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Subglacial geology and geomorphology of the Pensacola‐Pole Basin, East Antarctica

first_imgThe East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is underlain by a series of low‐lying subglacial sedimentary basins. The extent, geology and basal topography of these sedimentary basins are important boundary conditions governing the dynamics of the overlying ice sheet. This is particularly pertinent for basins close to the grounding line wherein the EAIS is grounded below sea level, and therefore potentially vulnerable to rapid retreat. Here, we analyze newly acquired airborne geophysical data over the Pensacola‐Pole Basin (PPB), a previously unexplored sector of the EAIS. Using a combination of gravity, magnetic and ice‐penetrating radar data, we present the first detailed subglacial sedimentary basin model for the PPB. Radar data reveal that the PPB is defined by a topographic depression situated ~500 m below sea level. Gravity and magnetic depth‐to‐source modeling indicate that the southern part of the basin is underlain by a sedimentary succession 2–3 km thick. This is interpreted as an equivalent of the Beacon Supergroup and associated Ferrar dolerites that are exposed along the margin of East Antarctica. However, we find that similar rocks appear to be largely absent from the northern part of the basin, close to the present‐day grounding line. In addition, the eastern margin of the basin is characterized by a major geological boundary and a system of overdeepened subglacial troughs. We suggest that these characteristics of the basin may reflect the behavior of past ice sheets and/or exert an influence on the present‐day dynamics of the overlying EAIS.last_img read more

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Altera Infrastructure announces Petrojarl Knarr contract extension

first_img Altera Infrastructure extends Petrojarl Knarr contract. (Credit: David Mark from Pixabay.) Altera Infrastructure L.P. (the “Partnership”) today announced that its subsidiary Teekay Knarr AS has entered into a contract amendment with AS Norske Shell, as operator for and on behalf of the Knarr field licence partners (the “Operator”), that extends the contract for the lease and operation of the Petrojarl Knarr FPSO (the “Vessel”) until at least March 2022.The vessel has been operating on the Knarr field since 2015 under a firm duration until March 2021, which included a further fee payable by the Operator if the contract was not extended through to 2025 and with additional extension options thereafter. The contract amendment includes a reduction in day rate from March 2021 to March 2022 and the removal of the fee payable by the Operator if the contract was not extended, in return for the introduction of an additional production volume and oil price related tariff. The amendment also terminates the Operator’s purchase option for the vessel and provides for a mutual right to terminate the contract on 6 months’ notice without payment of penalty, such termination not to be effective before March 2022.“We are pleased to announce this important FPSO contract extension for the Petrojarl Knarr, and we are committed to work together with the licence partners to continue to operate safely and maximize production on the field. The contract amendment provides important visibility for the next period of operations and it also enables us to position the vessel for the next re-deployment”, says Chris Brett, President Altera Infrastructure FPSO. Altera Infrastructure, previously Teekay Offshore, owns and has been operating the FPSO since it achieved first oil on 16th March 2015. Source: Company Press Release Altera Infrastructure is a global energy infrastructure services provider focused on the ownership and operation of critical infrastructure assetslast_img read more

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Savills snaps up two independent NW businesses including leading new-build specialist

first_imgSavills has snapped up two independent agencies in Manchester and Cheshire and say the purchase is part of a plan to expand its presence in the North West of England.The £736-million international firm has acquired sales, lettings and property management company Case McNair as well as the Knutsford branch of a similar agency, Meller Braggins, adding to its existing tally of branches in Manchester, Wilmslow and Chester.The larger of the two deals is the acquisition of Case McNair, which operates across the huge Greater Manchester area and has a rental portfolio worth more than £200 million. It specialises in the region’s booming new-build 100+ unit rental market and employs 15 staff.New northern bossManaging Director John-Paul Case will be remaining with the business and will head up Savills’ northern metropolitan lettings business.His former employees will initially remain at their branch on Bridge Street in Manchester before transferring to Savills city centre office next year.“Case McNair has an excellent reputation in Manchester and internationally and this acquisition provides a strategic opportunity for us to expand the services we offer in the area, complementing our existing residential development sales business operating out of our Manchester office,” says Jane Cronwright-Brown, head of the lettings division at Savills (left).The acquisition of Meller Braggins; Knutsford branch, is being handled differently. Its senior team including managing director Nigel Lammas will join Savills while their former business will be run by Charlie Kannreuther, who has a six-year track record at Savills. Meller Braggins has four remaining branches in Wilmslow, Northwich, Stockton Heath and Macclesfield.Charlie will be supported by Rebecca Postles and Tom Burke will head up the lettings department.John-Paul Case Meller Braggins Nigel Lammas Savills Savills acquisition Case McNair October 11, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Savills snaps up two independent NW businesses including leading new-build specialist previous nextAgencies & PeopleSavills snaps up two independent NW businesses including leading new-build specialistCase McNair and Knutsford branch of Meller Braggins are soon to be subsumed into Savills’ operation in the region.Nigel Lewis11th October 201802,257 Viewslast_img read more

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Contributing Faculty (MOT/OTD)

first_imgCollaborative – Works cooperatively with others across theinstitution and beyond, including the community and throughpartnerships. Represents own interests while being inclusive andfair to others. ADDITIONAL COMPETENCIESTo perform the job successfully, an individual should demonstratethe following competencies to perform the essential functions ofthe position:Core Ethics and Values Recommends course improvements for upcoming semester Promotes professionalism by modeling such behaviors inside andoutside the classroom setting; promotes inter-professionaldialogCollaborates with necessary departments to support a positiveteam environmentUpholds University core values, policies and proceduresOTHER DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIESMay perform other duties and responsibilities that management maydeem necessary from time to time.TRAVEL REQUIREMENTSSome travel may be required.POSITION IN ORGANIZATIONREPORTS TO: Academic Program DirectorPOSITIONS SUPERVISED: NoneTECHNICAL, MANAGERIAL, and PEOPLE SKILLS REQUIREDTo perform this job successfully an individual must be able toperform each essential duty satisfactorily. The requirements listedbelow are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or abilityrequired. Incumbents will be evaluated, in part, based onperformance of each essential function. Appropriate reasonableaccommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilitiesto perform essential functions. Completes all course management requirements to meet programdeadlinesPrepares and delivers course contentMonitors student progress; gives feedback as appropriateFacilitates student participation in learning activitiesServes as student-to-university liaison Reports student outcomes and uses this information for teachingand learning improvements Teaching Delivery/Learning Facilitation Skills – Managessmall, large, blended, hybrid and/or online classrooms, monitoringand ensuring participation, managing one’s own and students’ timeand attention effectively. The mission of The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciencesis the development of professional health care practitionersthrough innovation, individualized, and quality classroom,clinical, and distance education. GENERAL SUMMARYA contributing faculty member at the University of St. Augustinefor Health Sciences (USAHS) provides engaging clinically-focusedlearning opportunities for students in the health scienceprofessions, through face-to-face, blended, and/or online deliverymethods.ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIESMaintains expertise in content areaPromotes student success through optimal studentengagement Experience with distance learning preferred.Terminal degree preferred. Post- professional master’sdegree or clinical doctorate with demonstrated clinical expertisewith plans to obtain a terminal degree will beconsideredPrior teaching experience preferred [could includeonline]Experience in scholarly activity preferredA minimum of 3 years of clinical experience in the area ofcourse content requiredWorking knowledge of educational theory andmethodology Teaching Delivery/Learning Facilitation Skills : Managessmall, large, blended, hybrid, and/or online classrooms, monitoringand ensuring participation, managing one’s own and students’ timeand attention effectively.Academic Discipline Expertise : Has sufficient credentials,industry expertise, and/or experience in the discipline to eachaccording to the standards and qualifications required. Technical Committed to Mission and Values : Has a clear understandingof institution’s mission and values. Has a passion for facilitatinglearning and for enabling students to navigate their own learningjourney. LICENSURE and/or CERTIFICATIONFaculty Members must be appropriately credentialed, possess anearned degree from an accredited institution or recognized by acountry’s ministry of education in the discipline being taught, andbe licensed or license-eligible in order to teach in specificprograms.BUSINESS COMPETENCIES Contribute Knowledge to the Discipline – Compelled by theopportunity to contribute through research, scholarshipprofessional practice or creativity.center_img Communicates Effectively – Adapts oral and writtencommunication approach and style to the audience and based on themessage. Also listens attentively to others. Drives Engagement – Makes students feel welcome, understoodand valued. Creates a learning environment that is compelling,challenging and productive. Assesses student performance onpapers/examinations/projectsCommunicates with program director (and course coordinator ifteaching a multi-section course) regarding student difficulties orissues that ariseEnsures consistent content and testing, if a multi-sectioncourseCompletes annual self-evaluation of teaching performance; setsgoals for improvement Academic Discipline Expertise – Has sufficient credentials,industry expertise and/or experience in the discipline to teachaccording to the standards and qualifications required. Committed to Mission and Values – Has a clear understandingof institution’s mission and values. Has a passion for facilitatinglearning and for enabling students to navigate their own learningjourney. EDUCATION and/or EXPERIENCE Education Design – Designs learning experiences closelylinked to learning outcomes including lesson planning, design ofproject, work integrated, group learning experiences, orinteractive learning objects. Has depth of expertise in pedagogy,andragogy and overall learning effectiveness. Operational Communicates Effectively : Adapts oral and writtencommunication approach and style to the audience and based on themessage.Drives Engagement : Makes students feel welcomed,understood, and valued. Creates a learning environment that iscompelling, challenging, and productive. Accountable -Takes personal responsibility for own goals andoutcomes to ensure student success. Establishes clear expectations,follows through on commitments to students and holds themaccountable for assignments and performance Keeps course content current and as necessary, aligned withcourse consistency policy WORK ENVIRONMENTWork is performed primarily in a standard office environment butmay involve exposure to moderate noise levels. Work involvesoperation of personal computer equipment for six to eight hoursdaily and includes physical demands associated with a traditionaloffice setting, e.g., walking, standing, communicating, and otherphysical functions as necessary.The University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences is an equalopportunity at will employer and does not discriminate against anyemployee or applicant for employment because of age, race,religion, color, disability, sex, sexual orientation or nationalorigin.last_img read more

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Assistant/Associate Professor

first_imgMultiple Faculty PositionsGrado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, VirginiaTechThe Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) atVirginia Tech invites applications for multipletenured/tenure-track faculty positions at the rank of Assistant orAssociate Professor, effective August 2021. We seek outstandingcandidates for two positions: Stochastic Operations Research (witha focus on health systems and policy, healthcare analytics,healthcare operations, and/or medical decision making) andIntelligent Manufacturing (with a focus on digital manufacturing,Industrial Internet of Things, cyber-physical systems, and/orautomation/robotics).The ISE Department has 36 full-time instructional faculty, 30 ofwhom are tenured/tenure-track. Four are recent early investigatorrecipients, and numerous other faculty have received internationalor national recognition. Academic programs and research in thedepartment encompass Human Factors and Ergonomics, Manufacturing,Management and Systems Engineering, and Operations Research.Candidates will thus have the opportunity to work with a broadrange of departmental faculty, as well as with faculty in manyother colleges, centers, and institutes at Virginia Tech. Thedepartment is home to approximately 630 undergraduate students, 70master’s students, and 100 doctoral students. The undergraduate andgraduate ISE programs are currently ranked fourth and sixth,respectively, by U.S. News & World Report. Additionalinformation is available at: www.ise.vt.edu .Virginia Tech is a public land-grant university, committed toteaching and learning, research, and outreach to the Commonwealthof Virginia, the nation, and the world. Building on its motto of UtProsim (that I may serve), Virginia Tech is dedicated toInclusiveVT – serving in the spirit of community, diversity, andexcellence. Virginia Tech actively seeks a broad spectrum ofcandidates to join our community in preparing leaders for theworld. The College of Engineering undergraduate program ranks 13thand the graduate program ranks 31st among all U.S. engineeringschools (USN&WR). The mission of the College of Engineering isto educate and inspire our students to be critical thinkers,innovators, and leaders. Our core values are inclusiveness,excellence, integrity, perseverance, and stewardship.Virginia Tech’s main campus is located in Blacksburg, Virginia, inan area consistently ranked among the country’s best places tolive. In addition, our programs in the Washington, D.C., area offerunique proximity to government and industry partners and is alsoexpanding rapidly, with Virginia Tech’s exciting new InnovationCampus in Alexandria, Virginia, slated to open in 2024.Candidates are expected to lead innovative scholarship andresearch, develop and sustain an externally-funded researchprogram, teach and mentor undergraduate and graduate students, andserve the university and the profession. The positions require aPh.D. in industrial and systems engineering, operations research,or a closely related field.Applicants must apply online at jobs.vt.edu (posting number 514830). Applicationmaterials include a cover letter; CV; research statement; teachingstatement; statement on contributions to advancing diversity,equity, and inclusion; three relevant research publications; andcontact information for at least three references. Review ofapplications will commence January 29, 2021 and continue until theposition is filled. Questions regarding the positions should bedirected to the Search Committee at [email protected] .The department fully embraces Virginia Tech’s commitment toincrease faculty, staff, and student diversity; to ensure awelcoming, affirming, safe, and accessible campus climate; toadvance our research, teaching, and service mission throughinclusive excellence; and to promote sustainable transformationthrough institutionalized structures. If you are an individual witha disability and need an accommodation for the interview process,please contact Rhonda Hawley at [email protected] or 540-231-6656.Advertised: January 12, 2021Applications close:last_img read more

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Press release: Highways England boosting local economy with multi-million pound upgrade of M1

first_imgHighways England project sponsor, Tabatha Bailey, said: an upgrade of junctions 13 to 16 to four lanes running with no hard shoulder to increase capacity 38 new emergency areas (EAs) and emergency roadside telephones will be installed at emergency areas provision of new superspan gantries to support variable mandatory speed Limits and driver information the hardening of the central reserve and installation of a rigid concrete barrier (RCB) between J13-15 to help prevent vehicle cross-overs from opposite sides of the carriageway This is vital work to improve journeys through a busy stretch of the M1 and once complete, will boost the local economy by increasing capacity and supporting future housing development. It will provide a continuous smart motorway from the M25 all the way to junction 19 at Catthorpe. This means that a key arterial route in England will offer increased capacity and more reliable journeys for the hundreds of thousands of people that use the M1 every day. To make journeys more reliable, motorists using that stretch of road will be given real-time traffic information using the latest technology which will allow them to plan more efficiently. Narrow lanes will be in place for the duration of the work with a speed limit of 50mph in place to ensure the safety of motorists and the workforce.General enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. The section of M1 between junctions 13 and 16 is nearly 23 miles in length, passing through Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire and provides connections to the towns of Bedford, Milton Keynes and Northampton.It is also a key route for traffic travelling north and south and will see some 60 miles of smart motorway connecting the south of England at the M25 all the way to Catthorpe (Leicestershire) at junction 19.Work officially starts on the scheme on 8 August and once completed, some £959m of benefits for the local area will be delivered by boosting productivity with less congestion and more reliable journeys.It will also provide added-lane capacity on the motorway to support the development of new houses.In Northamptonshire some 18,870 new homes are due to built from 2011 to 2029. In Milton Keynes before 2031, the council proposes to build 26,500 new homes.Motorists travelling through the area currently suffer from congestion with daily traffic volumes around 116,000 vehicles per day on each section, with that number shooting up to more than 140,000 vehicles per day on a Friday.In amongst that mix, heavy goods vehicles include between 16 and 21% of the total traffic flow.Once complete, the work will see:last_img read more

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Uncovering history, via shovel

first_imgThe skies above the white tent in Harvard Yard were overcast. The roped-off area near Matthews Hall marked another year in search of history.Staff accompanied students who were joined by Native American community leaders, each bringing a unique perspective to the 10th annual Yard dig. All in attendance were focused on filling in the history of Harvard’s Indian College, established in 1665 with the mission of educating Native American students alongside Puritan students. Having the opportunity to be present at the 2014 Yard dig, I could not help but imagine what life must have been like for a native student in the 1600s.The teaching fellow held up a bag of artifacts unearthed at the 2013 dig, explaining their importance and their collective role in piecing together the story of the Indian College. He passed around a few objects, examples of what could be found in this year’s dig, and explained how each piece was significant.The tiny piece of metal type I held in my hand could be a link between Harvard’s Native American college in 1655 and present-day life in the Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP) and the community as a whole. The first Holy Bible translated into the language of the Massachusett Indians was printed here, and this piece of type may have helped produce a piece of history. The pieces of brick being passed around to students and faculty may have been part of the original Native American college, of which key elements were uncovered in the 2009 Yard dig.Matthew DeShaw (left): “To think that I am part of this history is nothing short of remarkable.”Built in 1655, the first brick building in the Yard, the college was erected to educate native youth free of charge. The evolution of Native American education at Harvard is a long one, and not without historical gaps. Much is left to learn about the struggles faced by early native students, as well as the college’s journey from the original charter to its present-day goals of preserving native cultures and embracing their varied histories.To think that I am part of this history is nothing short of remarkable. As I stand in the trench, watching the sifters go through shovels of dirt, I am literally following in the footsteps of all indigenous people at Harvard. When I consider the significance of not only the dig, but of elucidating the actual history of the Indian College, I become aware of how far native education at Harvard has come. It started with the desire to teach students Greek, Hebrew, and religion, but has grown and developed into a program that nurtures each native student’s culture and language, celebrating their history within a larger cultural context. Embracing issues within the native communities and bringing them to the forefront on campus has become HUNAP’s hallmark, changing the face of native education.Observing the dig’s progress led me to a newfound respect for archeologists and historians. Progress is slow and deliberate, every inch of earth charted, excavated, and examined with painstaking precision. It felt extraordinary to be a small part of historical advancement, one that features dirty hands and sore muscles. But what is even more exciting is how Native American history at Harvard College has developed into an example of preserving the past, educating in the present, and preparing for the future.I cannot help but appreciate the struggles and triumphs of generations of indigenous students before me. To appreciate their history is to recognize their contribution in hopes of ultimately making my own. Watching the Yard dig unfold allowed me to witness the front lines of academia. The sifters hummed, kicking out shovel after shovel of excavated material. A crowd assembled around the receptacle containing potential finds. Among the artifacts, I saw a few pieces of coal, aggregates of rock, shards of glass, and an MBTA token. In the age of Charlie cards, even that is an artifact now.Matthew DeShaw ’18 is a member of HUNAP. He will write an occasional column about his student experiences.last_img read more

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Lewis named Harvard Commencement speaker

first_imgBy 1963, Lewis was chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the historic March on Washington; he was the event’s youngest keynote speaker and is the only one still living. During Freedom Summer in 1964, he took part in voter registration drives in Mississippi. In March 1965, Lewis and fellow Civil Rights activist Hosea Williams led more than 600 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., where they were caught in a violent maelstrom of tear gas, lunging police dogs, club-wielding onlookers, and punishing fire hoses turned on full blast. Lewis was left with a fractured skull, and the event, broadcast nationwide, hastened the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.In 1977, President Jimmy Carter’s White House called on Lewis to direct ACTION, a federal volunteer agency. In 1981, he entered political life as a member of the Atlanta City Council, and five years later was elected to Congress, representing Atlanta and outlying areas. He is senior chief deputy whip for the Democratic Party in the House, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, a member of its Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support, and ranking member of its Subcommittee on Oversight.A graduate of both Fisk University and the American Baptist Theological Seminary, Lewis holds more than 50 honorary degrees from universities including Columbia, Duke, Howard, and Princeton.Lewis, who as a boy was denied a library card because of his race, is the author of several books. His trilogy “MARCH,” a graphic novel memoir written with Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell, was a best-seller and won the National Book Award. The “MARCH” trilogy has been adopted into the core curricula of school systems across the country to teach the Civil Rights Movement, and has been selected as a first-year reading text at a variety of colleges and universities.Lewis is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Lincoln Medal, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the only John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for Lifetime Achievement ever granted by the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation. Last year, the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School honored Lewis with the Gleitsman Citizen Activist Award for his 60-year career of advancing human rights.“John Lewis has dedicated his life to making the United States a more just and equitable society,” said Susan Morris Novick ’85, president of the Harvard Alumni Association. “I am sure that his courage, his compassion, and his commitment to service will inspire Harvard alumni and students alike.”As the principal speaker at the Afternoon Program on Commencement Day, Lewis will address the annual meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association, held in Harvard Yard’s Tercentenary Theatre between Widener Library and the Memorial Church.For a full schedule of Commencement Week events, visit the Commencement Office website. Congressman John Lewis, a Civil Rights leader who has represented Georgia’s 5th District for more than 30 years, will be the principal speaker at the Afternoon Program of Harvard’s 367th Commencement on May 24.“For more than 50 years, John Lewis has dedicated himself to the ideals of equality and decency, standing up for what is right, even when it meant putting himself in harm’s way,” Harvard President Drew Faust said. “His public service legacy is unparalleled, and he is an inspiration to me and to countless other people across the United States and around the world.“As president of Harvard, I have been fortunate to welcome Rep. Lewis to campus on several occasions, most memorably in 2012 when he was awarded an honorary degree and in 2016 when he joined me in dedicating a plaque on Wadsworth House in honor of four enslaved persons who lived there in the 1700s. I look forward to hearing his message at Commencement.”Lewis, who was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree from Harvard in 2012, was born to Alabama sharecroppers in 1940 and raised in the Jim Crow South. As a teenager, inspired by the activism of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the words of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the radio, he decided to join the Civil Rights Movement. As a student at Fisk University, he organized sit-in demonstrations at segregated lunch counters in Nashville, Tenn. In 1961 he joined the Freedom Riders, protesting segregation by occupying bus seats reserved for whites in the South. The buses were routinely attacked by armed, angry mobs, and that summer Lewis was arrested and beaten — the first of many arrests, beatings, imprisonments, and severe injuries that he sustained during the Civil Rights era. “John Lewis has dedicated his life to making the United States a more just and equitable society. I am sure that his courage, his compassion, and his commitment to service will inspire Harvard alumni and students alike.” — Susan Morris Novick ’85, Harvard Alumni Association presidentlast_img read more

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Virus and Georgia Wheat

first_imgGeorgia wheat farmers figure to get some of the best prices ever for this year’s crop.That makes their losses to a viral disease even harder to take.”We can find barley yellow dwarf virus in just about every wheat field across thestate at some level,” said Randy Hudson, an entomologist with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service. “Fortunately, not all the fields have the same level ofdamage.”Hudson and Dewey Lee, an Extension feed grains agronomist, figure losses will approach$8 million, depending on the weather in the final days before harvest, which starts inlate May.Georgia’s wheat harvest is divided fairly evenly between the part milled for flour andthe grain exported as livestock feed.Farmers’ reduced yields won’t affect the price of your flour or bread because Georgiagrows such a tiny part of the world market. But they’ll take a bite out of an otherwisehealthy boost to the state’s rural economy.Hudson said earliest-planted wheat in east-central Georgia shows the most dramaticsymptoms of the disease. But it’s in other areas, too.”We’veseen losses of more than 50 percent in specific fields in east Georgia,” he said.Other fields may show disease symptoms but not lose much of their wheat.Boyd Padgett, an Extension plant pathologist, said he’s seen the disease in nearlyevery wheat variety grown in Georgia. “Some may be less susceptible, but that’s not immunity,” hesaid.Farmers planted wheat on about 400,000 acres in more than two-thirds of Georgia’s counties this year.Extension economist George Shumaker said low world grain supplies have driven up pricesfor wheat and other small grains.Farmers have seen prices in the $6-per-bushel range for the July 1996 crop. That’s nearly double last year’s$3.50 wheat.This virus relies on aphids to travel from plant to plant and from one field toanother. Partly because they’re so small, aphids are hard to control.Hudson is working with David Buntin, a research entomologist, to control aphids inGeorgia and the Southeast. But barring aphid control, he said, farmers can’t do anything to preventinfection or help infected plants.”A virus causes barley yellow dwarf,” he said. Plant viruses act like mostviruses in humans. You can’t prevent them or cure them.”Farmers need to know this is out there,” Padgett said. “But going outand spraying fungicides for barley yellow dwarf is a waste of time and money.” The disease slows the flow of nutrients from leaves to the forming grain head. As aresult, less grain is harvested. Hudson said the plant makes lower-quality grain, too.Even with the disease problem, this year has been very good for wheat farmers.”The crop condition is good,” Shumaker said. “And farmers who have takenadvantage of the high prices are looking at a very profitable year.”So what can farmers do?Very little besides preparing for next year. “Once they’re aware of theproblem,” Hudson said, “they need to manage their next crop with barley yellowdwarf in mind.”Experts hope ongoing research can provide controls for barley yellow dwarf. Field testsshow that in-furrow insecticide treatments may help control the aphids that carry thevirus.”That could help us,” Hudson said. “But until then, we’ll just grin and bear it. Atleast the wheat Georgia farmers do make is valuable.”last_img read more

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Good Governance: age is a board diversity issue

first_imgThe more ages represented on your board, the more perspectives you can hear at your meeting and more.by: Les Wallace, Ph.D.I serve on two international boards and would be considered a “senior” member of each in both age and experience. I believe my experience is important; I’m not certain the age is. I know I’ve lived long enough to get a whopping lot of experience under my leadership belt. But I also know I’m recruiting and encouraging younger people to step up to governance leadership who, despite fewer years of experience, have loads of competencies and seasoning.While the credit union movement is in active discussion about the need to reach out to young people to become members, the governance discussion in both credit unions and the private sector is about reducing the average age of a board. Suddenly age becomes a diversity issue.Diversity grew up in an era of respecting differences and viewpoints along the dimensions of race, ethnicity and gender. It has since matured more broadly to include sexual orientation, socio-economic status, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, other ideologies and age. While many still see diversity as an equal rights issue, most leadership approaches see it as an intellectual capital issue: The greater the number of perspectives that can be brought to bear on the success of an enterprise, the better.Why should a broad age mix be important for your board? Let’s consider just a few reasons. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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