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Shaun Perry – CA Brive, Bristol and England

first_imgShaun PerryWhen Shaun Perry was at Bristol, he took half and hour out to talk to Rugby World about cooking, phobias, early memories and what its like to wear an England shirt.RUGBY WORLD: So how are you finding life in the England squad?SHAUN PERRY: It’s going really well. It was a bit overwhelming coming into training with guys like Charlie Hodgson, Martin Corry and Lewis Moody – they’ve got so many caps between them. But I’m enjoying it. They’re a good bunch of lads and I get on really well with them all.RW: Do you get any stick from the lads at Bristol about your rise into the England squad?SP: Yeah, it’s mainly from Ronnie [Mark Regan]. Every time I wear any England gear, he’s like, ‘Look at you with your rose!’ I’ve got a bit of stick from Dave Hilton as well, and Matt Salter – you wouldn’t expect it from him, would you?Jokers, Early morning gym sessions, Flatmate… RW: So who are the jokers at Bristol?SP: Gareth Llewellyn likes a joke, and Ronnie and Salts. They do things like using your towel or hiding your boots or putting things in your shoes – Dan Ward-Smith is a pain in the arse for that. We don’t really play serious practical jokes, but I heard this story about someone at another club cementing two garden gnomes in another player’s drive so they couldn’t get their car out in the morning!RW: What’s the best thing about being a professional rugby player?SP: Just being able to do something I enjoy doing. Rugby was always a hobby for me and now it’s my job.RW: And the worst?SP: Probably having to get up really early to go to the gym for a weights session. You have to get up at 6.45am, have your breakfast, then be there by 8am. Doing a full-body then isn’t great – you’re not really awake!RW: Bristol started pre-season training way back in June, but the early start seems to have paid off?SP: Yeah, it has. We managed to get three solid weeks of fitness training done and we started the season really well. We won’t get carried away with ourselves, though. We finished 11th in the Premiership last year and the aim is to finish higher than that this season.RW: You share a house with Bristol No 8 Dan Ward-Smith. So, what’s a normal night like round at yours?SP: We just like to chill out. We take it in turns to cook and whoever’s cooking does everything – buys the stuff, cooks it and washes up. So the other person can just do nothing – watch TV or do whatever. It works really well. My speciality is Cantonese chicken – and it’s quite easy! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leggings, Arachnophobia and an embarressing trip to Paris…RW: The latest fashion craze among rugby players appears to be leggings. Do you wear them?SP: Yeah, they’re comfy! Admittedly, you do look a bit of an idiot if you’re walking down the street after training with your leggings and shorts on. You do get a few dodgy looks off people.RW: Do you have any phobias?SP: I’m not keen on spiders, or heights. I’m crap at heights. I went to Paris with my missus, Kimberley, and we were going to go to the top of the Eiffel Tower. You get a lift that takes you halfway up, then you have to walk round the edge and get another lift to the top. I got halfway up and couldn’t go any further. I had to get the lift back down!RW: What’s your earliest memory?SP: Oh, I don’t know – playing football for my school when I was eight. I get knocked on the head every week so I can’t remember much!RW: When did you last laugh?SP: Probably about an hour ago. I was playing table tennis with Mark Cueto and he’s rubbish!Keep up to date on Shauns movements, check out his profile at CA Brive Check out Shaun’s try against New Zealand on his international debut for England…Learn more about Shaun’s teammates at England…Jonny Wilkinsoncenter_img Dylan Hartley James Haskelllast_img read more

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BBC secures Six Nations contract to 2017

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Philip Bernie (L) and John FeehanThe RBS 6 Nations championship will be broadcast on the BBC up to and including the 2017 tournament, following a new deal announced today by BBC Sport and the Six Nations Council. The new deal extends BBC Sport’s current contract, as exclusive live broadcaster of the Six Nations, which runs until 2013 and covers TV, radio and online.This year’s tournament saw audiences increase to their highest level for 13 years, with an average audience of 4.7m per match. This continued the trend of year on year growth and in total over 30m people within the British Isles watched some of this year’s tournament. BBC Director of Sport, Barabara Slater said: “ The Six Nations is a crown jewel in the sporting calendar and we’re delighted that we can continue to bring the tournament to our audiences. Viewing figures continue to grow year on year and we look forward to continuing to work in partnership with the Six Nations to build interest even further through the BBC’s unparalleled offering of TV, radio, online and interactive services.”John Feehan, Chief Executive of the RBS 6Nations said: ‘We are delighted that BBC Sport will maintain, extend and enhance its coverage of the RBS 6 Nations, the world’s biggest annual rugby tournament, for a further four years to March 2017. The RBS 6 Nations is a major sporting event combining traditional rugby values with modern means of fans’ support, this could not be possible without the support of BBC Sport, RBS and our other partners and broadcasters,’”last_img read more

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Warren Gatland names his Lions 23 to face the All Blacks in the First Test

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Warren Gatland has always been his own man, unafraid to make the big selection calls, and again, he has surprised many with his picks for the First Test against the All Blacks in Auckland on Saturday night.Arguably, the biggest call comes at full-back, where Gatland has plumped for Liam Williams over the more defensively minded Leigh Halfpenny. It was only months ago when Gatland’s assistant coach, Rob Howley said Williams was a better left-wing –  but his cutting edge against the Chiefs, where he set up Jared Payne to cross the whitewash, and a very strong Series against the All Blacks 12 months ago, appear to have earned him the nod.X-Factor: Liam Williams provide excitement running from deepThat’s not the only bold call. Star of 2013, George North has been left out of the 23 altogether, after showing little appetite for the ball on this tour and in his place comes Elliot Daly, who offers a howitzer of left-boot from over 50 metres, rapier pace and a sharp footballing brain. The back-three is completed by Anthony Watson, probably the only man who could match All Black flyer Reiko Ioane in a footrace.In midfield, the form centres, Jonathan Davies and Ben Te’o are selected to add bulk, defensive organisation and the ability to punch holes, with Te’o in particular, expected to test out Beauden Barrett‘s appetite for defending the 10-12 channel, while Davies will look to nullify Sonny Bill’s offloading game.At half-back, as expected Owen Farrell has recovered from a quad strain, where he will be expected to dictate play alongside Conor Murray, with their tactical kicking, looking to test the All Blacks in the wide channels.Dynamism: Maro Itoje and Kyle Sinckler will provide plenty of power from the benchIn the backrow, Peter O’Mahony, who was struggling for a place in the Ireland set-up only in March, captains the side, with his work at the back of the lineout and unseen graft around the breakdown fundamental to the Lions’ equilibrium at the base of the scrum. Sean O’Brien‘s power and dynamism as a ball-carrier has been preferred to tour captain Sam Warburton, who is short of minutes, and there is no surprise that Taulupe Faletau completes the triumvirate.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREIn the engine room, Gatland has stuck with the experience of Alun Wyn Jones, leaving Maro Itoje on the bench, but fully expecting him to bring his own brand of chaos from the bench at some point in the second-half. George Kruis partners Jones. TAGS: Highlight Leader of men: Peter O’Mahony will lead the Lions out against the All Blacks Power packed: The Lions tight five has performed admirably so farUp front the tireless Mako Vunipola and Jamie George make it three Saracens in the tight-five, with George yet to start a test for England. Anchoring the scrum will be Ireland’s tighthead Tadhg Furlong.The bench is full of class and potency, with Kyle Sinckler expected ask questions of the All Blacks alongside Itoje, whle Rhys Webb and Sexton, offer a creative outlet should the Lions wish to mix things up. Leigh Halfpenny offers back three support and the insurance policy of being the world’s best kicker to bring off the bench. Someone you would trust if he had to clinch a game in the dying minutes.All Blacks v British & Irish Lions, Tuesday 20 June, 7.35pm (8.35am UK & Ireland), FMG Stadium Waikato, live on Sky Sports and TalkSportNew Zealand: Ben Smith, Israel Dagg, Ryan Crotty, Sonny Bill Williams, Reiko Ioane, Beauden Barrett, Aaron Smith; Joe Moody, Codie Taylor, Owen Franks, Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock, Jerome Kaino, Sam Cane, Kieran Read (capt)Flying-machine: Reiko Ioane has been preferred to Julian SaveaReplacements: Nathan Harris, Wyatt Crockett, Charlie Faumuina, Scott Barrett, Ardie Savea, TJ Perenara, Aaron Cruden/Lima Sopoaga, Anton Lienert-Brown Warren Gatland springs a few major surprises as he names the Lions squad to face the All Blacks with some attacking selections Lions: Liam Williams (Wales); Anthony Watson (England), Jonathan Davies (Wales), Ben Te’o (England), Elliot Daly (England); Owen Farrell (England), Conor Murray (Ireland), Mako Vunipola (England), Jamie George (England), Tadhg Furlong (Ireland); Alun Wyn Jones (Wales), George Kruis (England); Peter O’Mahony (capt, Ireland), Sean O’Brien (Ireland), Taulupe Faletau (Wales)Replacements: Ken Owens (Wales), Jack McGrath (Ireland), Kyle Sinckler (England), Maro Itoje (England), Sam Warburton (Wales), Rhys Webb (Wales), Jonathan Sexton (Ireland), Leigh Halfpenny (Wales)last_img read more

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Wales squad for 2018 summer tour

first_imgWith the 2019 World Cup on the horizon, Wales coach Warren Gatland has omitted most of his star names for the summer Tests against South Africa and Argentina Hewitt, Aaron Wainwright and Rhodri Jones were called into the squad as replacements for Adams, Francis and Charteris.Josh Navidi has also been ruled out of the squad after dislocating his shoulder in Cardiff Blues’ European Challenge Cup win over Gloucester.Cardiff Blues scrum-half Tomos Williams had been the only uncapped player in the 31-man Wales squad for their three-Test summer tour, but Wainwright’s addition doubles that tally.Dragons lock Cory Hill and Blues flanker Ellis Jenkins have been named co-captains for the trip, which sees Wales face the Springboks in Washington DC on 2 June, followed by Tests against Argentina on 9 June (San Juan) and 16 June (Santa Fe) on the subsequent Saturdays. “This summer is a great opportunity for this squad to build on their experience, get Test-match game time under their belt and face Rugby Championship opposition,” said Wales head coach Warren Gatland. UPDATED: Wales squad for 2018 summer tour Wait over: Scarlets wing Tom Prydie is picked five years after he last won a Wales cap (CameraSport) “We’ve picked a squad of 31 to try to give players as much game time as possible. It shows the depth we have built in recent years that we have just one uncapped player in the squad in Tomos, but he has been in a number of squads so knows the environment well.“We’ve picked Cory and Ellis as co-captains; they are both leaders and have experience captaining at regional level, so this is an opportunity for them to build on that. This summer is another step on our 2019 RWC path and a great opportunity to build on recent campaigns.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Moriarty and North, who have both missed significant game time because of injuries, are the only players named who went on last summer’s Lions tour to New Zealand. The absence of experienced regulars such as Alun Wyn Jones, Dan Biggar, Ken Owens and Taulupe Faletau means Wales will be hard pressed to build on a largely successful Six Nations championship in which they finished runners-up to Ireland.But Gatland is rightly resting key personnel ahead of next year’s World Cup and the tour will provide crucial further evidence on such issues as who should wear Wales’ No 10 shirt in bigger battles ahead and whether Scarlets flanker James Davies can force his way into the reckoning after a promising Test debut. Wales have called up Worcester wing Josh Adams and Exeter prop Tomas Francis for the Argentina leg of the tour.The pair were originally selected in the squad but were withdrawn when Premiership Rugby refused to release them – and Bath lock Luke Charteris – for the South Africa match because it fell outside the international window.Adams comes in for Steff Evans, who suffered a knee injury in the 22-20 win over the Springboks, and Francis has been called up as cover for Samson Lee, who is receiving treatment for a lower back injury.Related: Five things we learnt from Wales v South AfricaThese aren’t the first injuries to affect the Wales squad. Cardiff Blues back-row Josh Turnbull was called up last week after Aaron Shingler was injured in the Scarlets’ Guinness Pro14 final defeat by Leinster.Ashton Hewitt, who was brought into the squad earlier in the month, has also been ruled out of the tour after suffering a shoulder injury in training. Golden ticket: Blues flanker Ellis Jenkins goes as co-captain despite having started only one Test (Getty) Leading role: Cory Hill will share captaincy duties on the three-Test tour of the Americas (CameraSport) Taking a rest: Alun Wyn Jones gets a break one year on from his part in a drawn Lions series (Getty) Gatland’s side have won their last two outings against South Africa, both in Cardiff, but a neutral venue in the US capital awaits for the opening tour clash.Wales have won five out of the last six meetings against Argentina, all of which were at the Principality Stadium.  On home soil, the Rugby Championship side have won three of the last four Tests against Wales (in 2004 and 2006) and the visitors’ last tour series win against the Pumas came in 1999 with the side captained by Rob Howley and featuring Neil Jenkins as his half-back partner.Tickets for all three Tests are available online.  For more information visit www.wru.co.uk/eng/news/40766.phpWales squad for 2018 summer tourForwardsRob EvansWyn JonesNicky SmithElliot DeeRyan EliasTomas FrancisRhodri JonesSamson LeeDillon LewisAdam BeardBradley DaviesSeb DaviesCory Hill (co-captain)James DaviesEllis Jenkins (co-captain)Ross MoriartyJosh TurnbullAaron WainwrightBacksJosh AdamsAled DaviesGareth DaviesTomos WilliamsGareth AnscombeRhys PatchellHadleigh ParkesOwen WatkinScott WilliamsHallam AmosSteff EvansGeorge NorthTom Prydielast_img read more

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Summer Tours: South Africa v Wales Preview

first_imgAll you need to know about the Test between South Africa and Wales in Washington South Africa v Wales PreviewSouth Africa and Wales are kicking off the 2018 summer tours with a fixture in Washington DC – and Warren Gatland’s side are aiming for a hat-trick of victories against the Springboks.Wales beat South Africa 24-22 in Cardiff last November and 27-13 the year before – and should they win in America it will be their first victory over the Boks outside of the Welsh capital.Both coaches have picked new-look sides for this fixture in America, which falls outside the official international window, as they look to build depth ahead of the 2019 World Cup.Here’s what you need to know about the match…What’s the big team news?Cardiff Blues scrum-half Tomos Williams will make his Test debut for Wales, who will be captained for the first time by Ellis Jenkins.Related: A Q&A with Tomos WilliamsDebutant: Tomos Williams puts in a box-kick for Cardiff Blues (Getty Images)George North is picked at outside-centre – his fourth start in midfield for Wales – while Aaron Wainwright could also earn his first cap if he comes on as a replacement.Rhys Patchell will undergo a fitness test before the game and if he doesn’t come through that successfully, Gareth Davies will take his place on the bench.There are seven uncapped players in the South Africa starting team – and a further six on the bench.Among those making their Test debuts from the off are wing Makazole Mapimpi, who scored ten tries in 13 games for the Cheetahs in the Guinness Pro14 before earning a Super Rugby contract with the Sharks, and flanker Kwagga Smith, who so impressed for the Barbarians against New Zealand last year.Danger man: Makazole Mapimpi in action for the Sharks (Getty Images)The other starters earning their first caps are Travis Ismaiel, Andre Esterhuizen, Ivan van Zyl, Jason Jenkins and Ox Nche, while the uncapped Akker van der Merwe, Thomas du Toit, Marvin Orie, Sikhumbuzo Notshe, Embrose Papier and Robert du Preez are all on the bench.What have the coaches said? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ready for action: The Wales and South Africa teams line up in Cardiff last year (Getty Images) center_img Replacements: Ryan Elias, Wyn Jones, Rhodri Jones, Adam Beard, Aaron Wainwright, Aled Davies, Rhys Patchell/Gareth Davies, Hadleigh Parkes.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. South Africa director of rugby Rassie Erasmus: “As coaches, we are tremendously excited about the prospect of seeing some of our best young players getting the opportunity to play at this level.“Wales have a very solid and effective kicking strategy and their cohesive forward and set-piece play are some of their main strong points.”Wales head coach Warren Gatland: “Everything we are doing is geared for the World Cup in 15 months’ time and the next three matches are a hugely important part of our development.“This weekend is an opportunity for players to build on their Test experience and lay a marker down for the jersey and for the position going forward.”Downtime: Wales take a tour of the United States Naval Academy (Huw Evans Agency)Any interesting statistics?Tom Prydie is winning his first cap for five years. The wing, who made his debut as an 18-year-old in 2010, last played for Wales against Tokyo in June 2013.The Springboks starting line-up has just 134 caps-worth of experience.South Africa wing Travis Ismaiel will not only be celebrating his Test debut against Wales but his 26th birthday.Wales have won only four of their 33 Tests against South Africa. They have drawn once and lost 28 times.If Robert du Preez comes on as a replacement, it will be the first time that three sons of a former Springbok (Robert senior) have also been capped by South Africa. Jean-Luc, Dan and Robert junior would also become the fourth set of three Springbok brothers.George North, with 73 Wales caps, has made 20 more Test appearances than the entire Springboks back-line.When does it kick off and is it on TV?The match is being played at the Robert F Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington DC, which has a capacity of 45,596. It kicks off at 10pm UK time and you can watch the game live on Channel 4.Englishman Matthew Carley will referee the match, with Alexandre Ruiz (France) and Frank Murphy (Ireland) as his assistants.Kick on: Robert du Preez is set to make his debut off the bench (Getty Images)What are the line-ups?SOUTH AFRICA: Curwin Bosch; Travis Ismaiel, Jesse Kriel, Andre Esterhuizen, Makazole Mapimpi; Elton Jantjies, Ivan van Zyl; Ox Nche, Chiliboy Ralepelle, Wilco Louw, Jason Jenkins, Pieter-Steph du Toit (captain), Kwagga Smith, Oupa Mohoje, Dan du Preez.Replacements:Akker van der Merwe, Steven Kitshoff, Thomas du Toit, Marvin Orie, Sikhumbuzo Notshe, Embrose Papier, Robert du Preez, Warrick Gelant.WALES: Hallam Amos; Tom Prydie, George North, Owen Watkin, Steff Evans; Gareth Anscombe, Tomos Williams; Nicky Smith, Elliot Dee, Dillon Lewis, Bradley Davies, Cory Hill, Seb Davies, Ellis Jenkins (captain), Ross Moriarty.last_img read more

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What Is The Haka?

first_img Winners of the past two World Cups, the… A significant performance before every time the All Blacks play, we explain what the haka actually is in this piece. Held in Japan for the first time, make… Pure Entertainment: New Zealand do their haka before a match (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Collapse Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… 2019 Rugby World Cup TV Coverage New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide 2019 Rugby World Cup TV Coverage New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 What Is The Haka?New Zealand are undoubtedly the favourites to secure glory at the 2019 Rugby World Cup because they have the talent, the know-how, the experience and what also gets overlooked; the haka. It is a word we all know and recognise but not many actually know the history of the dance. So let’s take a look.In 2019, the rhetoric is that the haka and the All Blacks are inseparably intertwined.Indeed, there are those of us who are only old enough to know the haka as it is today – all advancing Frenchmen, Piri’s bulging eyes and jumping Jonah.Dig a little deeper (the right YouTube search’ll do) and it’s clear it wasn’t always like this; a 1973 rendition in Cardiff is no more than a jig and a jump, to the point that there’s a spoof version with said footage accompanied by Mud’s jaunty number “Tiger Feet”. So to the next video and, just as rugby and the haka readied the divorce papers in the 80s, a new lease of life arrives with a nose to nose confrontation. The rest is history – first as it’s used home and away, then through the 1995 World Cup and the advent of professionalism, we arrive at today’s version which, to emphasise its standing and to illustrate its transformation, has seen the specially composed and altogether more provocative Kapa O Pango supplement the classic All Black haka, Ka Mate.Kapa O Pango: The intimidating throat-slitting action at the end of the dance (Getty Images)So, what’s the story behind this transformation?While it wasn’t used at home until 1987, the haka has been performed abroad by the All Blacks since the “New Zealand Natives” – all but four were Maori – toured Britain in 1888 and performed “Ake Ake Kia Kaha” (“forever forever stay strong”). Ka Mate was first used in 1905 and various others have appeared over the years, among them “Tena koe, Kangaroo” (wait for it – “How are you, Kangaroo?”) at New Zealand’s first official international in Sydney in 1903 and “Ko Niu Tireni”(“The New Zealand Storm”) which was led by Maori tyro George Nepia of the “Invincibles” of 1924/25.So the haka tottered along for more than half a century, quaint and quirky; novelty, perhaps a little naff; more circus act than war dance, always more playground than battleground. The players – and, more importantly, the punters – happy enough with a stamp here and a shriek there. Perhaps, though, there’s a reason why it looked so different: the players had no attachment to the dance. That the 1905 lot who first Ka Mate’d to a chorus of “Land of My Fathers” in Cardiff were all white is one thing, but later, native-less tours of South Africa another entirely, as the NZRU left Maoris behind in order to please the Apartheid regime. The tradition continued but those who spawned it were absent. Evidently, New Zealand rugby hasn’t always been so attached to its Maori culture. Dollar ruling decency, it seems.“When I first came into the side in the mid-80s,” Wayne “Buck” Shelford, the man many credit as revivalist-in-chief, tells me, “the haka basically didn’t happen. It was a tame jig at best. Many players didn’t enjoy it – they were either embarrassed or didn’t feel any connection to it. There was plenty of discussion about whether we should bother at all.Revivalist: Shelford was huge in rejuvenating the tradition (Getty Images)“A few of the guys asked me and Hika Reid (also a Maori) what we thought. Our response was that the haka should only be done if everyone would do it without inhibition and with understanding of the culture and history behind it. We’d need to practice and to work hard so that we could be proud of it.”So that’s exactly what they did. Shelford and Reid led “training sessions” – not just in the history, moves and mana (pronunciation) of the dance itself but about wider Maoridom – the Marae (meeting house), and its laws and customs. Shelford and Reid had their fun, but sure enough the penny dropped and, as the Pakeha (non-Maori) members of the squad bought in, the ritual became routine, both home and away:“Those sessions were bloody hilarious. Big, proud, butch men being asked to shed their inhibition and do a dance – some of them just had no rhythm whatsoever and had to learn how to just hang loose. By the ’87 World Cup it was a different prospect altogether.”Now, after decades in the doldrums, a carefully-constructed revival and with history less auspicious than most Kiwis would let slip, the haka is ubiquitous. It’s undeniably the most recognisable symbol of Maoridom and arguably – even more than the team that made it famous – the most recognisable symbol of New Zealand.“I’m proud,” says Shelford, “of the way it’s grown and my role in that. It shows off Maori culture. Maoridom has filtered more prominently into other aspects of Kiwi life since the haka’s revival – every school has one, there are tourist attractions, Maori art is more popular and companies’ logos are embossed with Maori designs in a way that they weren’t years ago. “But it’s not just about Maoris anymore. I take pride in the way that Pakeha players embrace it these days. They’re just as passionate.”One of the most recognisable haka-ers in modern times is Piri Weepu and thus his views on it serve as a fine barometer of the hakas current role. He tells me: “My favourite thing about the haka is going a bit wild, trying to look scary and to really lay down that challenge before kick-off. It’s a message. It’s saying to those guys opposite, ‘I’m coming for you out there.’”This is no longer a laughing matter. The ailing animal has been regenerated, a custom secured, and unlike its rugby stars of yore, the haka – and all the perks that come with it – is a tradition all of New Zealand seems to enjoy. Expand Expand The rest of the world remains unsure, though. You know the stories: Shelford and Anderson. Campese. Cockerill and Hewitt. O’Driscoll. Wales stand their ground. France march slowly.And the questions those challengers ask: why is one team allowed an extra round of pre-match thunder? How can a new, specially composed haka be a tradition? The history is patchy, so is all this a construct? And, thus, is cultural pride and“tradition” masking a lust for psychological advantage and boorish, intimidatory aggression? Is there any psychological advantage anyway? Does the IRB have the right to regulate how opponents respond? Does any of this really matter?Weepu’s words confirm two things. Firstly, the haka remains entertainment. For the most part, he whoops, giggles and smiles when recalling “such a great honour.” Yet, without question, the aggressive streak and attempts at intimidation – so oft denied by the likes of Justin Marshall (“the haka is all about us, not them”) – are there. The faces of Ali Williams or Ma’a Nonu as they perform the haka or Tana Umaga and Keven Mealamu’s response to O’Driscoll’s misguided grass-toss support Weepu’s comments and betray the aggression that Marshall seeks to hide.The throat-slit, like that grass toss (O’Driscoll was, of course, operating under guidance from Maori elders), and much other discussion of the haka, is open to cultural interpretation. In European culture, there’s little question as to what the slitting of the throat suggests. The All Blacks insist that for Maoris, the gesture represents the drawing of “hauora” – the breath of life into the heart and lungs.In The Sheds: Doing the haka in the dressing room (Getty Images)This example perfectly illustrates the differences in culture that make the haka’s modern form so divisive. Why must opponents don poker faces from afar as they face something that is patently aggressive, insulting and unpleasant in their culture? Why shouldn’t they stride forward and meet the challenge with a response without the fear of a fine such as the one the French received after losing the 2011 World Cup final? Why must they allow the All Blacks the final chance to gee up their home crowd, as the Welsh so reasonably objected to in 2006? Their refusal to leave the changing room at the Millennium Stadium in 2006 was not the only time the All Blacks have been precious and pretentious when the haka has come into question, but both Weepu and Shelford are measured and reasonable on the subject of responses, and indeed invite reaction. These days, of course, the greatest enemy of the haka answerer is the IRB and that unpublished code of conduct that stung France. The regulations leave the All Blacks’ opponents in a position tantamount to 90 seconds of torture by taunting.Weepu admits that he was “an inch from stepping over the line and getting up real close and personal that day” (and thus copping a fine of his own), but accepts that “they’re not laying the challenge down like we are in terms of actions, words and dancing. What they’ve got to do is stand there and turn the tables on us. We’re challenging them so they should have a right to try to counter it.”Meanwhile, Shelford views that encounter with Willie Anderson – an incident that many believe launched the arms race of haka aggression that we’ve seen in the 25 years since – as “a real highlight. We spoke about it afterwards and had both enjoyed it, the fronting up and the head on challenge. Willie’s response was the way to do it. After all, New Zealand has never won a game because of the haka. We’ve won because we’ve played better rugby across 80 minutes.”The haka has history and is a tradition, yes. But in 30 years, the haka has been built carefully from a hack-Gangnam bop so slow and so unfashionable that it lay within an inch of its life to an undeniably intimidatory act of ceremony so entwined with New Zealand rugby that it’s hard to imagine one without the other and so visually spectacular that broadcasters covet it and the IRB works to protect its sanctity. A look at message-boards, lounge-rooms and stadia the world over confirms that the haka remains a drawcard. No one wants to lose the haka. It’s sport’s greatest off-field theatre. But importantly we must remember that whilst this tradition is a treasure, it is also a challenge, too. Challenges await response. Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023last_img read more

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Johnny Sexton fumble leads to George Ford try

first_imgThe March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine – a Six Nations special – is on sale now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Ultimately the game fizzled out after a strong opening, but England will now be targetting a Triple Crown – they play Wales in round four – and Ireland will be hoping they can upset France’s Grand Slam bid in the final round. England looked in total control at the break, a Farrell penalty in the closing minutes of the half giving them a 17-0 lead.Yet it was Ireland who started the second half stronger, coming out in much the physical manner that England had started the first.The visitors had a concerted spell of pressure in England’s 22, a series of penalties helping their cause. From one penalty in front of the posts Ireland opted for a five-metre scrum and following a series of strong carries towards England’s line, Robbie Henshaw burrowed over from close range.England reasserted their authority on the hour mark. First they won a penalty with a huge scrum seven metres from their own line. They opted for the five-metre lineout and quickly had another penalty when Ireland collapsed their maul.They went for another lineout and this time got the drive going, several backs joining in too. When it splintered, England got across the line and Luke Cowan-Dickie was at the bottom of the pile of bodies grounding the ball.Ireland had the final say on the scoreboard when Andrew Porter drove over from close range for their second try and John Cooney converted after a series of pick-and-goes near the line following a lineout in the 22. Johnny Sexton fumble leads to George Ford tryEngland will have their sights set on a Triple Crown after following up their Six Nations victory over Scotland a fortnight ago with a 24-12 triumph over Ireland at Twickenham that extinguished Irish Grand Slam hopes.The hosts were hugely dominant in the first half, their physicality putting pressure on Ireland and ensuring they maintained possession – and they were helped by a few Irish errors too.Yet the game was punctuated by tetchy moments, and a raft of stoppages and replacements in the second half disrupted the flow of the match.France may be the only unbeaten team after three rounds but Ireland could disrupt their Grand Slam bid as they travel to Paris in the final round of the championship, while wins over Wales and Italy in England’s next two games could put them in title contention, too, depending on how France fare in their matches.Jump to it: A lineout during the England v Ireland match (Getty Images)Back to this game and it was an error from the Ireland captain that set up the opening try. Johnny Sexton fumbled the ball behind his own line less than ten minutes into the match against England to gift George Ford a try.England had started the game strongly – their first at Twickenham in this Six Nations campaign – and dominated possession as well as territory early on.From one attack just outside the Irish 22, England scrum-half Ben Youngs chipped over the Ireland defence and Owen Farrell chased hard.Sexton and Jordan Larmour were back to cover the kick and as it bounced over the line, Sexton tapped the ball in the air to try to catch it but then couldn’t control it.As the ball went loose, George Ford, who had been following Farrell in chasing the kick, pounced to touch down and score the opening try of the match. Farrell added the conversion to give England a 7-0 lead after nine minutes.You can watch the try – and the moments that led up to it here…Ireland were awarded a penalty from the restart but couldn’t capitalise from the five-metre lineout they opted for. Sexton had a chance to narrow the gap from a subsequent penalty but missed.Another kick ahead produced England’s second try midway through the first half. This time Ford kicked behind the Irish defence and Elliot Daly beat Jacob Stockdale to touch the ball down just before it rolled dead. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS George Ford scores England’s first try after a mistake from Johnny Sexton (Getty Images) Irish errors play part in England’s 24-12 win over Ireland at Twickenhamlast_img read more

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Anglican university in the Congo attacked

first_img Africa, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Featured Events Anglican Communion Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Jan 8, 2013 Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Colleges and Universities of the Anglican Communion] One of the member schools in Colleges and Universities of the Anglican Communion (CUAC) in Africa has been affected by the fighting in Congo. Despite being 250 miles north from the fighting in Goma, the Université Anglicane du Congo experienced its first attack since its opening two years ago. The Revd Canon Daniel Sabiti Tibafa, the university vice chancellor, has sent the following report:“Yes, the morning night of 22 December 2013 at around 2:00 am, armed people broke the door of our house threatening to kill all of us if we did not have any money on us. They forced the door with heavy stones…and the guns to destroy the lock of the door. In the house we managed to get $200 and they forced me to take them into my office where we got another $250. They beat me on the back and on my right hand. The right hand pain is still being dealt with by our lovely nurse Miss Kiiza Kahwa.“Everybody at the university was mobilized to help us in the house, but could not come near us because of the bullets they fired mercilessly on both of us and them. We were nine people, i.e., my wife Damalie, our boys Emmanuel and Kefa, and the girls, Nyangoma, Winnie, Esther, Mave and Adah. All of us would have lost our lives was it not the mercy of God on us! Praise be to Him! They entered our bedroom throwing bitter words on us to give money or else to die. Traces of 7 bullets were found in our house and other 4 fired outside to keep away the members of the community, students and members of staff. One hour after, the police being called by Revd Martin, the Academic secretary, came to realize what was there.“In spite of this incident, the university is still doing its work. As you know already, we organized five faculties in our university: Theology, Administration and Economic Sciences, Psychology and Education Sciences, Polytechnic (Civil Engineering) and Sciences (Mines and Geology). This academic year we will have about 70 students, of whom 11 from the theological faculty are graduating after their third year at university in the undergraduate level.“We also are happy to say that we have now produced two more doctors in theology, having finished in May and July 2012 in the Protestant University of Congo, Kinshasa. These are Revd Dr Yossa Way in Missiology and Revd Dr Kahwa Njojo in New Testament Theology. Ven. Sadiki Kangamina Christopher is also doing his PhD in Old Testament Theology at the Shalom University of Bunia. Revd Kamana Niyonzima is also doing his graduate studies at the same university in Missiology as well. We thank God for that.”CUAC’s General Secretary, the Revd Canon James Callaway, was present two years ago at the laying of the university’s foundation stone by Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams. Upon hearing of the attack, Canon Callaway noted: “The Anglican University has been a force for knitting community back together after the years of conflict in Congo, bringing together former victims and men who were drawn into the militias. As such it has been a vital force for peace, which now more than ever needs our support to continue.”Professor Sabiti reported that the attack spared the recently-installed Internet classroom, equipped last November under a grant from Trinity Church Wall Street, USA. Especially with a meagre library, this facility makes it possible for the university to keep up-to-date in information and in research, especially through the newly-initiated research Department, Centre de Recherche Interfacultaire de l’UAC, and the new Research Review called LUMEN: Revue Interfacultaire. Construction of a block of four lecture rooms under the sponsorship of the UK Congo Church Association continues, with roofing completed and installation of flooring underway.The war has not reached Bunia at present. Professor Sabiti said, “The only problem is the presence of the hors la loi entering people’s houses at night, killing and robbing goods and money. They are really creating insecurity in this town. There also the militiamen between Bunia and Boga in the Lendu Region who keep on looting people on the way in a sporadic way. We are really very sad about what is happening in and in the surrounding of Goma City in the North-Kivu Province. Please pray for our country and especially in this eastern part of the country. We need peace and freedom to work and to enjoy the wealth that our dear Father gave us here in our country, unfortunately smuggled by the outside.”On 14-15 December 2012 the second Administrative Council of the University met in Bunia, chaired by His Grace the Most Revd Henri Isingoma, Archbishop of the Province de L’Église Anglicane Du Congo and President of the university. Professor Sabiti concluded, “Without any doubt, the university is still functioning. Activities resume on 7th of January 2013, God willing. Please pray for us as usual, because the Evil One never stops to haunt us with his bitter arrows of affliction.” Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican university in the Congo attacked Break-in resulted in damage, no fatalities Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

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San Joaquin takes ‘interim steps’ toward election of provisional bishop

first_img Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Megan Baptista says: September 28, 2013 at 12:20 am Bishop Rice’s energy and vision will undoubtedly galvanize the diocese of San Joaquin. Good choice! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group San Joaquin takes ‘interim steps’ toward election of provisional bishop New Zealand’s David Rice poised to lead diocese AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Robert L. Kennedy says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service September 27, 2013 at 5:22 pm Pat McCaughan did a wonderful job of clarifying and explaining a very complex situation.Thanks. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC September 11, 2014 at 3:14 pm I hope you folk find as much joy in working with this superb and religious man as I didwhen I worked with him in North Carolina. He is excellent and believes what he preaches.Blessings to him and your church as he serves with you.center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Zealand’s David Rice set to become the next provisional bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin. Photo/Anglican Taonga[Episcopal News Service] Bishop David Rice of the Diocese of Waiapu in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is poised to become the next provisional bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin.If elected, he would succeed Bishop Chester L. Talton, who has served nearly three years as provisional bishop and who has announced his intention to retire. Talton, who retired in 2010 as suffragan of Los Angeles, turned 72 on Sept. 22.“The Standing Committee has made a very good choice because they discerned that the diocese has reached a place where we are ready to respond to the rebuilding that has been going on since 2008,” Talton said in a Sept. 26 telephone interview with ENS.“The diocese is in a place where the clergy and the congregations are really ready to look to a different kind of future. We have a new sense now of really being a diocese, a church together, all of the congregations. We’ve been re-energized by the fact that we have begun to receive back some properties and the diocese has celebrated all that together.“They are ready to move beyond that to actively restructuring the diocese for the kind of mission and growth they can really be about,” he said.San Joaquin’s Standing Committee announced Sept. 25 that they had selected Rice from among several candidates they considered in consultation with the Office of the Presiding Bishop.Via Skype, the committee had learned that Rice’s “passion is missiology and that he has a proven track record for invigorating churches. His energy, enthusiasm and zeal seem to be perfect for our diocese now,” according to the committee statement. “The Standing Committee believes that this bishop is the one whom God is calling to our diocese now.”But, the statement also noted that Rice, who attended high school and college in North Carolina, is not presently serving in the Episcopal Church and therefore several interim steps must be taken before he can stand for election for San Joaquin’s provisional bishop.The House of Bishops took one of those steps at its regularly scheduled fall meeting Sept. 19-24 in Nashville, Tennessee, by approving a resolution to appoint Rice as an assistant bishop of San Joaquin “provided that the diocesan convention approves the creation of the position of assistant bishop at its upcoming annual meeting and each of the canonical requirements are satisfied, including but not limited to the Canon III.12.5(b)(3).”When delegates to the 54th annual San Joaquin diocesan convention gather Oct. 25-26 in Modesto, California, they will be asked to approve the creation of the position of assisting bishop.“This interim step would have Bishop Rice serve as assistant bishop in the diocese pursuant to the canons of the Episcopal Church, which expressly permit a bishop from another part of the communion to serve as an assistant bishop in the Episcopal Church (Canons III.12.5 (a) and (b)(3),” according to the resolution approved by the House of Bishops.Church canons require that provisional bishops must be either resigned from or serving in a diocese of the Episcopal Church.In addition to the consent of the House of Bishops, Rice would also need to satisfy other conditions, such as completion of psychological and medical tests, resigning as bishop of Waiapu, receiving approval from the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia, and submitting to the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Episcopal Church in writing, according to the bishops’ resolution.The Standing Committee proposed a February arrival for Rice, pending convention approval and completion of necessary canonical requirements for bishops. At that time, Talton would appoint him assistant bishop and Rice would begin serving in that capacity.A proposed March 29, 2014 date has been set for a special convention to elect and seat Rice as provisional bishop.According to an Anglican Taonga story, Rice is returning to the United States where he was born and raised in response to the needs of his extended American family.Archbishop Philip Richardson, who is the senior bishop of the seven New Zealand dioceses, said the three primates here have accepted Rice’s resignation with regret, according to the story. “For the last five and half years, Bishop David has thrown himself, body and soul, into serving the Diocese of Waiapu,” Richardson said.“His people here will miss him. Equally, they will understand, as we do, the responsibilities we all have to care for our extended whānau [a Māori word for extended family]. He and [his wife] Tracy will return to the U.S. with our blessing and prayers.”Rice told Anglican Taonga that leaving would be wrenching because “New Zealand is a country that we have loved well for 18 years, and know intimately. I have been a vicar, dean and bishop here, and this is the place where our children have spent their entire lives.“But the need is urgent. We feel it is right for us to take this step – and a response to God’s prompting.”Rice earned a Master of Divinity degree at Duke University and was ordained deacon and elder in the Methodist Church in 1989 and 1991 respectively. He served as a minister in the Methodist Church in both North Carolina and New Zealand.In 1997, he was made deacon and ordained priest in the Diocese of Christchurch of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia. He served as a vicar in a parish in New Zealand before becoming the dean of Dunedin, St. Paul’s Cathedral in 2002. In 2008 he was consecrated the 15th bishop of the Diocese of Waiapu.He is married to Tracy; the couple has two children, Ian and Zoe, who will continue their university educations in New Zealand.Planning has now begun for an election for his successor.If elected, Rice will become the San Joaquin diocese’s third provisional bishop. Bishop Jerry Lamb, retired diocesan of Northern California, began serving in that capacity in March 2008 after theological differences split the diocese in 2007. Talton succeeded Lamb in 2011.Earlier this year, five congregations that were held by a breakaway group were returned to the Episcopal Church; other disputed properties throughout the diocese are in various stages of litigation. Another church property — St. Paul’s, Modesto — was returned July 1, 2009 prior to any litigation.Litigation is still pending for approximately five cases involving 33 more properties including the Camp and Conference Center, and the cathedral located in Fresno, along with the related diocesan investment accounts.The Standing Committee’s statement said Rice was their choice because “we sensed that we need to think well beyond litigation, to continue to implement plans to make this diocese thrive and to move forward to set an example to the church of what resurrection looks like in the San Joaquin and beyond, in ways that we have only begun.” –The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska By Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 27, 2013 Rector Bath, NC Nina Salmon says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. Nancy Sjoholm says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Elections October 13, 2013 at 10:52 pm Part of the problem is that the diocese needs a provisional bishop, which means a bishop already serving another diocese or someone who is resigned (retired). Here in the San Joaquin, we’ve had two provisional bishops in a row that were called from resignation, meaning they were already of retirement age. Bishops called from resignation are unlikely to serve for very long, and the diocese is in need of someone who can serve here long term. We’re trying to find our way out of brokenness–but we can’t do that if we keep having to find a new bishop every two or three years. So I wouldn’t say that this is a statement about anything–it’s a canonically sound strategy given the situation. I am personally pretty excited about the possibilities here. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Comments (4) Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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Fresh setback for Asia Bibi as Supreme Court appeal delayed

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Asia Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Asia Bibi, the Christian woman on death row in Pakistan after being convicted of blasphemy in a row over drinking water, will have to wait for her Supreme Court appeal after a hearing due to take place Oct. 13 was adjourned. Justice Iqbal Hameed-ur-Rehman, one of the panel of three judges due to hear the appeal, recused himself saying that there was a conflict of interest.Full article. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Fresh setback for Asia Bibi as Supreme Court appeal delayed In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Gavin DrakePosted Oct 13, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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