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Eric Clapton Documentary Soundtrack To Feature Five Previously Unreleased Clapton Tracks

first_imgThe original soundtrack for the new Eric Clapton documentary Life in 12 Bars features five previously unreleased tracks by the guitar legend. Slated for release on June 8th, the compilation is a companion to the Lili Fini Zanuck-directed documentary, which debuted on Showtime earlier this year.Among those newly-released slices of Clapton’s greatness is a 17-minute live version of “Spoonful” recorded during an October 1968 Cream show at the LA Forum. The soundtrack also features two Derek and The Dominos offerings, including a version of “High” recored during the 1971 Olympic Studios sessions for their unreleased second album, and a cover Jimi Hendrix’s “Little Wing” that wa recorded on at the Fillmore East on October 24, 1971, just a few weeks after Hendrix’s death.Additionally, the soundtrack includes the previously unreleased full-length version of Clapton’s 1974 take on “I Shot The Sheriff”, which was recorded during the sessions for 461 Ocean Boulevard. Finally, a live performance Chuck Berry’s “Little Queenie” from a July 1974 show at the Long Beach Arena can be found on the soundtrack as well.On top of all that, the release features two alternative mixes of Clapton’s debut album: one mx from Delaney Bramlett and Tom Dowd, and another from Clapton himself.The Life In 12 Bars soundtrack will be available in 2-CD, 4-LP, and digital formats. In total, the compilation showcases 32 tracks by The Yardbirds, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek and the Dominos, The Beatles, Aretha Franklin, Muddy Waters and Clapton solo. Fans can preorder it via Amazon, and the full track list can be found below.Life In 12 Bars trailerLIFE IN 12 BARS DOCUMENTARY OST:DISC ONE                                                            Big Bill Broonzy: Backwater Blues (4.07) The Big Bill Broonzy Story 1957Muddy Waters: My Life Is Ruined (2.38) Chess single 1953Muddy Waters: I Got Mojo Working (4.28) Live At Newport Jazz Festival 1960The Yardbirds: I Wish You Would (2.19) – studio versionThe Yardbirds: For Your Love (2.30) For Your Love 1965John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers: Steppin’ Out (2.29) John Mayall Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton 1966John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers: All Your Love (3.37) John Mayall Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton 1966Cream: I Feel Free (2.57) Fresh Cream 1966  Cream: Strange Brew (2.50) Disraeli Gears 1967Cream: Sunshine of Your Love (4.12) – studio versionAretha Franklin: Good to Me As I Am To You (3.58) Lady Soul / Recorded on December 16 and 17, 1967                       Cream: Crossroads live (4.18) Wheels Of Fire / Recorded 10 March 1968 at Winterland, San Francisco, CA16The Beatles: While My Guitar Gently Weeps (4.45) The Beatles / Recorded 5–6 September 1968Cream: Badge (2.48) Goodbye / Recorded October 1968 at IBC Studios in London     Cream: White Room live (5.41) Live Cream II / recorded October 4, 1968 at the Oakland Coliseum ArenaCream: Spoonful (17.27) live from Goodbye tour – LA Forum October 19, 1968 ^^Blind Faith: Presence Of The Lord (4.52) – studio version                                                                                                                               DISC TWO                                                          Delaney & Bonnie & Friends featuring Eric Clapton: Comin’ Home (7.51) Live at Fairfield Halls  Eric Clapton: After Midnight (3.25) alternate mix from Eric Clapton (first album) 1970Eric Clapton: Let It Rain (5.00) alternate mix from Eric Clapton (first album) 1970Derek and The Dominos: High (3.10) (Olympic Studios, April 1971) Derek and The Dominos album^^         George Harrison: My Sweet Lord (4.44) All Things Must Pass 1970Derek and The Dominos: Thorn Tree In The Garden (2.55) Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs 1970Derek and The Dominos: Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out (5.01) Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs 1970Derek and The Dominos: Bell Bottom Blues (5.08) Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs 1970Derek and The Dominos: Layla (7.10) Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs 1970Derek and The Dominos: Little Wing (6.11) Live At The Fillmore 1970 ^^Derek and The Dominos: Got To Get Better In A Little While (6.05) – studio versionEric Clapton: I Shot The Sheriff (6.54) full length version from 461 Ocean Blvd 1970 ^^Eric Clapton: Little Queenie live (6.00) Long Beach Arena, Long Beach, California, July 19/20, 1974 ^^Eric Clapton: Mainline Florida (4.08) 461 Ocean Boulevard 1974Eric Clapton: Tears In Heaven (4.31) – studio versionlast_img read more

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Northfield Savings introduces Moola Hoopla

first_imgNORTHFIELD SAVINGS BANK ADDS BOUNCE TO HALFTIME AT CATS GAMESMoola Hoopla Gives Fans A Chance To Win $50,000 $25,000 For TheShooter And $25,000 For The Victory ClubNorthfield, VermontJanuary 10, 2005Vermont Catamount fans havesomething new to cheer for at half time as Cats sponsor NorthfieldSavings Bank rolls out Moola Hoopla this week. At all men and womensregular season home games, one lucky spectator will have a chance to win$50,000–$25,000 cash for the participant and $25,000 which will bedonated to the Vermont Catamount Victory Club.The randomly selected fan must sink two consecutive shots from a place oftheir choice on the court. The catch is that they must sink one shot ineach basket from that spot.Vermont Athletics enjoys such widespread support among Vermonters that wewanted to offer an exciting promotion that would be fun to watch, andbenefit both the fans and the Athletic Department, says Patricia Sears,Senior Marketing Manager of Northfield Savings Bank. This approach ofrewarding a fan AND contributing to the University is consistent withNSBs policy of donating 10% of our profits back to Vermont communityorganizations, adds Sears.Moola Hoopla is a great partnership between two outstandinginstitutional members of Vermonts community Northfield Savings bank andthe University of Vermont. “We are fortunate to have such a greatpartnership with Northfield Savings Bank. Moola Hoopla is a very excitingpromotion for our fans and has added even more energy to our gameentertainment,” comments Krista Balogh, Director of Marketing & Promotionsfor Vermont Athletics.last_img read more

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The Misfortune of Gold in Colombia

first_imgBy Myriam Ortega/Diálogo August 29, 2017 Excelente la información, muy estructurada y soportada, de tal forma que denota claramente la importante labor de la Fuerza Pública en su lucha contra la minería ilegal que tanto daño causa en las personas y en el ambiente, más tratándose de la a explotación ilegal de oro por el uso indebido del mercurio. In coordinated operations between the Colombian Navy (by way of its Southern Naval Force), Army, Air Force, and the Colombian National Police’s Environmental and Ecological Protection Group, four homemade dredgers used for illegal gold mining were seized in the department of Guaviare. The dredges ensured a monthly gold production of $40,000. The operation, which took place in July, resulted in the capture of eight people red-handed. Simultaneously, in the areas surrounding Amacayacú National Park, above the Cothué River, in the department of Amazonas, four more dredgers that had produced $122,000 per month in illegal gold were rendered unusable. Among other tools found were 30 black sieving mats, six diving suits, and two gold smelters. Key to success “The Air Force is a key part of it, with its reconnaissance flights and the photographs they take, which were the first on which we based our planning,” Brigadier General Adolfo León Hernández Martínez, the commander of the Colombian Army’s 27th Jungle Brigade, told Diálogo. “The Southern Naval Force and Army forces jointly intervened with help from the Marine Corps, and arrived at the sites where the dredgers were.” To coordinate the operation, other entities attended meetings called “bubbles,” in which institutions with different resources and capacities work towards the common goal of fighting environmental crime. This strategy emerged more than 10 years ago with the creation of joint commands. “When we want to fight crime and attack a problem that’s become rather critical, what we do is form a bubble in which the different institutions focus on that aspect, on that crime,” Brig. Gen. Hernández noted. “All of us bring to the table everything we’ve got to fight that crime.” Coca and illegal gold are the products of a criminal network that benefit only large criminal structures. Growers and miners alike are victims of extortion, and they are the ones who earn the least from this enterprise. “The illegal value of the enterprise [illegal gold mining] moves a lot of money, but most of it ends up in the criminal organizations that are getting rich off of it,” Brig. Gen. Hernández indicated. “Organizations such as the Gulf Clan, or all the other organized armed groups whose tentacles reach into these areas, are involved in this.” According to a report by the Colombian Army’s Special Brigade against Illegal Mining, organized crime’s earnings come at a very high environmental and social cost. “Mineral exploration and extraction, done without compliance with legal requirements, has become one of the main sources of financing for illegal armed groups and criminal organizations.” Illegal gold’s footprint Colonel Ricardo Alberto Suárez Rátiva, the commander of the 3rd Marine Corps Brigade, explained to Diálogo that amateur miners use mercury in their mining process. “To get one gram of gold, the ratio is more or less two grams of mercury, it’s two to one. And a special connotation is that Colombia does not produce mercury. However, the use of that metallic chemical element in gold mining represents a hazard not only to those who handle it. “The mercury issue can manifest as cancer, or as deformities in babies and sterility in men,” Col. Suárez added. “It can also affect people’s nervous system.” The populations where illegal mining is carried out are therefore more vulnerable to illness and deformities, among other things. In addition to the illegal and/or toxic homemade methods used, illegal gold mining carries environmental costs. According to the Office of the Attorney General of Colombia, the risk of erosion, the release of toxins, watershed degradation, and the displacement of fauna are all a result of it. Scope Throughout 2017, the Southern Naval Force has destroyed 25 dredgers used for illegal resource mining, a significant achievement in countering this activity. “We’ve cleaned up illegal mining and mining sites along approximately 600 kilometers of river,” Col. Suárez stated. “But we’re still continuing these actions against criminal organizations and locating the structures that are devoted to this activity.” “At this time, with FARC terrorists no longer present in these Amazon territories, we’re directing all of the military capacities we’ve developed at environmental crimes,” Brig. Gen. Hernández added. “And those crimes include illegal mining and mining sites.”last_img read more

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US and Argentine Marines Exchange Knowledge

first_imgBy Juan Delgado/Diálogo January 23, 2019 On the beaches of Punta Alta, in Buenos Aires province, Argentina, units of the Argentine Navy’s Marine Corps Command practice hand-to-hand combat techniques. They work on blows, kicks, strangling, and other techniques to stop a possible aggressor, as well as cushion falls or minimize injuries. With helmets and boxing gloves on, they improve their punches. They also practice using knives with the proper force. Their physical training regimen is rigorous and includes push-ups on the seashore and on the sand, until exhaustion. The week-long training was part of a knowledge exchange between instructors of U.S. Marine Corps Forces, South (MARFORSOUTH) and their Argentine counterparts. Three MARFORSOUTH instructors led the training at the Instruction and Assessment Command (COIE, in Spanish) of Baterías Marine Corps Naval Base from November 26 to December 1, 2018. “The training consisted of exchanging techniques and procedures in hand-to-hand combat through the implementation of different theoretical, but mainly hands-on, activities,” Argentine Navy Captain Javier Pedro López, commander of COIE, told Diálogo. “It was conducted with a significant component in terms of improving leadership skills, considering that the participants comprised personnel already trained as instructors in the field.” Solving conflict situations The objective of the training was to improve hand-to-hand combat efficiency, based on tactical procedures and maneuvers used in different disciplines, such as martial arts, boxing, and wrestling, among others. The program focused on conflict analysis, planning, and resolution, and sought to reinforce participants’ knowledge of combat physiology and psychology, key tenets of security. Service members trained in techniques and procedures for knife combat, different types of cuts, and weapons of opportunity. Participants also benefited from theoretical instruction about mental discipline and the fundamental values marines share. For Capt. López, the MARFORSOUTH training is important because it helps maximize Argentinean marines’ knowledge in combat situations in the style of the U.S. Marine Corps. “In the modern operational environment, characterized by very close-quarters combat and contact, the need to intervene against combatants and non-combatants, in addition to respecting specific rules of engagement [for the use of force], demands giving our marines the tools to fulfill the mission effectively,” said Capt. López. U.S. marines have a unique combat system, developed in the early 2000s. The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program combines existing and new hand-to-hand and close-quarters combat techniques with honor, courage, and commitment values. The program emphasizes character development, including the responsible use of force, leadership, and teamwork. Mutual advantage The training was equally advantageous for MARFORSOUTH instructors, who learned from their Argentinean counterparts during their week-long stay at Baterías Base. The exchange also allowed participants to strengthen the sense of fraternity and camaraderie, as well as interoperability, an essential element when conducting combined exercises or operations. “I am convinced that these activities enable us to work side-by-side,” said Capt. López. “I believe that there is mutual benefit in conducting these activities, as it helps forge bonds of professional trust among marine corps units.” The Argentine Navy, and particularly the Marine Corps Command, has a long-standing friendship with the United States, including several exchange programs between marines. Exchanges and other support programs allow participants to share knowledge and skills, as well as history and culture, which strengthen cooperation between both countries. “The combined exercises we conducted throughout the years are countless,” said Admiral José Luis Villán, chairman of the Argentine Navy General Staff, who trained at the Expeditionary Warfare School at Marine Corps Base Quantico, in Virginia. “Currently, our relationship is at its best in terms of cooperative exchanges of all kinds, which contribute to better understanding and institutional interoperability.”last_img read more

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UF needs help to gain matching funds for its O’Connell room

first_img December 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News UF needs help to gain matching funds for its O’Connell room Associate Editor Walking into Stephen C. O’Connell’s study at his Tallahassee home was like walking into a shrine of Florida history.There’s the picture of the University of Florida president as a student in 1938, a middleweight undefeated champ in the boxing ring, captain of the team.There’s one of O’Connell smiling with the pope.Autographed photos of retired justices, along with personal notes, are reminders of the years O’Connell served on the Florida Supreme Court from 1955 to 1967.An honorary degree from Florida State University prompted O’Connell to declare: “I got a degree from FSU, but I obtained my education at Florida!”The study was the gathering place during the annual barbecue hosted by O’Connell for the throng of college students interested in government and the law, who loved to hear the remarkable man’s many stories.And the study was the very place O’Connell took his last breath on April 14, 2001, at the age of 85.Former colleague and family friend Tallahassee lawyer Crit Smith was talking to O’Connell’s widow, Cindy, about all those mementoes. Cindy O’Connell wondered what in the world to do with her husband’s historic possessions, as well as his desk where he pondered and penned important thoughts.“I said, ‘So many student leaders who now have gone forth to be leaders in Florida politics have come through this room,’” Smith recalled. “‘Wouldn’t it be nice if you could move it intact to the university as a museum?’”The reaction from Cindy O’Connell was instant delight, and she carried forth the idea to what is now a fund-raising drive to create the Justice Stephen C. O’Connell Supreme Court Reading Room at the UF Levin College of Law, Legal Information Center.“The reading room is a concept to share Stephen O’Connell’s love for the law, love for the University of Florida, and to share that with students as they go through law school, as well as alums,” Cindy O’Connell said.“Steve, of all things, loved students. After he left the presidency, the 30 years after that until his death, he was close to all age groups, as a mentor, giving advice, sharing his stories.”The push for contributions for the O’Connell Supreme Court Reading Room coincides with the UF law school expansion. Plans are underway to raise an additional $1.3 million by the end of the year toward renovation of the existing Holland Hall Law Center, named after former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator Spessard Holland, a 1916 UF law grad.Included is a major addition to the law library, with the resulting 80,751-square-foot facility to be named the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center, after the late governor and U.S. senator who earned his UF law degree in 1955. Upgrading and enlarging the library and teaching facilities, Dean Jon Mills said, is critical for retaining American Bar Association accreditation. The expansion, he said, will place the center among the top 20 of 182 academic law libraries in the country, in terms of space.Mills praised the leadership of UF President Charles Young and Provost David Colburn in designating funds to supplement the private fund-raising effort.“With the $6.3 million we raised and the state matching funds for this priority UF project, plus the $12.6 million provided by President Young and the university, we have a major part of what we need to provide first-class facilities to match first-class students and faculty,” Mills said in a prepared statement.As for the O’Connell project, the clock is ticking to complete the fund-raising campaign by December 31 — with a $500,000 goal — in order to receive state matching funds. Any gifts or five-year pledges must be documented before January 4, 2003, to qualify.The vision for the reading room is not only to house O’Connell’s mementoes but also to be a place of recognition for all Florida Supreme Court justices who are UF alumni, through a display of portraits, photographs, articles, and historical documents. The room will be a place to study for law students, as well as a gathering place for faculty and alumni events.Cindy O’Connell said though she is very pleased about the project, she admitted “the hard part will be releasing all of the mementoes. But Stephen O’Connell was never mine. He was the state’s and everyone else’s. I learned that a long time ago.” For more information on contributing to the Holland Hall Renovation Project Building Fund and/or the O’Connell Reading Room, contact the University of Florida Levin College of Law, P.O. Box 14412, Gainesville, FL 32604-4412, phone: 352-392-9296, fax: 352-392-3434. Checks should be made payable to the University of Florida Foundation, Inc. UF needs help to gain matching funds for its O’Connell roomlast_img read more

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Huntington Station Shooting Leaves 1 Dead, 1 Hurt

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A teenager was killed and a 31-year-old man was wounded in a shooting in the teen’s hometown of Huntington Station over the weekend, Suffolk County police said.Antoine Butts-Miller, 18, was standing on 5th Avenue with a large group of people when he and another man were shot at 3:30 a.m. Saturday, police said.The victims were taken to Huntington Hospital, where the teen was pronounced dead, and the second victim was treated and released.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on the shooting to call them at 631-852-6394 or call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.last_img read more

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Royal Mail site gets sorted

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Finn touched by shirt request

first_img “It (his appetite) has been challenged. But when you come into camp and you get this group of people it (enthusiasm) comes flooding back. I will speak to the players and I fancy doing this again,” he said. “We have started something. I wish we had done this three years ago when I first started. We know where we are now and people who have been in the camp say they have enjoyed it. We’ve worked them hard but we’ve had a good time. “We are giving people opportunities and not just the players, the backroom staff too who are working 14 hours a day for these players. The desire is there, the backroom staff are up for it and as long as they don’t sack us, we will probably go round again.” The difference between Ireland and Australia was clear on the field in Limerick on Saturday night, but there was no disparity in the ego stakes as Wolfhounds captain Liam Finn enjoyed a special moment in his career. Finn is a journeyman professional who, while excelling for Featherstone in the Championship, has never played in England’s top flight and works full-time as an electrician. The 30-year-old was powerless to stop Australia steamrollering his side 50-0 at Thomond Park but was surprised when opposite number Cooper Cronk asked him for his shirt. Cronk is rated as one of the world’s best half-backs and it would have been expected that Finn would have been the one doing any asking, but the latter thinks the turn of events show how much the Australians care about the state of the game in Ireland. “The camaraderie between the players and the things after the game have been fantastic,” Finn said. “To put it in perspective, Cooper Cronk asked me to swap shirts after the game and I play second division rugby league in England and he’s the best half-back in the world; he wants to swap shirts with me. They are the type of players you get in rugby league. “He’s aspiring to be just like me – let’s see if he can get a game in the Championship next season! When people like that want to talk to you, you do. The message we get from the NRL players is they want the game to develop and they’re secure enough in that knowledge to want to pass it on.” For his part Cronk was more than happy to take Finn’s shirt as a keepsake, saying: “This is the first time I have been to Limerick and I have had the chance to experience a powerhouse of rugby union in Munster. I’m just as proud to represent my country as the captain of Ireland is who plays second division.” The fruits of Ireland’s trek into union heartland at Munster’s ground may not be immediate but coach Mark Aston is hopeful they will eventually come. The crowd of 5,021 was a record for the sport in Ireland and while a 50-point flogging to mark Ireland’s expected exit from the competition may not have been the best advert, the skill of Australia was at least something to behold. Aston has previously voiced frustrations at how the game is run on the Emerald Isle but claims he is ready and willing to keep going in the bid to bridge the gap between his side and the best. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Hallifield Schools Students Bag Tennis CertificatesÂ

first_img“Hallifield Schools embraces sports and are giving more rooms to our students to participate in sporting activities,” Adebisi Obaloluwa, the Coordinator of Lawn Tennis Club at Hallifield Schools, said.He enthused that more players would join given the significant progress that had been made since the programme began early this year, pointing out that apart from enhancing the fitness of the students; the programme had lots of benefits as some of the students could build a career in the sport.Obaloluwa stressed that the avenue for students to rise to stardom had already been created by the school in sports and in all other human endeavours.Six of the students; Tunmise Ayobanjo, Destiny Nebedum, Kamsi Ehenemba, Fendi Igbinigie, Farah Bush and Fayokunmi Semasa-Talabi bagged medals for their outstanding performances at the conclusion of the session.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Hallifield School students are gradually showing great potential in tennis with 15 of its students bagging a certificate from a coaching programme from MP Tiger Tennis in Lagos.MP Tiger Tennis boss, Paul Moses described the students as budding talents after the end of the second session of the training at the Lagos Country Club, Ikeja recently.Moses, a United Kingdom Professional Tennis Registry certified coach, lauded the enthusiasm of the students who ranged from 6-12 years.last_img read more

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Syracuse splits doubleheader against Penn, Central Michigan

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 4, 2017 at 6:29 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcCleary Syracuse split its games on Saturday against Pennsylvania and Central Michigan in Tampa, Florida.SU (12-6) beat Penn (2-2), 7-3, in a game the Orange didn’t get going until the fourth inning. The Quakers held a one-run lead through the third inning and extended it to three in the fourth with a Lainey Dorris home run. In the bottom of the inning, SU scored its first run off of a home run by Sydney O’Hara. Still, the Quakers stayed strong, getting out of the inning holding onto a two-run lead.In the fifth, O’Hara provided another RBI for SU, closing the gap to one. In the sixth inning, a single by sophomore infielder Alicia Hansen brought in two and sparked a five-run inning for the Orange. O’Hara, a senior, pitched the top of the seventh and struck out all three batters, securing Syracuse’s victory.While offense was hard to come by for much of the game, freshman pitcher Alexa Romero came in and did what she has done in six of her 10 appearances this season — she didn’t allow a single run in the circle. That and O’Hara’s five strikeouts helped SU keep the score close and win.Against Central Michigan (8-6), the Orange did not score a run in the first three innings. SU didn’t score a run in the remaining four innings, either. The Orange lost 3-0 despite the Chippewas recording only one more hit than SU. Central Michigan pitcher Rachael Knapp dominated.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU’s AnnaMarie Gatti started the game for SU and failed to get out of the second inning, allowing two runs before she was pulled. Romero came in and kept Syracuse close by allowing only one run. The defense was solid for the rest of the game, before O’Hara came in and shut out Central Michigan through the final two frames.But Syracuse left eight runners on base, struck out out nine times and didn’t draw a single walk.Syracuse begins conference play next Friday at North Carolina State. Commentslast_img read more

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