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Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) 2006 Annual Report

first_imgWilldale Limited (WILD.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2006 annual report.For more information about Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Willdale Limited (WILD.zw)  2006 annual report.Company ProfileWilldale Limited manufactures and markets a range of clay brick products for the Zimbabwe building and construction sector. Its clay brick range includes face brick, semi-face brick, common brick and paving bricks for walkways, patios, swimming pool surrounds and garden landscaping. The bricks are either manufactured with a rustic, smooth or brushed finish. Willdale Limited has a range which includes economy plaster, special ground solutions and decorative building products which include window sills, faggots and klompies. The company was listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange in 2003 after a demerger from Mashonaland Holdings Limited and is the only brick company listed on the ZSE. Willdale Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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The TUI share price is falling. Here’s what I’m doing

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge The TUI share price is falling. Here’s what I’m doing Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Roland Headcenter_img Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Roland Head | Monday, 29th March, 2021 | More on: TUI Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. The TUI (LSE: TUI) share price has fallen by more than 20% in a month, as fears grow that Covid-19 travel restrictions will last through the summer.However, TUI shares are still up 55% on over the last year. Investors who bought the stock as markets crashed last March have done well. Conventional market wisdom says investors should run their winners, but is TUI still cheap enough for me to buy? I’m not so sure.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Why I like TUITUI’s share price is still 40% below January 2020 levels. For that money I can get exposure to Europe’s largest travel company. TUI operates in all of Europe’s most popular holiday markets, so I think it should benefit immediately when demand starts to return.History suggests to me that sunseekers in Northern European countries such as the UK and Germany will get tired of staycationing. They’ll want to get back to places where the sun’s a bit more reliable.I’m confident that holiday demand will return to normal after the pandemic. In February, TUI said it was planning to operate at 80% of 2019 capacity this summer. I think that might be a little optimistic, but I’m sure we’ll see holiday activity return to normal in 2022.This is what worries meI can see two main problems with buying TUI shares as a Covid-19 recovery play. The first is that TUI’s sprawling empire of hotels, airlines and cruise ships means its operating expenses are quite high. In 2019, the company’s reported revenue of €18,900m, but its operating profit was just €769m. That’s an operating profit margin of only 4%.If TUI’s assets are open but less busy than usual, then profit margins could be even lower, despite cutting costs.My second worry is debt. TUI has borrowed a lot of extra money to get through the pandemic. The group’s net debt rose from €5.1bn at the end of 2019 to €7.2bn at the end of 2020.Over the same time, TUI’s share price drop means that its market-cap — the value of all its shares — has fallen from around €5.8bn to €3.9bn.One common way to value a business is to add together its net debt and market-cap. This is known as enterprise value. It shows the total cost of the company for a potential buyer. My sums tell me that TUI’s enterprise value is almost the same today as it was at the end of 2019.TUI share price: I’m staying awayIn my opinion, the risks facing TUI’s business today are bigger than they were at the end of 2019. To invest, I’d want to have a margin of safety in case of further problems.I don’t think TUI’s share price is low enough to provide that kind of protection. With travel restrictions likely to stay in place across Europe for some time yet, I reckon TUI looks fully-priced.I’ll take another look later this year but, for now, I’m staying away. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free.last_img read more

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BBC secures Six Nations contract to 2017

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Philip Bernie (L) and John FeehanThe RBS 6 Nations championship will be broadcast on the BBC up to and including the 2017 tournament, following a new deal announced today by BBC Sport and the Six Nations Council. The new deal extends BBC Sport’s current contract, as exclusive live broadcaster of the Six Nations, which runs until 2013 and covers TV, radio and online.This year’s tournament saw audiences increase to their highest level for 13 years, with an average audience of 4.7m per match. This continued the trend of year on year growth and in total over 30m people within the British Isles watched some of this year’s tournament. BBC Director of Sport, Barabara Slater said: “ The Six Nations is a crown jewel in the sporting calendar and we’re delighted that we can continue to bring the tournament to our audiences. Viewing figures continue to grow year on year and we look forward to continuing to work in partnership with the Six Nations to build interest even further through the BBC’s unparalleled offering of TV, radio, online and interactive services.”John Feehan, Chief Executive of the RBS 6Nations said: ‘We are delighted that BBC Sport will maintain, extend and enhance its coverage of the RBS 6 Nations, the world’s biggest annual rugby tournament, for a further four years to March 2017. The RBS 6 Nations is a major sporting event combining traditional rugby values with modern means of fans’ support, this could not be possible without the support of BBC Sport, RBS and our other partners and broadcasters,’”last_img read more

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Fresh setback for Asia Bibi as Supreme Court appeal delayed

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Asia Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Asia Bibi, the Christian woman on death row in Pakistan after being convicted of blasphemy in a row over drinking water, will have to wait for her Supreme Court appeal after a hearing due to take place Oct. 13 was adjourned. Justice Iqbal Hameed-ur-Rehman, one of the panel of three judges due to hear the appeal, recused himself saying that there was a conflict of interest.Full article. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Fresh setback for Asia Bibi as Supreme Court appeal delayed In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Gavin DrakePosted Oct 13, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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Episcopal food ministries help neighbors give thanks more than a…

first_img Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Amy SowderPosted Nov 22, 2017 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL center_img Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Episcopal food ministries help neighbors give thanks more than a month after deadly Northern California wildfires In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ United Thank Offering Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Charles Johnston says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Volunteers Alicia Wu and Emily Liu, high school sophomores from Los Altos, California, spend Nov. 18 planting organic fava bean seeds in the burned-over vineyards owned by St. Luke’s Episcopal Church member Charles Johnston of Helena View Johnston Vineyards in Napa Valley, California. The October fires killed more than 40 people and destroyed about 245,000 acres in Northern California. Photo: Charles Johnston[Episcopal News Service] Emma Green was scrolling through her Facebook news feed about 9:30 p.m. in early October when she first learned about the Northern California fires in Napa, Sonoma and Solano counties. Throughout that harrowing first night, she and her fellow volunteers connected about 2,000 people requesting help to those asking how to help.Green is poised to provide efficient aid like few people are – all because she’s the Community Meal Program coordinator at the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany in Vacaville, a town in Solano County. With fewer than 100 members, her church is small but the community program is mighty.“Because we feed the homeless on a regular basis, we already have that network of contacts in place. If a caterer makes food, with one text we can have that in 20 minutes,” Green told Episcopal News Service. “Our network for our little meal program was what kicked in that first night, that first 24 hours,” Green said. “I was so proud of our little church.”You’d think Thanksgiving, a holiday to celebrate God’s gifts of abundance, might be hard this year for these fire victims and volunteers. When it comes to food and drink, many Episcopalians in the fire-ravaged area lost so much, yet they gained community support they never expected. Not to minimize the traumatic disaster that took more than 40 lives and ravaged 245,000 acres, but the galvanizing of volunteers and donations since then has touched the hearts of many.Green’s church will have a Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 24 for its regularly scheduled Friday night hot meal for the needy. On Nov. 21, the regular Tuesday soup night, they had pumpkin cream soup with stuffing and pumpkin pie.At St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Calistoga, there was an interfaith Community Thanksgiving Service with drinks and dessert two nights before Thanksgiving, to hear about people’s experiences through this ordeal. The Rev. Susan Napoliello, deacon at St. Luke’s, also attended a Thanksgiving feast the Saturday before the holiday, hosted by the Napa Interfaith Council.Episcopalians joined members of other faith communities for an early Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 18 sponsored by the Napa Interfaith Council. Photo: The Rev. Susan NapolielloWhether they’re victims, volunteers or both, many are finding gratitude and focusing on Christ’s all-encompassing love this Thanksgiving weekend.“We have to look at our blessings. You ask God for a directive and are inspired. You recognize the broadness of what you’re doing and move forward,” Charles Johnston told ENS. “I am fortunate. I have the ability to recover.”A member of St. Luke’s, Johnston has been a wine grower and maker for 26 years before the fires destroyed his home and organic vineyards at Helena View Johnston Vineyards in Napa Valley.The wildfires that raged in Northern California in October destroyed lives and billions of dollars in property, including Charles Johnston’s Helena View Johnston Vineyards in Napa Valley. Photo courtesy of Charles JohnstonHe also lost 30,000 bottles of red wine and 12,000 gallons of wine in barrels. Although Johnston has a separate home in the city of Calistoga, he, his wife and his youngest daughter had moved all their belongings into the vineyard home. After the fires, he had two pairs of pants and one pair of shoes, all that was left back at his Calistoga home.The Diocese of Northern California gave him two $250 checks for Daisy, his 6-year-old daughter, to replenish her Roman Catholic school uniforms. “That’s amazing,” Johnston said, his voice cracking. “I’ve been on the donor end most of my life. For us, we’re the victims this time. It makes me cry.”Johnston sees signs everywhere of community and regeneration.More than a month after the fires, several high school students from Los Altos in the Bay Area arrived at his vineyard to reseed his land with 30 pounds of organic fava beans. They’ll come back next spring to pick them and take them home.Johnston, a delegate to the 2017 Northern California Diocesan Convention, made it to the gathering just days after the fires and shared how this experience has changed his spiritual perspective.“God has given me the pleasure of having nothing to deal with that’s material. All the letters, personal things, every single photograph – everything is gone. I look to my spiritual roots and say well, maybe there is something bigger than this that I’m supposed to do,” Johnston explained for ENS. “It takes heart to make this happen, how we all come together for a common cause. It wakes up our minds.”Emily Liu and Alicia Wu, high school volunteers from Los Altos, California, help vineyard owner Charles Johnston Nov. 18, with organic reseeding as a way to control erosion and nitrogen enrichment. It’s one example of how communities unite to help in food efforts after the Northern California fires. Photo courtesy of Charles JohnstonPeople are helping each other all sorts of ways with food.Lori Korleski Richardson, interim communications director for the Diocese of Northern California, said the community-supported agriculture group to which she belongs, Farm Fresh to You, has been asking its members to buy an extra box to be donated through the Redwood Empire Food Bank in Sonoma. The food bank then donates another box to double the food going to fire victims. St. Andrew’s Mission in Monte Rio is one of the food bank’s partners. Located about 10 miles west of Santa Rosa, the mission’s food program provides groceries and hot meals to people in need. While that immediate area was affected mainly by smoke, many fire evacuees found temporary housing in the area and were served by St. Andrew’s worship and food pantry, said Leslie Benjamin, a lay leader in that worship community.The Rev. Josephine “Phina” Borgeson, a non-parochial deacon of the Diocese of Northern California and food ministry networker from the Russian River Deanery, told a Nov. 18 gathering at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Healdsburg: “Food ministry is my thing. With this fire, this urban fire, there is so much that is unknown. What’s happening to our crops? I contacted the cooperative extension and UC Davis, and they said they had no research on toxins that are released during urban fires. Well, they should have plenty to work with soon; we’ve been doing lots of sampling in our watershed.”Borgeson added in an interview with ENS that there is a sense that heroic crisis efforts did not always jibe with existing food-recovery efforts, such as gleaning and food rescue, as well as they might have. The Sonoma County Food Recovery Coalition has been working on an online directory to ensure that produce and other food donations find a good home in ordinary times.“We hope we can make it even better by learning what worked in the recent crisis,” Borgeson told ENS in an email.In the Interfaith Sustainable Food Collaborative October newsletter, founder Steve Schwartz wrote that the Sebastopol, California, organization’s mission is to work for food access, justice and sustainability, not necessarily emergency hunger relief. Yet, he wrote, “some of the same ‘infrastructure’ such as coolers, refrigerators, storage bins and shelving that are key during an emergency also position a congregation to do more with gleaning, greening the pantry with fresh vegetables and other food access projects during more normal times.”Episcopal Community Services supports the development of community gardens, food pantries and feeding programs with mentoring, information-sharing and start-up grants, the Rev. Lucretia Jevne, president of the board of directors, told ENS by email.Volunteers with the Community Meal Program at the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany in Vacaville, California, prep for one of two weekly meals offered at the little church. Photo: Church of the Epiphany Community ResponseOne of those feeding programs is Green’s Community Meal Program at Church of the Epiphany in Vacaville, which received a United Thank Offering grant and is a Jubilee Ministry Center. “This group stepped up at the time of the fires by providing meals and supplies to various shelters,” Jevne said.Green and her fellow volunteers coordinated the delivery of tents to those who lost their homes that first night. She started tearing up as she recalled the choking smoke, the cats whose ears and whiskers had burned off, and the traumatized horses they fed and watered at the dilapidated stalls at Dixon May Fair, an evacuation site.“It was one road away from burning the north end of our town. It was really scary,” Green said.In a normal week, Green’s church kitchen prepares about 350 meals for the needy in the community. To accomplish this service, Green has a network of other Episcopal churches and churches of other religions, corporate food companies, local bakeries, and social services and government agencies. When the fires took over, that network enabled Green to quickly match the fire victims’ immediate needs with available resources.“In this environment, it’s not just cup of soup we hand you and say move along; we care about you. It’s where two or three are gathered, you know? It’s crazy how transforming that dynamic becomes when you just let go and let God,” Green said. “When everybody chips in and does something as a team, it’s amazing what you can do; it’s like the loaves and fishes concept.”The food has been aplenty.At Church of the Incarnation in Santa Rosa, the Rev. James Richardson, the priest-in-charge, said they are still serving their Open Table Sunday breakfast and haven’t seen an upswing in guests for that program because of the fires.Northern California residents came together to help each other during the late October wildfires. Even if those fires are out of the headlines, the need and the love continue. Photo: Church of the Epiphany Community Response“The food banks during the fires were turning away food donations because there was nowhere to put it,” Richardson told ENS. “We also have a CSA that delivers to people at the church, and the service has not been interrupted. We really don’t have a shortage of stuff.”The bigger issue at the moment is finding people rentals to live in and helping people pay their rents, Richardson said.The Ven. Gary Brown, archdeacon for diaconal ministries at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Grass Valley, said some of his parishioners were evacuated from their communities. His rural town is in the Sierra Nevada foothills east of the major fires, although two smaller ones threatened them. A former psychiatric nurse for 40 years, Brown visited deacons in the harder-hit areas a month after the fires and listened to their experiences and emotions. Some were concerned about undocumented workers getting food and other necessities without land to work on.“Just because the emergency is over, doesn’t mean it’s over for the people. It’s too easy to let that drop after the emergency services leave,” Brown said. “These folks have been very traumatized. What the church can do is provide people and places to listen to them. Just listen. Don’t ignore them.”Those living far away can give to Episcopal Relief & Development’s U.S. Disaster Fund or to the Diocese of Northern California, via the options here.“And pray,” Brown said. “There’s a lot of hurt and a lot of pain going on around here.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] Lori Korleski Richardson, interim communications director for the Diocese of Northern California, contributed to this story. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC November 26, 2017 at 5:51 pm A great big thank you to Amy Sowder for the accuracy and depth of her article on the Episcopal Ministries’ involvement in response to the recent Northern California Fires. The recovery effort continues in ernest! Northern California wildfires 2017, last_img read more

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Change your phone settings so Apple, Google can’t track your movements

first_img Please enter your comment! The Anatomy of Fear By Jen King, Stanford UniversityTechnology companies have been pummeled by revelations about how poorly they protect their customers’ personal information, including an in-depth New York Times report detailing the ability of smartphone apps to track users’ locations. Some companies, most notably Apple, have begun promoting the fact that they sell products and services that safeguard consumer privacy.Smartphone users are never asked explicitly if they want to be tracked every moment of each day. But cellular companies, smartphone makers, app developers and social media companies all claim they have users’ permission to conduct near-constant personal surveillance.The underlying problem is that most people don’t understand how tracking really works. The technology companies haven’t helped teach their customers about it, either. In fact, they’ve intentionally obscured important details to build a multi-billion-dollar data economy based on an ethically questionable notion of informed consent.How consumers are made to agreeMost companies disclose their data protection practices in a privacy policy; most software requires users to click a button saying they accept the terms before using the program.But people don’t always have a free choice. Instead, it’s a “take-it-or-leave-it” agreement, in which a customer can use the service only if they agree.Consumers often do not have a free choice when it comes to privacy agreements.Marta Design/Shutterstock.comAnyone who actually wants to understand what the policies say finds the details are buried in long legal documents unreadable by nearly everyone, perhaps except the lawyers who helped create them.Often, these policies will begin with a blanket statement like “your privacy is important to us.” However, the actual terms describe a different reality. It’s usually not too far-fetched to say that the company can basically do whatever it wants with your personal information, as long as it has informed you about it.U.S. federal law does not require that a company’s privacy policy actually protect users’ privacy. Nor are there any requirements that a company must inform consumers of its practices in clear, nonlegal language or provide consumers a notice in a user-friendly way.Theoretically, users might be able to vote with their feet and find similar services from a company with better data-privacy practices. But take-it-or-leave-it agreements for technologically advanced tools limit the power of competition across nearly the entire technology industry.Data sold to third partiesThere are a few situations where mobile platform companies like Apple and Google have let people exercise some control over data collection.For example, both companies’ mobile operating systems let users turn off location services, such as GPS tracking. Ideally, this should prevent most apps from collecting your location – but it doesn’t always. Further, it does nothing if your mobile provider resells your phone’s location information to third parties.App makers are also able to persuade users not to turn off location services, again with take-it-or-leave-it notifications. When managing privileges for iOS apps, users get to choose whether the app can access the phone’s location “always,” “while using the app” or “never.”But changing the setting can trigger a discouraging message: “We need your location information to improve your experience,” says one app. Users are not asked other important questions, like whether they approve of the app selling their location history to other companies.And many users don’t know that even when their name and contact information is removed from location data, even a modest location history can reveal their home addresses and the places they visit most, offering clues to their identities, medical conditions and personal relationships.Why people don’t opt outWebsites and apps make it difficult, and sometimes impossible, for most people to say no to aggressive surveillance and data collection practices. In my role as a scholar of human-computer interaction, one issue I study is the power of defaults.When companies set a default in a system, such as “location services set to on,” people are unlikely to change it, especially if they are unaware there are other options they could choose.Further, when it is inconvenient to change the location services, as is the case on both iOS and Android systems today, it’s even less likely that people will opt out of location collection – even when they dislike it.Companies’ take-it-or-leave-it privacy policies and default choices for users’ privacy settings have created an environment where people are unaware that their lives are being subjected to minute-by-minute surveillance.They’re also mostly not aware that information that could identify them individually is resold to create ever-more-targeted advertising. Yet the companies can legally, if not ethically, claim that everyone agreed to it.Overcoming the power of defaultsMonitor your phone’s default settings.Georgejmclittle/Shutterstock.comPrivacy researchers know that people dislike these practices, and that many would stop using these services if they understood the extent of the data collection. If invasive surveillance is the price of using free services, many would rather pay or at least see companies held to stronger data collection regulations.The companies know this too, which is why, I argue, they use a form of coercion to ensure participation.Until the U.S. has regulations that, at a minimum, require companies to ask for explicit consent, individuals will need to know how to protect their privacy. Here are my three suggestions:Start by learning how to turn off location services on your iPhone or Android device.Turn location on only when using an app that clearly needs location to function, such as a map.Avoid apps, such as Facebook Mobile, that dig deeply into your phone for as much personal information as possible; instead, use a browser with a private mode, like Firefox, instead.Don’t let default settings reveal more about you than you want.Jen King, Director of Consumer Privacy, Center for Internet and Society, Stanford UniversityThis article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSAppleGoogleThe Conversation Previous articleNew medical advances marking the end of a long reign for ‘diet wizards’Next articleLet’s Talk About It: The Groveland Four Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Stand Up To Cancer, Friday 19 October 2012

first_imgStand Up for Cancer originated in the USA.www.channel4.com/su2c Howard Lake | 13 October 2012 | News Tagged with: Events Individual giving  43 total views,  1 views today About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Stand Up To Cancer, Friday 19 October 2012  44 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis A promotional video for the first UK Stand Up for Cancer fundraising event, involving Channel 4 and Cancer Research UK.The video, which features people whose family members have been affected by cancer, and some who themselves have experienced it, invites viewers to make a text donation of £5 or £10. Singer Kylie Minogue says that donors’ money will “help change the odds” in overcoming cancer.The first of what will no doubt become annual Stand Up for Cancer events takes place on Friday 19 October 2012 from 7.30pm. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Deloitte selects 16 more Social Innovation Pioneers in

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Business advisory firm Deloitte LLP has announced the second group of organisations to benefit from its £1 million Social Innovation Pioneers programme.  The 16 new Pioneers are a range of social businesses who will work with the firm over the next 12 months to grow their business and social impact.Pioneers receive over £1 million worth of tailored in-kind support from senior advisers within the firm. This year they come from sectors including hospitality, healthcare, education, and consumer business, and they have revenues ranging from £16,000 to £3.8 milllion. One of the new Pioneers joining the scheme in the second wave is REDS10, a social enterprise that offers apprenticeship opportunities in construction across London.  The enterprise aims to help young people get qualified and employed in a specific trade. By working with Deloitte, it hopes to increase the sectors they can gain employment from and explore further work on social impact bonds to enable more youth employment. Advertisement Deloitte selects 16 more Social Innovation Pioneers in Howard Lake | 10 June 2013 | News First year of Social Innovation PioneersSince the Social Innovation Pioneers programme began in May 2012, 3,000 volunteer hours and 4,000 hours of pro-bono support have been delivered by Deloitte staff to the initial 30 Pioneers.  This included strategy support, financial modelling, corporate property advice, website development and impact measurement. One year on, Pioneers have reported an average growth in turnover of 45%, and 85% have increased employment.Bob Thust, Director for Responsible Business at Deloitte, said: “Our original 30 Social Innovation Pioneers will now join an alumni network, with many of our staff continuing to support them on a wide range of projects. Close to a third of the original businesses have developed joint ventures with the firm or entered our supply chain”.  11 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Emergency services attend serious road traffic incident in Dungloe

first_img Facebook Emergency services attend serious road traffic incident in Dungloe Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Stock photoEmergency services are at the scene of a Road Traffic incident in West Donegal.It is understood that at least one person has been injured in the incident which occurred near to St Crona’s National School earlier this evening.There are no further details at present. Google+ By News Highland – January 10, 2019 Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Previous articleDerry woman charged with aiding and abetting arson at Lenamore StablesNext articleWoman in her 30s dies in Dungloe Road Traffic Collision News Highland Pinterest Facebook Twitter Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic last_img read more

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Ammonium in coastal Antarctic aerosol and snow: Role of polar ocean and penguin emissions

first_imgYear-round aerosol samples collected in the boundary layer at coastal Antarctic sites (Dumont D’Urville, Neumayer, and Halley) indicate a seasonal cycle of ammonium concentrations with a minimum in winter (April–September). A large intersite difference appears in the summer (November–February) maxima values, from ∼12.5 ng m−3 at Neumayer to 140–230 ng m−3 at Dumont D’Urville. At Dumont D’Urville, ammonium concentrations are the largest ever reported from Antarctic sites, and the large summer maxima are associated with large enrichments with respect to sea salt for potassium and calcium. In addition, seasonal ammonium variations at Dumont D’Urville are in phase with a well-marked seasonal cycle of oxalate concentrations which exhibit maxima of 5–10 ng m−3 in spring and summer and minima of less than 0.5 ng m−3 in winter. Such a composition of aerosols present in the boundary layer at Dumont D’Urville in summer is linked to the presence of a large Adélie penguin population from the end of October to March at the site. Ornithogenic soils (defined as guano-enriched soils), together with the bacterial decomposition of uric acid, are a source of ammonium, oxalate, and cation (such as potassium and calcium) aerosol, in addition to a subsequent large ammonia loss from ornithogenic soils to the atmosphere. The total breeding population of 5 million Adélie penguins widely distributed around the Antarctic continent may emit, at most, some 2.5 × 10−4 Mt of NH3-N during the summer months. In contrast, Halley and Neumayer Stations are far less exposed to penguin colony emissions. At Neumayer, ammonium concentrations peak from January to March and are in phase with the increase of biogenic sulfur species. Here the NH4+/(MSA + nss SO4−) molar ratio is close to 13% in summer aerosol and to 40% in winter aerosol. Using this summer ratio, which may be related to ammonia and sulfur oceanic emissions occurring south of 50°S in summer and estimated DMS emissions in these regions at this time, we derive an upper limit of 0.064 Mt NH3-N emitted per year by the high-latitude Southern Ocean in summer. This study indicates a very limited ammonia neutralization of acidic sulfate aerosols at high southern latitudes, except in the vicinity of ornithogenic soils occupied by large penguin colonies.last_img read more

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