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‘Sing the positive song’ – IDA chief

first_imgWhatsApp Advertisement Linkedin NewsLocal News‘Sing the positive song’ – IDA chiefBy admin – April 28, 2011 666 Twitter Limerick told image is important in procuring jobsIMAGE is an issue in procuring foreign investment, and Limerick people should sing the positive song.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up That was the advice from the IDA’s Regional Manager, Sean Denver, invited to City Hall to explain where Limerick stood in the pecking order of new investment.‘We sell the catchment area on its track record, tax incentives available, its technology and its talent – we market on these assets but image is an issue, and I’d say the problem is to get Limerick people to sing the positive song”.It has emerged that a minimum of 50% of foreign investment jobs are earmarked for locations outside of Dublin.It was emphasised that the IDA’s strategy focuses  “very much on a regional basis”.Mary Buckley, Regional Development Officer, IDA, said:“We use Limerick as the entrance to the Mid West  which has 8,000 people employed in 51 IDA jobs.“The companies decide where they are going – the challenge for us is to get them into locations that they have not been considering”.Limerick, she agreed, has a proven track record in securing foreign investment, citing  the University of Limerick, Limerick Institute of Technology, the Art College, Mary I and other educational institutions, air  access, business parks and proximity to Dublin and Cork, as well as other attractions.With a huge amount of under-used office space available, Cllr Diarmuid Scully said: “We would like to hear plans as we are now at crisis point”.The IDA, according to Cllr Jim Long “has fingerprints all over the slide down for Limerick, and  Cllr Maurice Quinlivan claimed there is a sense that the IDA has failed to bring any low skill jobs.In an interview with the Limerick Post, Cllr Joe Leddin, asked:“Some 10,000 foreign investment jobs were created last year by the IDA, but less than 1% of them came to Limerick, and going forward, a minimum of 50% of foreign investment must locate outside of Dublin – where is Limerick in the pecking order.“The message has now gone back to IDA  that they haven’t been delivering for Limerick and the greater Mid West Region, even though it was recommended in Brosnan’s Mid West Task Force that they beef up their Limerick office.  It’s 15 years since the last significant multinational,  Vistakon, set up in the Technological Park”.He added:I seriously question their role in terms of what they are doing for Limerick – for instance, why have they not had the 70 acre site they own for over 10 years on the Technological Park serviced with top standard infrastructure and vigorously marketed?“But now with more political clout in the city – Michael Noonan in the most senior ministerial position, as well as Jan O’Sullivan in Foreign Affairs, where the emphasis is now on promoting Ireland more, we may see a stronger return. Hopefully, the customer services company, Gilt, will, as promised by the IDA, deliver 100 new jobs in a few months”.center_img Email Facebook Print Previous articleLimerick FC face Athlone on Friday nightNext articleO’Connell could face Harlequins adminlast_img read more

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Waco Hoover – XLIVE Esports Summit – Creating event value

first_imgWaco Hoover is the CEO and Co-Founder of XLIVE, a company which believes in doing live events differently. Waco Hoover, XLIVEThis summer, come August (22-24), XLIVE is organising an Esports Summit in New York City. We’ve seen a number of esports business events emerge in the past year but there’ve been few in the big apple. We spoke to Waco about the summit which has ESL CEO Craig Levine, ELEAGUE’s VP and GM Christina Alejandre, Facebook Head of Esports Patrick Chapman and more confirmed to speak. Esports Insider: So we’ve seen a number of esports conferences emerge in the past year, why is the XLIVE Esports Summit any different?Waco: XLIVE is focused on creating extraordinary live event experiences and one of the key tenants of esports is the live event component. We work across not only esports but are able to draw upon knowledge and resources from traditional sports, music festivals, food, beer & wine festivals, brands that host their own events along with a huge emphasis on event tech that connects all these live event markets. Because we have deep relationships in these tangential markets we can incorporate learning and best practices that are relevant to the esports community. The ability to learn from outside your own industry, from relevant stakeholders offers more opportunity for innovation.“Attendees come to a business conference for a number of things; address pain points, learn best practices, hear something new, learn about new tools/tech available, network with their peers, understand future trends and be inspired at some level”Another key component will be the programs focus on the role and impact of sports, brands and event technology. These three areas will all play important roles for the esports community to fully monetise and grow their assets in the future. We’re excited about the dialogue that will take place in August.    ESI: You’ve a number of speakers from both inside and outside esports – is this mix important?Waco: We think the appropriate amount of perspective from outside the industry is very important.“Traditional sports and music festivals are two segments that esports can learn many valuable lessons from”While esports is growing rapidly, it also still has a lot to learn as a community which represents tremendous opportunity. A potential source of innovation is bringing in ideas from analogous events. Pooling insights from analogous areas is powerful because teams versed in analogous fields are not mentally constrained by existing, “known” solutions to the problem in the target area and can draw on different pools of knowledge. That will be a key distinction of the August program in NYC so that attendees can hear first hand from comparable markets.ESI: The XLIVE team are events people through and through. Taking into account your knowledge in the area how do you think esports tournaments and events as a whole can better monetise? Moreover, how can they appeal to a wider audience?Waco: Successfully selling sponsorships and activating them is one critical part of monetisation but measuring the return is an area all events can continue to improve upon. Demonstrating return and value with quantitative data is where we’re headed and it’s what sponsors will expect in the future. Event tech platforms that enable the organiser to do so are something all organisations should be looking at. There are also significant opportunities to generate additional revenue from enhanced onsite experiences with food, beverage, talent/athlete engagement and other immersive experiences. The streaming and broadcast mediums are another area for monetisation that represent a tremendous amount of opportunity given the millions of viewers for esports events.“When you think about player recruitment, development, culture and brand building these are all things that professional sports has been doing for decades and these are areas esports can borrow from significantly”As you broaden the appeal and value through additional experiences at the event, it stops becoming about just seeing gaming competition but also the other activities taking place so you end up moving the needle on who might want to attend your event. Social influencers will be more likely to have another friend or family member come along as a result.ESI: Which industries do you think esports stands to learn best from? And which lessons should it take on board?Waco: Traditional sports and music festivals are two segments that esports can learn many valuable lessons from. Music festivals started with the core focus on the bands in the lineup but have now evolved to include so many other experiences that both broadened the audience and increased monetisation opportunities. The more value a ticket represents means that you can charge a premium for that ticket. If you add ancillary revenue streams, the event can increase top line growth. VIP packages have become a staple representing another opportunity to transform the experience and increase revenue as well. It’s important to recognise that when borrowing ideas you have to apply them to the culture of your community to realise the desired effect.“We think the appropriate amount of perspective from outside the industry is very important”Sports has parallels to the aforementioned lessons but represents other opportunities as well. There has been a huge amount of investment and interest in esports from the professional sports community. When you think about player recruitment, development, culture and brand building these are all things that professional sports has been doing for decades and these are areas esports can borrow from significantly. We will have panelists from the NBA, European Football leagues, NFL and others addressing this topic in August.ESI: What makes for a memorable business conference?Waco: Generally speaking attendees come to a business conference for a number of things; address pain points, learn best practices, hear something new, learn about new tools/tech available, network with their peers, understand future trends and be inspired at some level. If attendees walk away having checked the box in a few of these categories there is significant value in that. In particular, when you can take that back and share it with your organisation.“We have panelists from the NBA, European Football leagues, NFL and others addressing this topic in August”Our goal for the XLIVE Esports Summit is to convene industry stakeholders to address the most pressing issues facing the industry but also enable attendees to identify new opportunities for growth and organisations that they can partner with to do so. Disclaimer: Esports Insider is an official media partner of the XLIVE Esports Summitlast_img read more

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