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Mental health education will serve lawyers well

first_imgMental health education will serve lawyers well Mental health education will serve lawyers well Following action by the Florida Supreme Court, Bar members can now count mental health awareness education as part of their required CLE courses on professionalism, ethics, and substance abuse. The court made that change recently when it approved the annual amendments for the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. The proposal for change was spearheaded by two Bar members — Angela Vickers, a Jacksonville lawyer and mental health advocate, and Ernst Mueller, chair of the Jacksonville Bar Association’s Committee on Law and the Disabled. In 1998, they drafted an amendment to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, with the intention of bringing it directly to the Florida Supreme Court. The duo had collected 50 signatures from Bar members on a petition which allowed them to bypass the Bar’s Board of Governors, pursuant to Rule 1-12.1(f). However, in order to gain the Bar’s approval, they reconsidered and brought the amendment before the board. In May 1999, the Board of Governors unanimously approved the measure, and several board members, in expressing their support, talked about their personal reasons for recommending the Supreme Court’s approval of the amendment. “I want to take this success in Florida and make it a national success,” said Vickers, who is scheduled to speak at two upcoming national mental health conferences. “I’ve planted the seeds nationally for justice through education.” Vickers has taught several programs already across the state, and she is currently in the process of teaching others to lead seminars. Personal Experience After a single episode in 1988, Vickers was diagnosed with manic-depression and lost her husband and her two children through a painful divorce. With counseling and medication, Vickers has remained well and stable and has not had another manic episode. Treatment for mental illness has progressed to the point today where, though a “cure” isn’t yet possible, stabilization can be achieved. The key to treatment, she notes, is awareness. “So much of this tragedy could’ve been prevented if people understood [mental illness],” she said. “If I had had any episodes before, it was in a good sense in that it gave me enough energy to get all those `As’ in college. That’s why attorneys are at risk. For very successful people, your lack of need for sleep or grandiose delusions can be a temporarily helpful thing. For some people, they roll along and never even know they’ve got an illness.” Mental illness onset is not something that “comes out of the blue,” according to Vickers. Symptoms can arise, often unnoticed, years before the illness is discovered. Increasing attorneys’ awareness of the symptoms and methods of mental illness may aid in early detection and treatment, which ultimately may prevent a great deal of attorney discipline, substance abuse, or suicides, she said. This is just one side of the coin, however. Education about mental illness will also help attorneys to deal more effectively with their clients. An underlying cause of many crimes is substance abuse, which is often just a person’s attempt at self-medication of a mental illness, Vickers said. Attorneys who can spot the warning signs of mental illness are better equipped to help their clients both in and out of court. “The thousands of mentally ill citizens of Florida lack a means of locating Bar members who understand mental illness, creating a sense of defenselessness and oppression in their efforts to end the discrimination they face,” Vickers wrote in a letter seeking support from the chair of the BLSE. “Most with a mental diagnosis are wrongfully, shamefully hiding their mental disorders for fear of persecution. Fear of mistreatment is causing thousands to remain in denial, refusing to see the psychiatrist they need, and/or refusing to take the medications prescribed. Common, inherited, and very treatable brain disorders are all they are guilty of having.” Though Vickers is hesitant to have too much of her personal experience with mental illness discussed, for fear of overshadowing her advocacy efforts, she will soon disclose many of her difficulties and triumphs in the press. “There will be a book and a movie — several producers have already talked to me about it — as soon as I slow down from the advocacy,” she said. “The time has come to stop treating people with mental illnesses as though they’re witches or as though they’re somehow unfit, and until we get full national access for people to lawyers who understand this, we’re having civil rights being deprived all over this nation.” June 15, 2001 Regular Newslast_img

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Hall’s career day, Alexander’s consistency sparks Orange in win over DePaul

first_imgElashier Hall was banged up and bruised.Hall could’ve chosen not to play. But that option never crossed her mind.“I always tease Lacie. I say, ‘You’re just old,’” Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman said with a smile. “She’s really banged up, but unless I say she can’t go, she’s going to go.”And go she did. Hall sparked Syracuse (15-1, 3-0 Big East) to an 84-80 win over DePaul (13-5, 2-2) Tuesday night at the Carrier Dome. The senior finished with 23 points, six rebounds and five steals, and complemented center Kayla Alexander to create a lethal one-two punch. Hall helped the Orange get off to hot starts in each half and came up with pivotal buckets down the stretch to ignite SU to a come-from-behind win.Hall didn’t take long to leave her imprint on a game in which every basket mattered and the lead changed 13 times. After Cornelia Fondren hit Syracuse’s first shot, Hall caught on fire. She drilled a 3-pointer off of a pass from Brianna Butler to give SU a 5-3 lead.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwo layups by DePaul’s Jasmine Penny put the Blue Demons in front by two. Hall responded with a runner. Moments later, though, an Anna Martin 3-pointer helped DePaul reclaim the lead.But Hall wasn’t done. She knotted the score at 10 on a laser from downtown. After another layup by Penny, Hall poured in a fourth and final jumper before getting a standing ovation from her teammates as she took a seat on the bench.“They were just falling, and I was feeling it,” Hall said. “And my teammates were giving me the ball.”Hall didn’t miss in the first half, thanks in large part to her ability to exploit the matchup she was given. At 5 feet 11 inches, the long guard Hall was matched up with Martin, who stands at just 5 feet 9 inches, for a good chunk of the game.Hillsman said Hall recognized the mismatch and came out with intensity and an unremitting goal to attack the basket whenever possible.“She was aggressive,” Hillsman said. “I thought she had a matchup where she could go to the basket, and she really got to the basket a lot tonight. She was really excellent.”Watch: The Orange overcomes “bumps and bruises” to defeat the Blue Demons TuesdayIn fact, Hillsman said 16 of Hall’s 18 shots came in the paint. The other two came from her two 3-pointers early in the first half.Hall said DePaul plays with a lot of energy and likes to push the ball up and down the court with urgency. While other teams deliberately slow the game down against the athletic Orange, Hall knew this game would be different.“Our goal is to try to keep them under 80 possessions,” Hall said. “They get 80 or 90 possessions a game because they play so fast.”Led by Penny and Martin, DePaul’s run-and-gun offensive scheme worked flawlessly in the first half. The Blue Demons took a 46-40 lead into the break, using a 13-4 run to earn the edge.But Hall made sure that trend didn’t continue. She scored eight of Syracuse’s first 15 points coming out of the break, eight in a row to propel SU back into the lead.“We came in the locker room at halftime and coach talked about giving more effort and more energy, and we knew we had a run in us,” Hall said. “We were able to get out and run.”Hall also opened the floor for Alexander. Syracuse’s star center finished the night with 24 points, 17 rebounds and four blocks. Hillsman said Hall’s penetration allowed Alexander to get easy looks and convert inside.“(Hall) took her player off the bounce, and that allowed Kayla to get lots of rebounds and putbacks,” Hillsman said. “I thought she did a lot to collapse the defense and to get us second-chance opportunities.”Alexander finished with eight offensive rebounds. Even when Hall missed, she was creating opportunities for Alexander to lay the ball back up and into the basket. DePaul center Katherine Harry stayed with Alexander at first, but as the game wore on she was visibly exhausted, and Alexander took advantage.Alexander said Hall stepped up at key moments in a key game for Syracuse. The duo carried SU to yet another Big East win in a game that went down to the wire.“We have a really strong team this year, from the freshmen to the seniors,” Alexander said. “Anyone can produce on any given night. You can always rely on different teammates to step up and have a big game.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 16, 2013 at 12:59 am Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHasscenter_img Related Stories As seniors lead freshmen, underclassmen return favorSyracuse survives toughest test of season with win over DePaullast_img read more

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Glo urges Black Stars to consider every match as the final

first_imgThe Board and Management of Glo Mobile Ghana, official sponsor of the senior national team, the Black Stars has sent a message of goodwill and encouragement to the players and technical handlers of the team in South Africa, urging them to remain focused and treat each of the remaining games as the final.The message said, having followed the performance of the Black Stars so far, Glo was delighted to observe that the team has now fully warmed itself up into the thick and thin of the tournament, as they demonstrated in the precision with which they dealt with the challenge from Niger and the 2 – 0 victory over Cape Verde.‘As a sponsor and supporter of the national team, we at Glo take note of the team’s strenuous preparations for this tournament and the gradual, but impressive buildup and revival of its winning spirit in the four matches the Stars have played so far; we are left with no doubt at all that the Black Stars will bring home Ghana’s much awaited fifth African nations trophy,’ said the statement signed by John Vasikaran, Head of Business at Glo Mobile Ghana.‘All we ask is that all players and the technical handlers remain focused on the big mission of annexing the Nations Cup for the fifth time; but in order to achieve this, it is important that you (Black Stars) tackle each of the remaining games as if it is the very final match of the tournament,’ the message pleaded.Glo Mobile has sponsored the Ghana Black Stars since 2008 along with Ghana’s Premier League, of which the African telecommunications giant is the headline sponsor.Glo only recently presented a cheque for over US$2,000,000 (two million US dollars) to the Ghana Football Association in fulfillment of the company’s pledge to support the Black Stars and promote the development of football in Ghana.last_img read more

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first_imgRead Next “Even the gods cannot help those who do not seize opportunities.” This Asian proverb resonates in post-typhoon “Yolanda” efforts. They range from rehabilitation “czar” Panfilo Lacon skidding into his old cop role to buttressing coastal forests like mangroves, beyond Leyte Gulf, throughout the country.Storm-battered uplands are the overlooked crisis, UN Food and Agriculture Organization cautions. One out of five Filipinos cluster in often denuded uplands, distant from major highways and isolated by patchy communication links. They’re “invisible” to organizations, now pouring aid into lowlands and media focused on the capitals. Windows of opportunity for uplands were being shuttered after “Yolanda” stormed out.ADVERTISEMENT Greenbelts are mandated by Presidential Decree 705 to the 1998 Fisheries Code. But non-compliance resulted in a graveyard of “dead laws.” Replace inutile greenbelt stipulations, (stashed) in forgettable sections of unenforced regulations, Primavera urged. Enact a National Greenbelt Law. And local government units must don a post-Yolanda mindset.MORE STORIESnewsinfoPalace: Opinion column critical of Sara, President a ‘black propaganda’newsinfoRizal on beating bullies: Use brains, not brawnnewsinfoCrimes of warMORE STORIESnewsinfoPalace: Opinion column critical of Sara, President a ‘black propaganda’newsinfoRizal on beating bullies: Use brains, not brawnnewsinfoCrimes of warThe Philippines has “world-class expertise on mangrove and beach forest management,” FAO’s Patrick Durst points out. How to bring science-based knowledge to bear on specific sites and harness people’s involvement is the challenge.This is critical because few realize the damage the typhoon inflicted on brittle upland communities. One out of five Filipinos live in often denuded uplands. Poverty-strapped, they’re the first victims when calamities like Yolanda hit.Illegal logging encroaches on remaining 7.16 million hectares of forest, yet, they house the richest varied flora and fauna on earth. Their watersheds irrigate more than 1.5 million hectares of lowland farms.Given patchy communication links, reports of upland typhoon damage trickle to central agencies and international organizations. The little that came through is appalling.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Capital One Data Breach ‘Yolanda’ victims prefer bunkhouses to ‘evac’ centers NAFTA: Democrats Leveraging the Trump Administration View comments PCSO to focus on improving transparency of gaming activities PLAY LIST 03:26PCSO to focus on improving transparency of gaming activities01:39Sotto open to discuss, listen to pros and cons of divorce bill06:02Senate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreements01:50Palace open to make Dengvaxia usable again as dengue cases spike01:49House seeks probe on ‘massive corruption’ in PCSO01:37PCSO estimates P250M in Lotto revenue loss due to suspension In Chinese, the word ‘crisis’ is composed of two characters, President John F. Kennedy noted. The first represents “danger” and the second means “opportunity.”Opportunities are masked in “impossible situations.” But these windows slam shut — fast. Carpe diem, the sages urge (Seize the day). Act firmly and set aside partisan squabbles, seen in Secretary Mar Roxas versus Tacloban mayor Alfred Romualdez’s brawl. Attempt to achieve what, in the calcified past, seemed unsolvable.FEATURED STORIESNEWSINFOSenate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreementsNEWSINFOLocsin wants to drop ‘visas upon arrival’ privilegeNEWSINFOPasig to sue 6 enforcers for extortion“Often, we stare at a door that’s closing only to see, too late, the open one.” Those who dawdle over opportunity lose. “Luck happens when preparation meets opportunity,” the philosopher Seneca wrote.Until “Yolanda,” most local governments razed mangroves or paved them with concrete. But villages in Eastern Samar to Negros Oriental were buffered by sturdy mangrove stands,” notes Dr. Jurgene Primavera. Time magazine earlier named her among the world’s top 100 environmental scientists. Show me the money: Price-tagging Enrique Gil’s photos ACLU: 911 Toddlers and Babies Separated from Parents MOST READ Senate to probe Tolentino’s ‘novel legal theories’ on oral agreements Some 11,954 households in 108 people’s organizations in Region VIII, were ripped by the storm. In Regions VI, VII and VIII, over 6,740 hectares of banana plantations were damaged beyond recovery. Mango losses exceed P84 million.Credit DENR secretary Ramon Paje for swiftly proposing rehabilitation of mangroves and beach forests. But this initiative fizzled off in dealing with battered uplands. At inter-agency meetings with international organizations, National Economic Development Authority (DENR) mumbled vague estimates, failing to make a badly-needed case for upland communities. The excuse of lack of staff and funds looks more threadbare as days pass.Yet, there is no shortage of thought-out recovery and resiliency program for typhoon–affected uplands. FAO’s paper, for one, outlines a blueprint.The immediate calls, among other things, from field clearing, with simple two-person saws, on a cash-for-work basis, to charcoal-making using low-cost charcoal kilns developed by the Department of Science and Technology. Strengthen community nurseries to speed agroforestry recovery.In the intermediate term, uplanders need help to develop agroforestry systems that focus on high-value crops like cashew to pili. Sloping Agricultural Land Technologies, developed in Davao and other conservation measures should be incorporated into agro-forestry systems. Landslides stemming from the October earthquake in Bohol and Cebu underscore the urgency to re-forest.The long pull requires far better partnership between government, LGUs and private sector to lessons learned from decades of experience. They emphasize watershed management and requires broad multi-stakeholder participation. Adjust to local governance processes, aware that “tenure and social conflicts should be managed through negotiation.”Yolanda damaged more than 33 million coconut trees as it ripped through Quezon, Guimaras, Iloilo, Negros Occidental, Cebu, Eastern Samar and Leyte. Approximately 15 million trees were totally destroyed. Now, DENR, Philippine Coconut Authority and other agencies are crafting guidelines on how to use mounds of downed coconuts and fruit and timber trees. These provide vast volumes of woody biomass potentially available for reconstruction.DENR has provided two portable sawmills (one from Manila and one from Nasipit) to the DPWH in Region VIII, for use in sawing coconut stems into coco lumber to be used for building temporary shelter for displaced residents. How this useful initiative plays out remains to be seen.Is the upland crisis a total blank for Rehabilitation “czar” Panfilo Lacson? The windows are closing. As they say in Zamboanga’s Chavacano: Quien ta durmi, ta pierde (He who does not seize opportunities, shall lose). Locsin wants to drop ‘visas upon arrival’ privilege Kids Festival Shooter in California Took Gun Illegally PBA: Rain or Shine overcomes San Miguel, McCullough’s 51 to avert sweep LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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