Home » Archive by category "oczyzuax"

Ammonium in coastal Antarctic aerosol and snow: Role of polar ocean and penguin emissions

first_imgYear-round aerosol samples collected in the boundary layer at coastal Antarctic sites (Dumont D’Urville, Neumayer, and Halley) indicate a seasonal cycle of ammonium concentrations with a minimum in winter (April–September). A large intersite difference appears in the summer (November–February) maxima values, from ∼12.5 ng m−3 at Neumayer to 140–230 ng m−3 at Dumont D’Urville. At Dumont D’Urville, ammonium concentrations are the largest ever reported from Antarctic sites, and the large summer maxima are associated with large enrichments with respect to sea salt for potassium and calcium. In addition, seasonal ammonium variations at Dumont D’Urville are in phase with a well-marked seasonal cycle of oxalate concentrations which exhibit maxima of 5–10 ng m−3 in spring and summer and minima of less than 0.5 ng m−3 in winter. Such a composition of aerosols present in the boundary layer at Dumont D’Urville in summer is linked to the presence of a large Adélie penguin population from the end of October to March at the site. Ornithogenic soils (defined as guano-enriched soils), together with the bacterial decomposition of uric acid, are a source of ammonium, oxalate, and cation (such as potassium and calcium) aerosol, in addition to a subsequent large ammonia loss from ornithogenic soils to the atmosphere. The total breeding population of 5 million Adélie penguins widely distributed around the Antarctic continent may emit, at most, some 2.5 × 10−4 Mt of NH3-N during the summer months. In contrast, Halley and Neumayer Stations are far less exposed to penguin colony emissions. At Neumayer, ammonium concentrations peak from January to March and are in phase with the increase of biogenic sulfur species. Here the NH4+/(MSA + nss SO4−) molar ratio is close to 13% in summer aerosol and to 40% in winter aerosol. Using this summer ratio, which may be related to ammonia and sulfur oceanic emissions occurring south of 50°S in summer and estimated DMS emissions in these regions at this time, we derive an upper limit of 0.064 Mt NH3-N emitted per year by the high-latitude Southern Ocean in summer. This study indicates a very limited ammonia neutralization of acidic sulfate aerosols at high southern latitudes, except in the vicinity of ornithogenic soils occupied by large penguin colonies.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Philippine Navy’s BRP Benguet to Ship Relief Goods to Zamboanga City

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy Philippine Navy’s BRP Benguet to Ship Relief Goods to Zamboanga City September 18, 2013 The BRP Benguet (LT-507), a Landing Ship Tank (LST) of the Philippine Navy will ferry relief goods intended for the affected residents of Zamboanga City.The Philippine Navy thru Civil Military Operation Group (CMOG) is now accepting relief goods coming from different agencies/individuals who are willing to donate to the area, severely affected in the on-going standoff against rogue elements of Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF).BRP Benguet will depart with the relief goods on September 20, 2013 from Naval Base Cavite to Zamboanga City.[mappress]Press Release, September 18, 2013; Image: Navy View post tag: Goods Back to overview,Home naval-today Philippine Navy’s BRP Benguet to Ship Relief Goods to Zamboanga City View post tag: Defence View post tag: City View post tag: Defensecenter_img View post tag: Philippine View post tag: Benguet View post tag: BRP View post tag: Naval View post tag: Relief View post tag: ship View post tag: Zamboanga Share this articlelast_img read more

Continue reading »

USA: CNP Visits Navy Expeditionary Combat Command

first_img View post tag: Expeditionary View post tag: Command View post tag: usa USA: CNP Visits Navy Expeditionary Combat Command Share this article October 25, 2013 View post tag: Combat Training & Education Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: CNP Visits Navy Expeditionary Combat Command View post tag: CNP The Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran visited Navy Expeditionary Combat Command (NECC), Oct. 23.CNP visited NECC to tour its facilities and familiarize himself with the Navy’s expeditionary forces and their capabilities.The tour showcased NECC’s assets and provided Moran with an opportunity to interact with the Sailors who make the expeditionary forces operational.“When you get out and see what Sailors are doing in the fleet, operating the gear that they have trained for, there’s a lot of pride, a lot of enthusiasm about what they do,” said Moran. “Sailors want us to know what capabilities they have and of course they want our support in Washington D.C. That’s why I came out to find out what NECC has, what they need and to make sure requirements are represented inside the Pentagon and elsewhere in Washington D.C.”Moran began his visit at Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 where he observed equipment demonstrations followed by a visit to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training and Evaluation Unit 2 (EODTEU 2).“The role of the expeditionary capabilities, I think, will be as important in the future as it has been in the last ten years,” said Moran. “They can go to places and participate in the kind of operations and training with friends and allies around multiple regions throughout the world that we want to stay connected to, and partner with many navies-small and large navies-around the globe which is very important for us.”After leaving EODTEU 2, the CNP traveled to Coastal Riverine Group Two Training and Evaluation Unit to view static displays and speak to Sailors from Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group, Navy Expeditionary Intelligence Command, Coastal Riverine Force, Expeditionary Combat Readiness Center, Maritime Civil Affairs and Security Training Command, and Naval Construction Force, followed by a final boat demonstration from Coastal Riverine Force.NECC Sailors were appreciative to be given the opportunity to have their voices heard.“It was great for our command and community as a whole because it allows our leadership to see what we are doing day-to-day, and the attention to detail that our work takes,” said Navy Diver 2nd Class Patrick Lane, assigned to MDSU 2.“Speaking with the CNP was needed, especially when you’re in an expeditionary community. A lot of people don’t know what our forces do,” said Chief Yeoman Chanreka Leftridge, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 12.Before departing the CNP thanked the NECC Sailors for their hard work and dedication to the expeditionary force.“This was a really good visit for me to see these Sailors doing extraordinary work throughout the Navy,” said Moran.NECC forces are globally deployed, providing capability across the full range of military operations in the maritime strategy to include forward presence, maritime security, humanitarian assistance and disaster response, sea control and power projection and deterrence.[mappress]Press Release, October 25, 2013; Image: Navy View post tag: visits View post tag: Navylast_img read more

Continue reading »

Professor of Practice – Livestock Judging Coach

first_imgPosting DetailsJob TitleProfessor of Practice – Livestock Judging CoachPosting NumberP0063FJob Description SummaryThe Department of Animal Sciences at Auburn University(www.auburn.edu) is seeking applications for the position ofProfessor of Practice – Livestock Judging Coach. The position istwelve-month, non-tenure track. The successful candidate will havea 100% instruction appointment. Instructional needs will be basedon current existing and future courses aimed at preparing livestockjudging teams and as well as other departmental instructional needsbased on the applicant’s area of expertise. The projected startdate is May 1 to July 1, 2021.Responsibilities: The individual will be expected to develop acompetitive, nationally recognized, instructional program focusedon livestock evaluation. The successful candidate will develop andmaintain recruitment strategies of transfer students, and on campusstudents for participation in nationally recognized judging andevaluation contests. The candidate will be expected to recruit andsupervise a graduate student Assistant Livestock Judging Coachutilizing a competitive graduate student stipend that is provided.The candidate will be expected to collaborate with existingfaculty, and staff in the College of Agriculture, AlabamaCooperative Extension System and stakeholders of the program. Thedevelopment of collaborative relationships with others across stateand regional boundaries as a national program is built andmaintained is expected. The successful candidate will be a memberof the Department of Animal Sciences faculty and contributeextensively to expansion of applied learning experiences.Minimum QualificationsMinimum qualifications include: 1) Masters or PhD in Animal Scienceor closely related field at the time employment begins; 2)experience with teaching livestock evaluation and selection as wellas carcass evaluation; 3) documented livestock coaching experienceat the collegiate level (junior and/or senior college); 4)demonstrated ability to teach college-level courses and/or tomentor undergraduate students. Candidates must possess strongwritten and oral communication skills. Appointees in the Professorof Practice series are distinguished professionals who havesignificant depth of practical experience, may be distinguished asleaders in a professional field and can better enable students andfaculty to succeed in their respective roles. The successfulcandidate must meet eligibility requirements for work in the UnitedStates at the time the appointment is scheduled to begin andcontinue working legally for the term of employment. Salary will becompetitive and commensurate with background and experience. Anattractive benefit package is available.Desired QualificationsSpecial Instructions to ApplicantsApplicants must apply for this position by visiting the link:http://www.auemployment.com/postings/20128 and attach thefollowing:1. Cover letter that addresses the experience pertinent to theposition’s responsibilities2. Current curriculum vita,3. Statement of competitive coaching accomplishments (Listingteams, individuals, and awards/placings) (upload into otherdocumentation)4. Statement of teaching philosophy5. Statement of coaching philosophy (upload into otherdocumentation (2))When prompted during the on-line process, please provide the names,email addresses and phone numbers for three (3) professionalreferences. Only completed application materials will beconsidered. To ensure consideration for the position, applicantsare encouraged to apply by January 1, 2021. The search may continueuntil the position is filled. Questions about this position shouldbe directed to Dr. Jason Sawyer, Search Committee Chair, Email:[email protected]; phone 254-485-2992Open DateClose DateOpen Until FilledYesReferences required for this position?YesIf yes, minimum number requested3Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Optional & Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover LetterCurriculum VitaeOther DocumentationStatement of Teaching PhilosophyOther Documentation (2)Optional DocumentsOther * Please enter the specifics of the option you selectedabove:(Open Ended Question)center_img * How did you hear about this employment opportunity?Advertisement/PublicationWebsitePublic Job Posting (auemployment.com site)Academic ConferenceAgency ReferralInternal Job PostingPersonal ReferralVeterans Assistance Services (Veteran Job Boards, Military BaseServices, State Vet Rep, etc.)Disability Assistance Services (Disability Job Boards, ABLENetwork, Voc-Rehab referral, etc.)Otherlast_img read more

Continue reading »

Umphrey’s McGee Shares Pro-Shot “Can’t You See” Video With Greensky’s Anders Beck & Paul Hoffman

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee just officially released a pro-shot video from their three-night run in Asheville last weekend. Umphrey’s certainly took advantage of the fact that Greensky Bluegrass was their opening act, with Anders Beck and Paul Hoffman of Greensky joining them on stage for multiple occasions throughout the weekend.This latest eight-minute video features Umphrey’s McGee, Beck, and Hoffman taking on “Can’t You See” as a first-set closer from their show on February 18th at the ExploreAsheville.com Arena. Check out the video for yourself below, courtesy of the band and TourGigs. [Cover photo: Phierce Photo]last_img read more

Continue reading »

Nile Rodgers Offers Free Concert Tickets To Federal Employees As Government Shutdown Continues

first_imgWith elected officials in Washington continuing their childish game of Government Shutdown, musicians are starting to make more of a conscious effort to help the everyday Americans who are dealing with the financial burden of the ongoing political pissing contest. CHIC‘s Nile Rodgers is now one of those artists looking to give his fans a break from their professional hardships, as the acclaimed songwriter is offering 600 tickets free of charge to furloughed government workers and their families or friends for his upcoming performance at MGM National Harbor in Oxon Hill, Maryland later this week on January 26th.According to a statement shared on his website on Tuesday, Rodgers is hoping that his upcoming concert invite will provide some much needed “good times” for a few of the 800,000 federal government workers around the country, who’s wallets are feeling the devastating effects of the shutdown.“Like many people, I’m frustrated by what’s happening and my heart goes out to these incredibly hard-working people who provide important service to our country, yet have had their lives, disrupted by circumstances, not of their doing,” Rodgers posted to his website. “As a two-time cancer survivor, I believe music has a tremendous power and this is a small gesture I can make to provide some joy and healing. In one of my biggest songs I wrote, “We Are Family, I’ve got all my sisters with me”, I consider all of these people to be my brothers and sisters and I hope this lets them know that we are 100% behind them.”Related: Yellowstone Audio Samples Keep National Parks’ Spirit Alive During Government ShutdownFans within the Oxon Hill, Maryland area who would like to take Rodgers up on his concert invite, should head over to his website and fill out the ticket request form. The first 300 applicants will receive a pair of tickets, but anyone interested in doing so should note that the name they’re registering with, should be the same one listed on their Government I.D., as it is required to pick up the tickets on-site at the event on Saturday.Rodgers and CHIC are set to spend their winter and spring 2019 months performing across the country alongside fellow 70’s pop star Cher on the singer’s Here We Go Again Tour. Last spring Rodgers was announced as the new Chief Creative Advisor for London’s historic Abbey Road Studios.last_img read more

Continue reading »

New member of Harvard Corporation

first_imgDavid M. Rubenstein, a noted figure in finance and philanthropy, founding chair of the University’s Global Advisory Council, a widely experienced trustee of educational and cultural institutions, and one of Harvard’s most engaged volunteer leaders, will become the newest member of the Harvard Corporation in July 2017.In accordance with the University’s charter, Rubenstein was elected today by the Corporation as a Fellow of Harvard College, with the consent of the Board of Overseers.Rubenstein’s “acumen in finance, his experience both in leading a complex organization and in serving as an institutional trustee, his capacious intellect and global outlook, his devotion to universities and to the arts and culture, and his capacity to inspire generosity in others all promise to serve the Corporation and the University well,” said President Drew Faust and William F. Lee, the Corporation’s senior fellow, in a statement announcing the appointment.Rubenstein, they added, “has served on a remarkable range of nonprofit boards reflecting his equally remarkable span of interests — in higher education, the arts, public policy, medicine, international affairs, and American history and culture.” At Harvard, they noted, he serves as the inaugural chair of the Global Advisory Council, an advisory group of alumni and friends from 25 countries; as one of the co-chairs of the ongoing Harvard Campaign; and as the “indefatigable” chair of the Campaign for Harvard Kennedy School.“Harvard is a truly unique global institution of higher learning and cutting-edge research, and I am humbled to be associated with such an institution in this way,” said Rubenstein. “I hope John Harvard would approve.”Rubenstein’s election follows the arrival on the Corporation in January 2016 of Shirley Tilghman, president emerita of Princeton University. Tilghman was elected after the sudden death last summer of James F. Rothenberg, a longtime member of the Corporation and former treasurer of the University, who had been expected to conclude his Corporation service at the end of June 2016. With Nannerl O. Keohane, president emerita of both Duke University and Wellesley College, planning to step down at the end of June 2017 after 12 years of Corporation service, Rubenstein will take up his duties then. In view of Rothenberg’s death last summer and Keohane’s anticipated departure in 2017, Faust and Lee said, “We are fortunate to be able to welcome — in Shirley Tilghman and, before long, in David Rubenstein — two such accomplished and collegial leaders to help guide the University forward.”Rubenstein is co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, a global alternative asset manager based in Washington, D.C., which he co-founded in 1987. The firm manages more than $170 billion in assets through 36 offices worldwide.A native of Baltimore, Rubenstein earned his bachelor’s degree from Duke University in 1970 and his law degree from the University of Chicago in 1973.After law school, he entered private legal practice, then served as chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments. He was deputy assistant to the president for domestic policy in the Carter administration from 1977 to 1981. Immediately before co-founding Carlyle, he practiced law with the firm then known as Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge.An experienced trustee of numerous nonprofit institutions, Rubenstein will step down as chair of the Duke University board of trustees on July 1, 2017, at the conclusion of his term. His array of other board engagements includes his work with the Brookings Institution, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and the University of Chicago, among other institutions. He is also president of the Economic Club of Washington.An avid supporter of cultural, historical, and educational initiatives, Rubenstein was an early champion of Bill Gates and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge. His own notable acts of philanthropy include support for the restoration of both the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial, for the National Archives’ continuing display of an original 1297 Magna Carta, for the Smithsonian Institution’s establishment of the National Museum of African American History, and for the panda habitat at the National Zoo.Rubenstein is married to Alice Rogoff, M.B.A. ’78. They have three grown children, two of them graduates of Harvard College. He has served on the Committee to Visit the Harvard Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and the Harvard Business School Board of Dean’s Advisors, in addition to his other Harvard roles.The President and Fellows of Harvard College, also known as the Harvard Corporation, is Harvard’s principal fiduciary governing board and the smaller of Harvard’s two boards, the other being the Board of Overseers.In addition to President Faust, the current Corporation members include Lawrence S. Bacow, J.D. ’76, M.P.P. ’76, Ph.D. ’78, president emeritus of Tufts University and leader-in-residence, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School of Government; James W. Breyer, M.B.A. ’87, founder and CEO of Breyer Capital; Kenneth I. Chenault, J.D. ’76, chairman and CEO, American Express Co.; Paul J. Finnegan (treasurer) ’75, M.B.A. ’82, co-CEO, Madison Dearborn Partners; Susan L. Graham ’64, Pehong Chen Distinguished Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley; Nannerl O. Keohane, LL.D. ’93 (hon.), president emerita of Duke University and Wellesley College; William F. Lee (senior fellow) ’72, partner and former co-managing partner in the law firm Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr; Jessica Tuchman Mathews ’67, distinguished fellow and former president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; Karen Gordon Mills ’75, M.B.A. ’77, former administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration, senior fellow at Harvard Business School, and president of MMP Group; Joseph J. O’Donnell ’67, M.B.A. ’71, chairman of Centerplate, Inc.; Shirley M. Tilghman, LL.D. ‘04 (hon.), president emerita and professor of molecular biology and public affairs at Princeton University; and Theodore V. Wells Jr., J.D. ’76, M.B.A. ’76, partner and co-chair of the litigation department in the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison.Nominations and advice regarding future Corporation appointments may be sent in confidence to [email protected]last_img read more

Continue reading »

Talking Third Platform in Silicon Valley

first_imgThis month, I spoke at The Churchill Club, which convenes gatherings of technology leaders and entrepreneurs from around Silicon Valley to talk about the future of our industry. Over the last 10 years, the size of EMC’s workforce in the Bay Area has mushroomed to more than 7,000 employees. And for the last two years in a row, people surveyed by the San Francisco Business Times/San Jose Business Journal have named EMC one of the top two Best Places to Work in the region. So, the fact that so many people joined us at The Churchill Club to hear our view of the future was another sign of EMC’s growing presence on the West Coast and in the IT industry.A big topic on everyone’s mind is the rise of the so called “third platform” of IT and the disruptive impact of cloud computing on the IT marketplace. We spend a lot of our time thinking about this at EMC.As our friends at IDC explain it, if the first platform of IT was mainframe and minicomputers, and the second platform was the client-server era, the key underlying technologies of the third platform are cloud, mobile, social, and Big Data. This new platform will transform the way the IT industry works, connecting billions of users and millions of applications. The data sets will dwarf traditional, structured data sets. Our customers see the disruptive trend coming, and every one of them wants our help in preparing their business for it—and in squeezing costs out of their second platform infrastructure more efficiently.The new platform introduces a level of mobility that didn’t exist before, thanks to the advent of cloud providers and SaaS providers and the like. Many of these new platform apps run on an infrastructure that looks more like a public cloud infrastructure than a second platform infrastructure inside a conventional data center (although we expect enterprise customers will build these new platform infrastructures inside their data centers as well). So, we see a technology shift to the new platform and a delivery shift in terms of where people can run their applications. We’re only in the first few innings of a nine-inning game that will probably play out over the next 20 years.What we’ve been doing at EMC, in setting up our federated business model the way we have, is to have as many assets addressing this new platform as we can. For example, Pivotal is not dealing with any second platform apps; it is focused on apps in the new platform only. VMware is helping people improve their client-server infrastructure while addressing their mobile/cloud side of the IT fence. And inside EMC Information Infrastructure, in our storage business, an enormous amount of investment is going towards new object storage, software-defined storage, flash—all of which are really important for winning in the third platform infrastructure.This is certainly an exciting time to be in IT—and at EMC.Check out the rest of the talk if you want to hear more.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Winter Squash

first_imgUniversity of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash by determining the varieties best suited for the area. Growers harvest winter squash, which includes pumpkins, when they are mature. Winter squash can be kept for months in storage. Growers harvest summer squash when they are immature, and they must be eaten within a few days.By planting numerous winter squash varieties and monitoring them for diseases and pests, Matteen found that many varieties hold up to diseases and insects better than traditional summer squash. “It’s difficult to grow squash in Georgia because of the long, brutal summers and the many pests and diseases there are to contend with,” said Matteen, who earned a bachelor’s degree in horticulture from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in 2015. He is now working toward a master’s degree in plant pathology at UGA. Matteen’s research focuses on different winter squash varieties, including butternut squash and delicata squash, cheese and tropical pumpkins, and other heirloom types. He has tested two winter squash species to date: Cucurbita pepo, which includes acorn and summer squash varieties, and Cucurbita moschata. He found that C. moschata varieties typically have more disease resistance. From 2015 to 2016, Matteen conducted trials for 11 varieties at UGA’s Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia, on land used to grow organic crops.Matteen tested winter squash varieties: ‘Waltham’ butternut, ‘Zeppelin’ delicata, ‘Metro PMR’ butternut, Seminole pumpkin, Choctaw sweet potato, ‘Thai Kang Kob’ tropical pumpkin, ‘Thelma Sanders’ sweet potato and a fifth-generation cross of ‘Waltham’ butternut and Seminole pumpkin. Matteen found that the two sweet potato squashes and the Seminole, tropical and tan cheese pumpkins held up best against squash pests and diseases.He also found that most C. moschata varieties have resistance to powdery mildew, and that the Seminole and tropical pumpkins offered the best resistance. Powdery mildew is a white, powdery substance that appears on older leaves and eventually spreads to all parts of the plant.Some varieties offered excellent disease resistance but had other issues. The Choctaw sweet potato squash grew well overall, but Matteen faced a new problem when the fruit matured.“The fruit grew really big — massive, in fact. I couldn’t even give them away,” he said.Matteen also tried to determine squash bugs’ preferred varieties for feeding and reproducing. Squash bug adults suck the sap from the plant’s leaves, leaving them speckled before they wither and die. For eight weeks, he rated squash plants during each of the pest’s life stages.“Adult squash bugs, overall, like to feed on all varieties equally,” he said. “They also did not show a strong preference as to where they like to lay eggs and where nymphs like to feed.”Pickleworm, another squash pest, burrows into the fruit, making it unmarketable. Matteen found that ‘Waltham’ butternut and ‘Mrs. Amerson’s’ winter squash and the Seminole pumpkin x ‘Waltham’ butternut cross held up best against pickleworms. He attributes this to their thicker rinds and higher yields.In this, his third, year of research, Matteen plans to add additional squash varieties to his trials at UGA.Elizabeth Little, UGA Cooperative Extension plant pathologist and Matteen’s major professor, recommends that gardeners grow C. moschata winter squash varieties such as Seminole, tan cheese and Waltham butternut.“They grow better here because they have a thicker skin than the C. pepo varieties,” she said. “Seminole is very resistant to disease and it’s an interesting squash that the Seminole (Native Americans) grew. Butternut squash is very popular, but it’s also very susceptible to downy mildew.” For more information on growing squash in Georgia, see the UGA Extension publication “Homegrown Summer and Winter Squash” (Circular 993) at www.extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Hybrid wind-solar project in Minnesota may be perfect option for co-ops, municipalities

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Energy News Network:A trailblazing wind-solar hybrid project in western Minnesota could be a preview of what’s to come as renewable developers look for new ways to bolster projects.The project, developed and owned by Juhl Energy, is among the first of its kind in the country to pair wind and solar on the same site. A 2-megawatt turbine and 500-kilowatt solar installation share an inverter and grid connection, reducing equipment costs compared to two separate projects.The pairing is expected to start producing power this month. Lake Region Electric Cooperative in Pelican Rapids, about 30 miles north of Fergus Falls, will buy the power for its approximately 27,000 members.Juhl managing director Clay D. Norrbom said the plug-and-play nature of the system has attracted at least five other customers, including an industrial company in Iowa. Other customer prospects include cooperatives and municipally owned power providers in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. He predicts Juhl will build at least three this year.“It opens another market that quite frankly five, 10 or 15 years ago was not there,” Norrbom said. “You couldn’t supply to a municipal co-op. The scale and efficiency weren’t good enough to do that. Now you can go and supply at that distribution voltage something that’s price competitive to the end customers.”The hybrid offers an opportunity to increase capacity. Wind turbines operate at a 50 to 55 percent capacity, Norrbom said, while solar in the Midwest sits at 15 percent. By combining power from both sources, the hybrid reaches a capacity factor of 65 to 70 percent, Norrbom said, at a cost substantially less than what Lake Region pays for electricity from its transmission and generation provider Great River Energy. Juhl decided against adding storage due to cost and regulatory issues, both challenges he predicts will dissipate in the future.More: Wind-solar pairing cuts equipment costs while ramping up output Hybrid wind-solar project in Minnesota may be perfect option for co-ops, municipalitieslast_img read more

Continue reading »