK being at the Sheffield clinic, where the average waiting time is 51 weeks.In Northamptonshire, the waiting times can range from two to three years.Furthermore, the motion noted that these waiting lists are often subject to “absurd” rules that can impact a patients’ ranking on them.The motion stated: “Patients are often not made aware of how their actions affect their place on the waiting list, and actions like seeing a private consultant can result in their being returned to the bottom.“Because of the extreme length of waiting lists and the absurd bureaucracy involved, patients exercise very little control over the circumstances of their referral, including its date and location.“[T]he current kafkaesque state of the UK’s trans-related healthcare is unsustainable, and we as an SU should support causes that seek to improve it.”The students can now use the surplus either “inside or outside of term time.”Because the fund is limited to £150, the allotment is on a sliding scale. If fewer than three people apply for the fund, each will receive up to £50. If between three and five people apply, each will get up to £30. If over five people apply, each will get up to £30 until the fund is depleted.The motion also resolved to “donate £100 to the Oxford chapter of Action for Trans Health, in recognition of the work they do to provide trans patients with a voice in the healthcare system.”Since the motion was passed, the SU trans officer is now mandated to “promote this fund, and to advertise it alongside the College’s own funds for unexpected hardship and travel.”Wadham College is the first to introduce a fund of this kind. It was also the first college to have a trans officer, a position instituted in the 2016-17 academic year.The two Wadham students who proposed the motion declined Cherwell’s requests for comment.last_img read more

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Mother’s Day Brunch

first_imgBring mom to Mother’s Day Brunch at the historic Flanders Hotel. Enjoy a buffet with an Omlette Station, Strip Loin of Beef & Turkey Carving Stations, Lobster Sacchetti, Seared Salmon, Desserts, and more! Reservations are required and can be made by calling (609) 399-1000.last_img

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Phil Lesh Is Playing Four Free Shows This Week With Neal Casal, Cass McCombs, & More

first_imgToday, Phil Lesh revealed that he will be playing a string of four free shows this week at his venue, Terrapin Crossroads, in San Rafael, California. Dubbed the “Dead of Winter,” Lesh’s run at Terrapin Crossroads will see the Grateful Dead bassist inviting a number of other high-profile musicians during the bar performances, including the likes of Cass McCombs, Neal Casal (Chris Robinson Brotherhood and Circles Around The Sun), Stu Allen, Adam MacDougall, Dan “Lebo” Lebowitz, Grahame Lesh, Ross James, Scott Guberman, and Alex Koford.EXCLUSIVE: Neal Casal Talks CRB, LSD, & The Future Of Circles Around The SunPhil Lesh’s “Dead of Winter” bar show run at Terrapin Crossroads starts tonight and continues across the 9th, 10th, and 11th of January.[Photo: Bob Schultz]last_img read more

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Kroc Institute helps Colombia implement milestone peace accord

first_imgNotre Dame prides itself on being a research institution and one of its research projects is having a direct, real-time impact on international peace affairs.The Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies has been using its academic research on peace accords to work with the nation of Colombia to monitor and track the implementation of its peace accord throughout the country.The Colombia Final Agreement Peace Accord was approved and passed in November 2016 by the Colombian government under President Juan Manuel Santos. This followed a ceasefire signed earlier that year by the government and the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC), the largest guerrilla rebel group in Colombia. The accord ended Latin America’s longest-running insurgency and was deemed worthy of a Nobel Peace Prize.The Kroc Institute’s part in this historical event is outlined in section 6.3.2 of the Colombia Final Agreement Peace Accord itself, which states the institute is to “design the methodology for identifying the progress of the agreements” and “provide the technical support for the follow-up, verification and monitoring of the implementation of the agreements.” Playing such a direct role in the peace agreement puts the Kroc Institute’s researchers in a unique position — though they are neutral academics, they have a great responsibility toward an entire nation that uses their research to directly implement peace in a country torn apart by internal conflicts since the mid-1960s.“This is really historic, this project,” David Cortright, director of the Peace Accords Matrix (PAM) Project, said. “First time it’s ever been done, and it could be a model. If it works well, it could be a model for peace accords in the future with an objective academic monitoring system.”The current Kroc Institute PAM team is divided between seven members based at Notre Dame’s main campus and about 30 people based in Colombia who work with over 300 Colombian partners, including think tanks, government institutions and civil society groups. Both parts of the team work collaboratively to monitor the progress of peace implementation throughout the nation. Every month, findings are summarized in reports presented to the International Accompaniment, an NGO the PAM project is a part of and the Colombian government, including the offices of the presidency and vice presidency.Implementation progress is measured from a zero to three scale, with zero being no implementation and three being successful implementation. After a thorough reading of the 310 pages of the accord, the PAM team identified 578 measurable stipulations, or concrete, actionable items. Each of those items is ranked on a monthly basis using the scale and is included in the reports.The Kroc Institute’s research on peace accords predates its involvement with Colombia’s peace process. The earliest form of this research was the Peace Accords Matrix database, the brainchild of John Darby, a former professor at the Kroc Institute. Darby, who taught comparative ethnic conflict, wanted a systematic way to compare what provisions worked well in certain peace processes. He enlisted the help of his students to gather and organize data to be used in a possible database of comparative peace accords, and the effort eventually grew into a serious project he presented at a Kroc Institute research conference in 2003 under the formal name “Peace Accords Matrix database.”Following this formal launching of the PAM database, a researcher named Madhav Joshi joined the Kroc Institute in 2010 and restarted the PAM project by writing a codebook to identify provisions being negotiated in the peace accords being studied. Joshi hypothesized that the implementation of provisions, rather than the provisions themselves, were the driving force for peace-building success in the host country, and fundamentally changed the PAM project to focus on implementation.“The animal that we created is very different from the animal John Darby envisioned back then,” Joshi, who is now the current associate director of the PAM Project, said.Joined by Jason Quinn, PAM’s current principal researcher, in 2012, Joshi continued to produce research to empirically examine his hypothesis.“We are the only database that examines different provisions being negotiated in comparative peace accords, and to what extent those provisions were implemented within 10 years’ time,” Joshi said. “We are still the only database. And we have all this information available in qualitative and quantitative form on our website, so it is publicly accessible.”With a growing research presence, the two also began facilitating peace processes in Nepal, the Philippines, Myanmar, South Sudan, Yemen and Syria. Mediators and negotiators from around the world came across Joshi and Quinn’s work and began asking them about best practices for implementing peace accords as well as advice based on the comparative data they gathered.The PAM project’s partnership with Colombia, called the Colombia Barometer project, came about through two men whose work directly connected Colombia and Notre Dame. Years before the signing of the ceasefire in 2016, John Paul Lederach, Professor Emeritus of International Peacebuilding at the Kroc Institute, and Francisco Diez, PAM’s Latin American Representative whose former jobs included Chief of Staff of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Argentina and adviser to Argentinian President Raúl Alfonsín, had done extensive research and peace-related work in Colombia. The two were well-connected in Colombia and were able to bring the PAM team’s work to the attention of the mediators working on the development of the Colombian peace treaty, as well as many other people involved in the peace process.By the time the ceasefire was signed in 2016, the Kroc Institute had already been providing consistent, implementation-focused mediation support in Colombia for years. That involvement led to the Kroc Institute’s key role in the peace agreement.“We were the only project in the world that measured implementation,” Quinn said. “So when they got ready to sign their agreement, we were in the perfect spot. We were the only ones that did implementation, they already knew us and they already liked us. So we proposed the idea of monitoring the whole agreement, which [was] something that [had] never been done before.”For Colombia, the partnership promised an innovative peace agreement that could use regularly updated academic research to actively assess efficiency and even make improvements to the implementation process based on the updated analysis provided. For the Kroc Institute, it offered the first-ever chance to monitor a peace agreement’s implementation in real time, on a monthly basis from start to finish, Elise Ditta, a research associate for the PAM project, said. It also afforded the unprecedented opportunity for the PAM project to have a team in the country of study with direct access to everyone in charge of implementing the accord, including chief policy-makers in Colombia.One important contribution made by the PAM team happened just a few months after the ceasefire was signed. In October 2016, an initial version of the accord was voted down by less than a one percent margin in a public referendum. Without an alternative plan, Santos turned to the PAM team for advice on how to proceed with the accord, Joshi said. The team, in response, crafted a research brief outlining how other peace accords that had been voted down went through an effective re-negotiation process.“We examined different peace processes around the world and how parties found a way to reconcile their differences when there was significant opposition to the negotiated peace accord,” Joshi said. “So they went back to that negotiation table in Havana, [Cuba], the FARC and the government and some of the key opposing actors. … They identified key issues … and instead of going to the referendum again, [in keeping with] our advice, they went to Congress.”The final version of the accord was passed by the Colombian government a few months later in November.Another contribution the PAM team made was a list of stipulations that would be easier to implement. To do this, they chose a number of items from the list of stipulations ranked “0,” and gave this list to the government. As a result, the government has started working on those items at a higher rate.“I think having somebody who knocks on your door every month and asks, ‘How are you doing on these 10 commitments?’ probably motivates people to act,” Ditta said.The most recent major development in the PAM project occurred two weeks ago, when the PAM team based in South Bend made a group trip to Bogotá, Colombia from Sept. 4 to Sept. 9. A major objective for the trip was meeting with members of the government under Iván Duque Márquez, the new Colombian president who was elected in the summer and took office in August.“Since our role is so related to interacting with the government and other actors in Colombia, a large part of the trip was to talk and strategize about, ‘What’s our project going to look like with the new presidential administration?’” Ditta said. “[It was] strategic planning at both the political level and the operational level.”Having this conversation was important because Márquez had been part of the opposition that voted against the initial version of the peace accord in October 2016, Carolina Serrano Idrovo, a research associate on the PAM team, said.The strategic planning involves figuring out what types of reports the new administration wants, what other products they might need and who is willing to support their mission.“We need to know, ‘Who are our current allies in government?’” Joshi said. “We need to nurture our relations to suggest the relevance of this project.”In addition to those conversations, Joshi, Quinn and Diez met with Rodrigo Rivera Salazar, the new High Commissioner for Peace to discuss ongoing negotiations with the Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN), another rebel group still at war with the government.“That fact [that the new administration] is still interested in having people from the Kroc Institute come, give advice and understanding to the situation is, I think, very positive,” Serrano said.The successful implementation of the peace treaty would be a huge milestone for Colombia, Quinn said, but it is also an exciting academic prospect for the Kroc Institute.“The singer of the Colombia Barometer project is the dataset,” Quinn said. “Once the Colombia process is over in a few years … the data set will live on. Right now, there is no detailed data set on the implementation of everything in a peace agreement. … In the future, students and academics can use the data to help negotiate and implement successful peace agreements.”Tags: Colombia Final Agreement Peace Accord, Colombia peace accord, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, peacelast_img read more

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Another Coal Plant Closes in Upper Midwest

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wisconsin Public Radio:An energy company is shuttering another coal-fired power plant in Wisconsin. WEC Energy is closing its plant in Green Bay, and it comes on the heels of the company closing another facility in Pleasant Prairie.The Green Bay closure isn’t a surprise, the company announced its plans to shutter the plant last year. But now the company has come out with an updated timeline, saying after 90 years of operation, the Pulliam Power Plant in Green Bay will “retire” by the end of 2018. WEC is the parent company of We Energies — which announced earlier this week it will close its plant in Pleasant Prairie — and Wisconsin Public Service, which runs the Pulliam plant.WPS Spokesman Matt Cullen said market forces are also behind the decision to close Pulliam by the end of next year. Low natural gas prices and large-scale solar are making coal less cost effective, Cullen said. He said WEC is making a company-wide effort to move to cleaner energy sources such as solar and wind.“We’re pursuing the purchase from a developer of utility-scale solar. Also, WPS is one of three utilities here in the state who has reached an agreement to purchase the Forward Wind Energy Center down in the Fond Du Lac area.”Cullen said that wind development could generate 57 megawatts of electricity.Forty-six employees work at the Green Bay plant, and Cullen said it’s too early to tell what will happen to those employees once the plant closes.Pulliam, named after J.P. Pulliam, a past president of the company, was built in 1927 and sits at the mouth of the Fox River on the western shore of Green Bay.More: Green Bay’s Pulliam Plant Will ‘Retire’ By End Of 2018 Another Coal Plant Closes in Upper Midwestlast_img read more

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Comfort Strengthens Partnership with Grenada Following Successful Medical Mission

first_imgBy U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Brendan Fitzgerald October 02, 2019 The Comfort team is comprised of military and civilian personnel from U.S. and partner nations, including Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Peru, as well as several nongovernmental organizations capable of delivering medical assistance, humanitarian assistance, subject matter exchanges, and partnership building.During the visit, Comfort’s U.S. Navy and civilian engineers provided a Grenadian hospital with cylinders of oxygen that were critical to helping patients. The engineers also worked with hospital staff to repair the facility’s oxygen generation plant, which was inoperable for about two years.“An oxygen generation plant is significant to the care of many patients,” said U.S. Navy Captain Patrick Amersbach, commanding officer, Medical Treatment Facility. “This was something we could do to help support not only the hospital, but the people of Grenada.”During Comfort’s six-day medical mission in St. George’s, 800 medical professionals of the U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army, and U.S. Public Health Service alongside eight partner nations, provided care for 5,060 patients at two separate shore-based medical sites and performed 96 surgeries aboard the ship.“Men and women from Grenada and the United States working together for the betterment of the people — I think that is the most touching part of this,” said Nickolas Steele, the Grenadian minister for health, social security, and international business. “That is the enduring message of us working together.” U.S. Navy Lt. Alan Chambers, a nurse, hands a woman a cup of water following her surgery aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) as the ship is anchored off the coast of St. George’s, Grenada, Sept. 15, 2019. Comfort is working with health and government partners in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean to provide care on the ship and at land-based medical sites, helping to relieve pressure on national healthcare systems, including those strained by an increase in cross-border migrants. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Morgan K. Nall)last_img read more

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FCC should ensure blocked callers are notified immediately

first_imgCUNA continued its engagment with the Federal Communications Commission by sending a joint letter supporting FCC’s goals of eliminating illegal automated calls but working to ensure consumers receive important, time-sensitive calls from financial institutions, healthcare providers and other legitimate entities. CUNA has long called on the FCC to ensure legitimate calls to consumers not fall under the agency’s efforts to eliminate illegal robocalls.“These calls include, for example, safety alerts, fraud alerts, data security breach notifications, product recall notices, healthcare and prescription reminders, power outage updates, and other necessary account updates needed to maintain financial health,” the letter reads. “It is critical for consumers that these calls be completed without delay, and that the caller and call recipient are notified immediately when a call is blocked. When those calls are blocked, the Commission’s rules should ensure that businesses can promptly have the block removed.”Specifically, CUNA and the other organizations call for modifications to the FCC’s June 25 Draft Order providing a safe harbor for voice service providers that block calls based on “reasonable analytics designed to identify unwanted calls,” as long as the analytics incorporates call authentication information into the blocking decision. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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