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Stop lumping X & Y together

first_img continue reading » Everyone is different and every generation is different. Marketers certainly know that. There is a seismic gap between the Mature Generation and the Millenials. Even Baby Boomers and Generation X have their fundamental differences.                        However, too often we tend to lump Generation X and Generation Y together. Even their names (X & Y) are too similar. Smart marketers (and executives and boards) are wise to recognize that you must fundamentally reach these two key demographics in radically unique ways. Strauss & Howe, the leading demographers, define Generation Y as those born between 1961 and 1981 (currently between the ages of 33 and 53). Generation Y are those born between 1982 and 2003 (between ages 11 and 32). Consider these key points: Generation X is growing up, raising families and living their careers—Repeat after me: “Generation X are no longer the kids.” They are raising the kids (yes, that is a scary thought!). Gen. X live incredibly busy lives. They are the soccer moms and the entrepreneurs (and sometimes both). Generation X can actually have kids from diapers to college.Generation Y is family oriented—“We are seeing a closer relationship between generations than we have since World War II,” says Jeffery Arnet, an expert on emerging adulthood. He goes on to say, “These young people genuinely like and respect their parents.” Guess what, mom and dad? They come back! While Generation X celebrated their independence and uniqueness, Gen. Y is closer to their parents. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Hamilton home a hit pre-auction

first_img151/37 Harbour Rd, HamiltonMore from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor8 hours ago“This is a record price for this building and a return to pre-GFC prices in Brisbane,” said Ms Rudolph.“This apartment was 164sq m in total and it sold for $1.55 million just prior to auction which is absolutely brilliant for the owner. “This is a building which really did see a correction in the market after the 2011 floods and the GFC, and it has now proven itself.“We have sold the last three units in this building, all for strong prices and this one was an exceptional price record, as it was $200,000 above the same sale that we made of an identical apartment three years ago.” 151/37 Harbour Rd, HamiltonThe sellers are empty-nesters who are upsizing to accommodate their grandchildren and have bought a bigger apartment off Ms Rudolph in the same building, on the same floor.“The new owner saw the property advertised in last weekend’s Courier Mail real estate guide and his accountant called me and it was love at first sight,” Ms Rudolph said.“She told him, if he didn’t buy it, she would. “He’s a single gentleman who runs a big national company and travels extensively.” 151/37 Harbour Rd, HamiltonAUCTIONEER Philip Parker barely lifted the gavel at this morning’s Ray White Corporate in-room auctions in Brisbane.Of the four properties listed to go under the hammer, three sold beforehand and the other was passed in.The standout sale was 151/37 Harbour Road, Hamilton which sold just prior to auction for $1.55 million through Ray White New Farm sales maven Christine Rudolph.last_img read more

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Geoffrion shootout goal wins tourney

first_imgSenior tri-captain Blake Geoffrion and the Wisconsin Badgers sent the Badger Hockey Showdown out in style with a shootout victory over No. 9 Yale.[/media-credit]When the Badgers’ old winning formula of outshooting and outscoring their opponents by a wide margin was slowed, the Wisconsin men’s hockey team found a new way to win: be resilient.Facing a No. 9-ranked Yale team that outshot Wisconsin 42-22, the depleted Badgers hung on to win the final Badger Hockey Showdown in a shootout. Senior tri-captain Blake Geoffrion got the winning shootout goal as UW overcame a shorthanded roster, sloppy first period and a game misconduct to Jordy Murray to hang on to a 2-2 tie through regulation and overtime to force the shootout.UW head coach Mike Eaves said he was happy with what the Badgers showed him during the tournament.“Well, I am, because I think we were a resilient group this weekend,” he said. “I mean, we played this game with five defensemen and basically five defensemen last night too. I think the fact that we had to mix our lines up and try to find chemistry as we ran along… but I think the resiliency of this group was something that I think showed up.”Holding on to a 2-1 lead in the third period, Yale’s Brian O’Neill scored a power play goal with 2:37 to play to tie the game. The Badgers missed opportunities earlier to take a bigger lead when Ben Grotting fired a shot off the post on what should have been an easy goal, as well a botched breakaway by Aaron Bendickson.So with three of its young guns missing due to the World Junior Championship, it was two seniors who stepped up to push Wisconsin (13-5-2) to a six-game unbeaten streak. Seniors Michael Davies and Geoffrion scored in the shootout, while Yale’s third shooter, Denny Kearney was the only player to convert for the Bulldogs.Mark Arcobello was stuffed trying to go five-hole on UW goaltender Scott Gudmandson to begin the shootout. Davies was the first shooter for UW, getting the goaltender to bite and scoring easily. Gudmandson made the save on Andrew Miller, and UW’s Brendan Smith wasn’t able to convert his attempt.When Geoffrion came up as the last shooter, the senior captain had the chance to win the game for UW. He admitted he was a little nervous and surprised he got the call.“I’ve never been in that situation before, actually, right before coach said I was going to go, I got kind of shocked, I looked at (fellow senior captain Ben Street) Streeter, I said, ‘Huh?’” Geoffrion said.But the captain got Yale goaltender Nick Maricic to bite and deked to the stick side to put away the goal and seal the win.Davies scored UW’s two goals in regulation, shelving a feed from Brendan Smith to tie the game 1-1 in the second period, then taking it in alone and nudging it past Maricic at 14:11 of the period to give the Badgers a 2-1 lead. He also had three assists in the previous night’s 5-4 win over Merrimack.“I’m just getting the bounces right now, I think the whole team is,” Davies said. “And we have to keep it going the second half (of the season).”For Eaves, however, Davies brought more to the game than numbers on the box score“The other thing you notice is, geez, he made himself noticeable with his physical play. He played with an edge and he was comfortable out there,” he said. “He was one of the guys that I think kind of was flourishing in this atmosphere and this setting and in the championship kind of mindset.“As a senior, it’s nice to see that growth in him, stepping up and do those kind of things.”The Badgers were fortunate Davies played the game he did, as they looked just as out of sync against the Bulldogs Sunday as they did Saturday night against Merrimack. Playing with essentially five defensemen and mixed up lines, Wisconsin took another blow when Murray was called for a checking from behind major penalty 16:04 into the first period.But UW successfully killed off the five-minute major and went into the first intermission down just 1-0 off of Kearney’s early goal. With 1:05 of penalty left to kill to begin the second, UW quickly found its feet and tied the game up just 2:26 into the period on Davies’ first goal.Although through their first 17 games the Badgers hadn’t won a one-goal game, they now have two consecutive one-goal wins and a shootout win. In battling a lack of chemistry and a Yale scoring offense ranked No. 1 in the country, Wisconsin showed it can find a way to win no matter the odds.While Davies and Geoffrion came up clutch as the veterans on the team, the calming presence and experience of all the team’s seniors wasn’t something to be understated.“I think a lot of guys stepped up, maybe not on the scoreboard, but did a lot of good little things… blocking shots, even something as simple as getting the puck out of the zone,” Street said. “I think the leadership that we showed tonight was that we got guys to calm down, do the simple things, get back to basics — and that helped us out in the long run.”last_img read more

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DACA decision leaves students with momentary relief

first_img“From high school, a lot of kids don’t talk about [being undocumented],” she said. “There’s no club for DACA students, there’s no support or community for us. And now that I think about it, it’s really sad because a majority of the school population, would benefit from [talking about it].”  Originally, IDEAS predicted the decision would result in DACA’s termination and prepared to support students in need after the decision’s announcement. They worked with the Gould Immigration Clinic and senior director of Student Equity and Inclusion Programs Naddia Palacios to give students virtual support through a Zoom session.   “My first year finishing in USC, I applied to be an orientation adviser,” said Luis, who asked that his last name not be used for privacy reasons. “I had already made these plans — like I got the job offer — and then they asked me for my work authorization, and I thought they would accommodate and see if they could put me through other forms of payment. That’s when they kind of told me, ‘Oh, you can’t get it because of your status. I just felt really defeated about that.” Even with the future of DACA uncertain, Castillo feels content about the decision from the court and remains optimistic for future immigration reform. “I think that one of the important things to do is to not over-celebrate today’s decision because for a lot of the DACAmented community, they are still in this temporary status, which in itself can create a lot of anxiety,” Reisz said in an interview with the Daily Trojan. “I think that [with] this decision coming at this time, we should really try and harness the momentum.” In order to qualify for DACA, those who apply must meet certain requirements, including being 15 years of age with no record of felony charges. Upon meeting the age requirement, Castillo applied to DACA and later learned of the various resources including college financial assistance available to her that other undocumented students unable to qualify for DACA would not have access to.  “At first, I was just very anxious, with the uncertainty and the Supreme Court delaying [the decision],” said Luis, a rising junior majoring in political science, who migrated to Thousand Oaks at the age of 6 from Yucatan, Mexico. “I was very hesitant and was not really positive about the situation, seeing that there is a conservative majority within the Supreme Court, so I got excited to hear about it.  I think it’s just going to be opening up new opportunities for me and other people.”  Along with attempts to limit environmental regulations and to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the Trump administration decided to discontinue DACA in September 2017 when acting secretary for the Department of Homeland Security Elaine C. Duke sought to end the program, claiming it was unlawfully implemented by the past administration. Despite the announcement, challenges arose in the lower courts questioning the legality of the termination and arguing that ending DACA would impact those who are protected by the program with the removal of federal relief. In November 2018, a panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals allowed DACA to continue under the premise that the program’s fate would be determined under the Supreme Court. Following the circuit court decision, DHS appealed the decision to the high court.  The U.S. Supreme Court ruling blocking the Trump administration from terminating the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program brought feelings of happiness and relief for undocumented students like Luis. Luis, who has been applying for a U visa — set aside for victims of criminal activity against undocumented immigrants — found out about the decision with his family that morning through a text message from an internship mentor.  In anticipation of the decision, the immigration clinic released an announcement for a live Zoom webinar June 7 on their social media feeds.  The event analyzed the outcome and disseminated information on the available campus resources for students, faculty and staff, including free consultations with legal experts and access to support systems, such as the Office of Religious Life and Student Health Center, which connect undocumented students with resources such as financial aid, housing, counseling and legal support. “A lot of it is still uncertain as to how this is going to actually play out,” she said. “But definitely there’s hope. There’s hope, and I think that’s the best feeling at the moment.” However, Luis, who was also pleased with the decision, said he recognized the need for increased governmental action for undocumented people beyond the Supreme Court’s decision — including a pathway for citizenship and the opportunities for loans and property ownership. The final outcome in the case Thursday prevented the termination of DACA under the Administrative Procedure Act. On the day of the decision announcement, President Carol Folt penned a tweet in solidarity with DACA students. The Supreme Court decision was handed down Thursday, after arguments were presented in November last year. Established by the Department of Homeland Security under Barack Obama’s presidential administration, the DACA program stood as an important step to immigration reform by providing undocumented immigrants access to work authorization and government benefits.  For Selene Castillo, a rising sophomore from Guanajuato, Mexico majoring in Spanish and international relations, being undocumented has been a taboo topic since her high school years in Coachella Valley. However, when Luis decided to apply for DACA after his unsuccessful attempt to work in an on-campus job freshman year, President Donald Trump had repealed the program. Because of his situation, Luis was grateful to hear the results of the Supreme Court’s decision. center_img The webinar, co-sponsored by the Latinx/Chicanx Center for Advocacy and Student Affairs, Improving Dreams, Equality, Access, and Success at USC and the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, featured Reisz and other members from the clinic, including staff attorney Jennifer Macias and clinic co-director Niels Frenzen. Although the panelists in the webinar seemed momentarily satisfied with the decision, they warned their audience against seeing it as a guaranteed protection for DREAMers.  “Going to USC, it was a burden to apply to financial help being a DACA student,” Castillo said. “And then I know students that were undocumented with absolutely no protection and it’s even harder for them, and it’s like, they’re trying to make a living, they’re trying to educate themselves. They’re trying to become a good asset to this community, and they just don’t have the tools.” “It’s still only a Band-Aid to the broader issue,” Mendoza said. “A lot of student organizations on campus are echoing the same message, which is that Congress needs to act, and they need to act now. DACA remains a temporary fix to a long-standing issue.” Even with Thursday’s decision being the best-case scenario for DACA recipients, webinar panelist Macias stressed that new applicants may not be able to apply to DACA since the DHS has not issued any information regarding if non-DACA applicants will still be able to apply.   “We know that this decision does not provide any security for DACA recipients,” said Macias during the webinar. “But we need comprehensive immigration reform, rather than this stopgap measure that prevents the deportation of DREAMers.” Moving forward, IDEAS looks to continue advocating for immigration reform on campus by working with administrators to improve awareness of issues undocumented students face, as well as pushing for an on-campus resource center for undocumented students.  Luis, who is eligible to apply for the DACA program, chose initially not to apply because of advice from his attorney. Instead, his family began applying for a U visa during his sophomore year of high school, a visa the attorney said Luis should receive by the end of his first year of college according to a typical timeline. Yet, after his first year of college, Luis had still not received the visa and had no authorization to work in the United States.  “There are a lot of things on campus that undocumented Trojans struggle with,” Mendoza said. “We don’t have access to a lot of things, like teachers who are informed of our status, and sometimes, we need extra support that a lot of people don’t need if they’re citizens, so we were really pushing for that. The next step is to let our allies know that although DACA was saved, DREAMers are not entirely satisfied. We will not stop fighting until we have a clean pathway to citizenship … We are far from immigration reform, but this win will help keep us motivated to continue.” “DACA was never meant to be a long-term solution … With DACA, you just get authorization to work in the U.S., but you don’t get access to other things,” Luis said. “Although they might not come from typical American roots where you’re born here, they grew up here, were immersed in the culture, and this is what they know as home.” Karen Mendoza, president of IDEAS at USC, an organization advocating for and bringing awareness to issues affecting undocumented students, said that the decision is not a final solution and highlights additional work that needs to be done to support DACA students.  “We currently do not know whether there will be new applications for DACA accepted because as of right now, the DACA memorandum can be rescinded again — the only thing that the Trump administration has to do is give valid reasons as to why it’s rescinding DACA,” Macias said. (Julianna Pantoja | Daily Trojan) “For our program, we were going to have a Zoom centered around helping our students cope with the anxiety and devastation that would come with the termination of DACA, so our whole entire program was different,” Mendoza said. “Right after the decision on Thursday, we were going to have meetings all night and on Friday, we were going to offer our students support, but that didn’t happen, so it was a more calm and relieving Thursday.” However, Jean Reisz, co-director of the Gould School of Law Immigration Clinic, referred to the result of the Supreme Court as a “procedural decision” and said the government will still be able to declare the DACA program illegitimate with reasonable justification. While attending a high school class in September 2017, one of Castillo’s instructors pulled her out of class, informing her of the Trump administration’s decision to phase out DACA, a decision that would limit undocumented students from applying. Although the news came as a shock to her and many of her peers, Castillo considered herself lucky since she had applied to DACA before the discontinuation. last_img read more

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Homeland Security: tighten immigration for DACA

first_imgThe Trump Admistraton is seeking ways to tighten legal immigration in exchange for making DACA permanentAttorney Caroly PedersenAs President Trump calls on Congress to make DACA permanent in exchange for reforms, his Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is secretly working behind the scenes and making unilateral changes to existing policies which will tighten requirements and reduce overall immigration without the need for Congressional approval.These new policies are already having major effects throughout the entire legal immigration system.  Legal work visa policy changes have been implemented under the H-1B program which have retroactively changed the requirements and caused thousands of visa denials.Directives to Consular officers Consular officers have been given more authority to re-adjudicate approved cases and deny visas for cases previously approved by the USCIS and to deny student visas. This is based primarily on the officers “subjective” belief that the applicant does not intend to return to their home country after their US studies are completed.Asylum review guidelines for officers have been modified to provide more restrictive interpretation of the proof necessary for eligibility. USCIS officers are encouraged to apply the strictest standards to each application, leading to increased requests for evidence and denials for minor technical errors.Other policy changes include the recently announced 90-day rule which  abruptly replaced the existing 30/60 day rule. Under this strict new rule, any application for change of status or adjustment, or even marriage to a US Citizen made within 90 days of entering the US will result in an automatic presumption of “pre-conceived intent,” meaning that it will be presumed by the government that at the time the visitor entered the US, he or she made a “willful misrepresentation” to the officer at the border, which could result in potential revocation of their visa.DHS exploring other changesSimilarly, the DHS is exploring other subtle changes to immigration policies that could have major consequences, including eliminating work authorizations for spouses of professional workers and restricting STEM students to only 12 months of work authorization, rather than allowing  them to have an additional two extra years.Other measures being considered may simply just slow down the visa issuance process, so as to significantly reduce yearly levels of legal immigration. This is already being implemented to a degree by a new policy requiring that all employment based residency applicants undergo an interview at local USCIS offices prior to Green Card approval.There are still other measures being considered that could significantly slow down family cases and also naturalization processing (which currently already takes up to a year in some jurisdictions) even more. This would effectively disqualify many immigrants from voting in the 2018 mid-term general elections, to benefit Republican candidates.As a result, it is even more important than ever for US citizens and residents file to sponsor family members in order to avoid even more delays in processing, and for residents to file for Naturalization now, to give themselves a chance of becoming a US citizen before the 2018 Midterm elections.last_img read more

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Sanitizing Genocide: Media Still Excuses Abortion

first_imgThe intentional killing of human life by the millions should rank as one of modern society’s greatest evils, yet the media continue to not only rationalize it, but advocate it.Even the left felt uncomfortable last week when ‘comedian’ Michelle Wolf told jokes about abortion, saying “Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it” and “When you do try it, really knock it. You know, you’ve got to get that baby out of there.” Conservatives and Christians, naturally, were outraged and grief-stricken that anyone would display such shameless flippancy about killing what she acknowledged was a “baby” in the womb. The serious mainstream science media may not tell jokes, but they treat the unborn with similar disregard.Some women feel grief after an abortion, but there’s no evidence of serious mental health issues (Medical Xpress). The question before the public should be, “Is this baby a human life? Is this baby a person?” Leftist abortion advocates, like Kirsten Black at The Conversation, always focus on the mother’s “mental health” instead, as a distraction from the big question. “Overall they found that abortion does not increase a woman’s risk of experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress, depression or anxiety,” Black writes. “In fact, those who are denied abortion initially have higher levels of anxiety than women obtaining an abortion.” But can any study, or any statistic, justify what abortionists do to the life inside her womb? See the videos that demonstrate the practices at AbortionProcedures.com, where a former abortion doctor shows what he himself did to hundreds of unborn babies.Women should have right to reject pregnancy, experts say (Science Daily). Well, if “experts” say something, it must be authoritative, right? Remember, we’re talking about individual human beings with their own bodies, brains, and genes (half from the father) being snuffed out. Listen to the “experts” in this article:“We emphasise that to accept that abortion should be decriminalised for this reason is not to adopt the view that abortion is morally acceptable, but rather to recognise that there is no basis for the law to criminalise abortion as an act which has not conclusively been demonstrated to be morally unacceptable.”Not demonstrated by whom? Millions of people believe abortion is morally unacceptable! How can Dr Andrew McGee presume to speak for them? One can imagine similar arguments being used by “experts” in Nazi Germany to justify what they did. McGee’s use of “should” is his own attempt to impose his own morality on everyone else. And aren’t leftists the very ones who complain about Christians and conservatives trying to shove their morality down other people’s throats? When, oh, when, will Science Daily or any of the other “mainstream” science news outlets give a voice to the pro-life side?Iowa governor signs nation’s strictest abortion law (Barbara Rodriguez, Associated Press). Anything printed with the Associated Press seal of approval on it is bound to be republished verbatim by  practically every mainstream news service in the world, so watch for the spin here.The bill signing came shortly after the Iowa affiliates of Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union warned that they would sue the governor if she signed the bill, which the Republican-controlled Legislature approved during after-hours votes earlier in the week.“We will challenge this law with absolutely everything we have on behalf of our patients because Iowa will not go back,” Suzanna de Baca, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the Heartland, said in a statement.Although the article provides a few token statements from pro-lifers, Rodriguez clearly gives more space and passion to critics of the bill, including the largest abortion provider in the country, Planned Parenthood: you know, the ones who make money selling body parts of aborted babies to conscience-deprived secular scientists.Other Leftist Propaganda Posing as ScienceStatus threat, not economic hardship, explains the 2016 presidential vote (PNAS). Diana Mutz gets prime time in the most prestigious science journal in America to promote her own leftist opinion. If you voted for Donald Trump, she argues in a pseudo-scientific political post, you’re probably just a white person afraid of losing your traditional position in an evolving society: “changing preferences were related to changes in the party’s positions on issues related to American global dominance and the rise of a majority–minority America: issues that threaten white Americans’ sense of dominant group status.” When did science journals turn into political propaganda for the left? These days, it’s almost unimaginable that a conservative scholar would get a hearing on this prime platform.Leftists are life-despisers and totalitarians. They want to drastically reduce human presence on this planet. Abortion is just one facet of their misanthropic mindset; eugenics is another. They also want to force everyone to think like they do, and they will scream hate speech at anyone who disagrees. They are masters of euphemism and misdirection (hear Michael Knowles explain this at Prager University, “Control the Words, Control the Culture.”). Lovers of Darwin, they are the intellectual and societal heirs of Karl Marx, whose 200th birthday yesterday was NOT an occasion for celebration (Breitart 1, Breitbart 2). The solution? Keep leftists out of office, don’t ever trust them with power, and do the right thing even when they scream.(Visited 358 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Montreal Police hold Indigenous sensitivity training sessions – but is it working

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsHow Montreal police use the Indigenous sensitivity training they receive is the subject of some controversy.The courses have been ongoing for three years.But given some of the mis-steps from the police, is the training working?Inuit people who hang out in Cabot Square are often ticketed for loitering, or public drunkenness.And this past summer, an Inuk woman was released from custody in the middle of the night in a vacant part of [email protected]@tomfennariolast_img read more

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Road Health Safety for Back to School

first_img Related Items:back to school for TCI Students, road and health safety for back to school Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, September 5, 2016 – Children looked really smart today… it is great to see them back in this element… and the traffic, well it is what it is.  We all need to ensure that we adhere to the speed limits in our school zones and follow other road safety and personal safety rules… washing hands, fending off mosquitoes and being alert as we use our streets.  last_img read more

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